Category: eqsjxthounkl

Scaling of metabolic rate with body mass and temperature in teleost fish

first_img1. We examined published studies relating resting oxygen consumption to body mass and temperature in post-larval teleost fish. The resulting database comprised 138 studies of 69 species (representing 28 families and 12 orders) living over a temperature range of c. 40 °C. 2. Resting metabolic rate (Rb; mmol oxygen gas h–1) was related to body mass (M; wet mass, g) by Rb = aMb, where a is a constant and b the scaling exponent. The model was fitted by least squares linear regression after logarithmic transformation of both variables. The mean value of scaling exponent, b, for the 69 individual species was 0·79 (SE 0·11). The general equation for all teleost fish was 1nRb = 0·80(1nM) – 5·43. 3. The relationship between resting oxygen consumption and environmental temperature for a 50-g fish was curvilinear. A typical tropical fish at 30°C requires approximately six times as much oxygen for resting metabolism as does a polar fish at 0°C. This relationship could be fitted by several statistical models, of which the Arrhenius model is probably the most appropriate. The Arrhenius model for the resting metabolism of 69 species of teleost fish, corrected to a standard body mass of 50 g, was 1nRb = 15·7 – 5·02.T–1, where T is absolute temperature (103 × K). 4. The Arrhenius model fitted to all 69 species exhibited a lower thermal sensitivity of resting metabolism (mean Q10 = 1·83 over the range 0–30 °C) than typical within-species acclimation studies (median Q10 = 2·40, n = 14). This suggests that evolutionary adaptation has reduced the overall thermal sensitivity of resting metabolism across species. Analysis of covariance indicated that the relationships between resting metabolic rate and temperature for various taxa (orders) showed similar slopes but significantly different mean rates. 5. Analysis of the data for perciform fish provided no support for metabolic cold adaptation (the hypothesis that polar fish show a resting metabolic rate higher than predicted from the overall rate/temperature relationship established for temperate and tropical species). 6. Taxonomic variation in mean resting metabolic rate showed no relationship to phylogeny, although the robustness of this conclusion is constrained by our limited knowledge of fish evolutionary history.last_img read more

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Giles adds value

first_imgWith the sale of its quiche manufacturing plant to The Food Investment Group at the end of January, Milton Keynes-based Giles Foods closed the door on nearly 30 years of producing and selling chilled quiches. But why sell a successful business that had grown by 150% in its previous year? The answer, says Giles, is added-value bread.Giles has just completed the final phase of building a state-of-the-art speciality bread bakery, at a cost of over £5m. This is situated just around the corner from the old quiche factory. The site has been built in two phases: the initial phase saw construction of a speciality bakery, which has been fitted out with three automated bread lines. This now feeds a new added-value plant, with four automated lines, able to pack into chilled or frozen formats. Realistic pricesBaguettes, ciabatta, focaccia, flat breads, slices and ‘tear-and-share’ are all produced at the new facility. Giles says it offers retailers and foodservice customers quality products, made to individual specifications, at realistic prices. To do this, the firm operates at high technical standards and completed the first full audit of the new site in February, gaining British Retail Consortium (BRC) Accreditation, grade A.While this was happening, the company says it has kept its focus on the Danish pastry market. It has also upgraded its Warminster site, nearly doubling it in size. This site, too, has just achieved BRC accreditation, grade A. Giles Foods’ technical director Cindy Lester says: “To gain grade A accreditation on both sites, while going through the turmoil of selling a major part of the business, has been an immense achievement by all members of the team. It was a real test of our systems and their robustness.” Shop floor upwardsAs a privately owned and managed company, Giles Foods does not have a complicated decision-making structure. The management runs the company from the shop floor upwards. Having turned over nearly £28m a year, before the sale of its quiche business, Giles now has ambitions to double its business from its new base of £13m over the next two years.“‘Who are you?’ has been a question too often asked by buyers, when being contacted by the sales team,” says David Marx, sales and marketing director. “With buyers in high street retailers changing every 18 months to two years, we have to make a lasting impact. In order to do that, we will lead in development, quality and reliability.”last_img read more

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Belcolade

first_imgBelcolade (Belgium) is launching a new Collection range of single-origin chocolate.”From cocoa plantations of Costa Rica, Ecuador, Papua New Guinea, Peru and Venezuela, it will help bakers, chocolatiers and pastry chefs capitalise on the rising demand for single-origin chocolate,” says Matt Crumpton, marketing director of Puratos UK. “It offers alast_img

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Speech: Let Us Act for the Sake of Humanity

first_imgThe plight of the Rohingya community is one of the largest refugee crises in recent history. And it is one of the most pressing humanitarian and human rights crises facing this Council, our Council, today.A year on the Rohingya population of Rakhine State were subjected to a campaign of the most truly horrific violence, resulting in grave violations of their human rights and indeed expulsion and deportation from their homes. It is this Council which has a duty to ensure they receive justice and the prospect of a peaceful future.The report issued yesterday by the UN Fact-Finding Mission is the most authoritative account yet of the crimes committed against the Rohingya community. The report details widespread rape and murder committed by the Burmese military; the systematic oppression and persecution they have suffered for many years; and the patterns of violence and violations committed elsewhere in the country.This Council is charged by the international community with the primary responsibility for the maintenance of international peace and security. Crimes against humanity such as those detailed in the Fact-Finding Mission’s report threaten international peace and threaten security. Forced deportations across borders, such as the Rohingya suffered into Bangladesh, are unfriendly acts, but also threaten international peace and security. So it is incumbent the Council should consider the report in depth once the Fact-Finding Mission have made their final presentation to the Human Rights Council in September.But let us be clear, those most affected by this crisis now reside in Bangladesh. As we have already heard, over 700,000 Rohingya refugees, joining more than 300,000 displaced people in previous rounds of violence. Bangladesh, together with the UN and other humanitarian organisations, has indeed saved many thousands of lives. Bangladesh have also, working with the UN and international NGOs have taken significant steps in recent months to mitigate the worst effects of the monsoon season.As we have already heard, indeed so movingly from Ms Blanchett, the Rohingya need our continued support. Their needs range from food, shelter, clean water to education, livelihoods, and specialised assistance – and we must not forget this – they need specialised support and assistance for those victims of sexual violence.The UN’s Joint Response Plan remains desperately underfunded and it is imperative that we all step up and play our part.But the solution to this crisis – let us be clear – lies in Burma. The Rohingya deserve justice. The Fact-Finding Mission has concluded that what happened in Rakhine last year warrants “the investigation and prosecution of senior officials in the Tatmadaw chain of command, so that a competent court can determine their liability for genocide in relation to the situation in Rakhine State.” With so much at stake, it this Council has a duty to ensure there is no impunity for such acts.As our Prime Minister’s Special Representative on Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict, let me assure this Council, let me assure Rohingya community: this is a key priority for our Prime Minister, our government, and for myself.And the Rohingya must be able to return home to Rakhine safely, voluntarily and importantly, with dignity. That means more than returning to IDP camps on the Burmese side of the border, but real progress towards a more just long-term solution and state of affairs in Rakhine.As a result of this Council’s concerted action, though we have seen some steps forward.The Burmese government has engaged with Special Envoy Christine Schraner Burgener whose diplomatic work we support. They have signed an Memorandum of Understanding with UNHCR and UNDP. They have established a Commission of Inquiry to look into reports of human rights violations.These steps are welcome. They have not been easy for the civilian government, whose action remains constrained by the military, but more needs to be done. The steps taken are not enough.The Burmese authorities need to provide UNHCR and the UNDP unconditional and unqualified access to northern Rakhine. Until these UN agencies can operate effectively, it is impossible to argue that conditions in Rakhine are anywhere near what is required for the safe, voluntary, and dignified repatriation that this Council has called for.There is an urgent need for domestic acceptance and accountability in Burma. It is essential that the Burmese government sets out how its Commission of Inquiry will be able to investigate these crimes with full impartiality, how it will access UN information, and how it will be linked to a judicial process to hold accountable those responsible and let us be clear – particularly those in the military.It is far from clear that any mechanism established by the Burmese authorities can do this, which is why the UK supports keeping open the option of justice delivered through international mechanisms.We need to see practical progress on implementing the Rakhine Advisory Commission’s recommendations. That includes recommendations on economic development, which are part of the solution, but it also includes those related to the rights of the Rohingya, including a pathway to citizenship.These recommendations taken comprehensively, as they were set out by the revered and respected late Kofi Annan, remain the best blueprint for a long-term solution in Rakhine.So what does it mean for us? What does it mean for the Security Council? It means, in our view, that the Council should do 3 things:Firstly, continue to assist Bangladesh and the UN in providing protection and assistance to the Rohingya population and their host communities.Second, take concerted action to push for justice and the prospect of a peaceful future that the Rohingya community deserve. This includes holding a serious discussion on the conclusions of the Fact-Finding Mission’s report.And, thirdly, support those in Burma who are pushing for progress. But we should also be prepared to use the full range of tools at this Council’s disposal to apply pressure against those – including the Burmese military – who obstruct it. The United Kingdom has done this within the European Union where we have sanctioned seven senior Burmese military officials.But we all accept that this crisis is complex and has deep roots. It will not be solved overnight. But let us also be clear, it will not be solved without continued engagement and action from this Council.So as we mark one year on from the violence of August 2017, this Council should shoulder its responsibility and do justice to the gravity of the attacks on the Rohingya community.We should not be just discussing and debating. We need to be acting, acting to bring an end to the appalling ethnic cleansing, to help those suffering refugees, and bring justice for the victims of appalling crimes.And I appeal to all fellow members, let us put aside our differences. Let us act on the principles of our Charter and on our obligations in front of us. Let us act in the interests of Leila, let us act in the interests of Youssef, let us act in the interests of tens of thousands of Leilas and Youssefs. Let us act for the sake of humanity.last_img read more

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We Love Bread: British Baker campaigns for the loaf

first_imgThis is a call to arms. Bakers we need you to defend bread.At British Baker, we know that bread is often tarnished with the reputation of being unhealthy. That is why we today we launch our new campaign – #WeLoveBread.What is more, Mintel has predicted bread volumes will be down by 1.4% in 2014.The final kick in the teeth was the admission by Prime Minister David Cameron that he is giving up bread in a bid to lose weightAs nutritionists have told us, bread as a carbohydrate is key in having a balanced diet, despite the media-fuelled stories which link it to a bad diet.The #WeLoveBread campaign will follow Mr Cameron, and will lobby for a response from him regarding his current thoughts on eating bread.How can you helpWe want to know what loaves are on offer in your bakery this week? Are you bringing out any exciting loaves? With the hashtag #LoveBreadFridays, we want you to tweet us on a Friday about anything exciting you are doing with bread. It could be a new product, a new sandwich, your valued customer with their favourite roll- anything that screams #WeLoveBread. As well as getting you involved on social media, British Baker will be organising some exciting stunts to raise the profile of the campaign. Keep checking the magazine and our website to watch the campaign unfold.last_img read more

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The Marcus King Band Taps Warren Haynes For Allman Brothers Cover At Red Rocks [Video]

first_imgThe Marcus King Band made their Red Rocks debut on Saturday night, opening up for Gov’t Mule and Yonder Mountain String Band at the beloved Morrison, Colorado venue. It was the band’s first time playing the legendary stage together, though King himself joined Lettuce for Rage Rocks back in May. While still an extraordinarily young band, touring the country vigorously throughout the year, MKB’s performance at Red Rocks felt long-awaited. And boy, did they deliver!Fellow collaborator and musical mentor Warren Haynes joined Marcus King Band during their opening set, for a ripping version of the Allman Brothers Band‘s “Dreams.” Of course, the two have collaborated before, with Haynes producing and playing on The Marcus King Band’s self-titled 2016 album. The ABB theme continued through Gov’t Mule’s headlining set, when King emerged to close the first set with “Whipping Post,” then returned again for an encore with members of Yonder Mountain String Band for the Mule debut of “Melissa.” The collaborators, which included YMSB’s Dave Johnston, Adam Aijala, Allie Kral, and Jake Joliff, jammed straight into “Mountain Jam,” before bringing “Melissa” to a fantastic reprise. In addition to the closing Allman Brother tunes, Mule performed “Come And Go Blues and included a “Les Brers In A Minor” tease earlier in the set–totaling five Allman covers in Mule’s set. The Marcus King Band’s opening “Dreams” truly set the tone for a fantastic night of heartfelt music from all three bands.Watch Warren Haynes join The Marcus King Band for “Dreams” below, courtesy of Jeremiah Rogers:Watch Marcus King join Gov’t Mule for “Whipping Post,” courtesy of kellypearson1000:Watch Marcus King, Dave Johnston, Adam Aijala, Allie Kral, and Jake Joliff join Gov’t Mule for “Melissa”>”Mountain Jam”>”Melissa” below, courtesy of D Ragoose:See below for Paul Dumah Morgan’s depiction of MKB’s Red Rocks debut:[cover photo by Gary Sheer]last_img read more

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NY AG Renews Halting Debt Collection For State Medical And Student Debt

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) NEW YORK —New York State has renewed, for the fifth time, an order to halt collection of medical and student debt owed to the state of New York that has been specifically referred to the Office of the Attorney General (OAG) for collection.In response to continuing financial impairments resulting from the spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), Attorney General Letitia James renewed orders again from this coming Sunday, through Friday, Sept. 4, 2020. After this period, James will reassess the needs of state residents for another possible extension. Additionally, the OAG will accept applications for suspension of all other types of debt owed to the state of New York and referred to the OAG for collection.“Too many New Yorkers are still enduring the financial hardships of this pandemic,” said James. “We have the power to help tens of thousands of New Yorkers who are struggling to make ends meet, which is why we are again suspending the collection of state student and medical debt referred to my office. As we continue our work to stop the spread of this virus, we must also work to rebuild our economy and help New Yorkers get back on their feet, and that starts with ensuring our state’s residents are not unnecessarily burdened with additional debt payments at this time.”Since COVID-19 began to spread rapidly across the country in mid-March, tens of millions of residents across the nation have filed for unemployment, including more than 3.4 million in New York state alone, James said. last_img read more

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Poland’s largest utility talking about long-term coal phaseout, green energy transition

first_imgPoland’s largest utility talking about long-term coal phaseout, green energy transition FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Platts:Poland’s largest power utility Polska Grupa Energetyczna (PGE) is targeting phasing out its coal-fired power station fleet by 2040-2045, company officials told S&P Global Platts on June 2.“We’re talking about withdrawing the entire hard coal and lignite fleet in 20-25 years,” said Maciej Burny, director of the company’s Brussels office. “In Poland, we’re thinking of a similar direction to the one that Germany is taking. If you look at the timeframe for both countries it is quite comparable. The Germans are doing it in 2038 with a smaller coal base in the energy mix,” he said.Deputy chief executive for corporate affairs Pawel Cioch said PGE planned to publish a 10-year strategy in three months’ time that will rest on three pillars ‒ offshore and onshore wind and PV solar. “Our green transition is a fact, this is not just talking,” he said.The strategy would provide a clear timeline for decommissioning coal assets. “Our coal phase-out plan will lay out the lifetimes of the existing assets. Many of them will be decommissioned much sooner than 2045 due to lower efficiency and technical degradation,” Burny said.The last coal assets to be decommissioned will be two 900 MW units commissioned last year at Opole and a 490 MW lignite unit at Turow that is scheduled to be commissioned later this year. Burny said those units’ viability over the next 25 years would depend on how carbon prices evolved, but guaranteed 15-year capacity market payments should help them remain profitable for longer.PGE’s generation is dominated by lignite and hard coal. In the first quarter of this year, the fuels accounted for 84% of the company’s generation despite a 10 percentage point year-on-year fall in lignite utilization. In 2015-2018, the company spent 96% of its investment outlays, or Zloty 27.9 billion ($7.1 billion), in acquiring, renovating or building coal and lignite generation assets, as well as on gas co-generation plants.The company’s change of direction was prompted by rising carbon prices and higher EU emissions targets. “Previously, there was perhaps a notion to prolong difficult decisions. There were signs that things may change in a few years. Now, we see that this is not the way forward. We either change now or never,” Burny said.[Henry Edwardes-Evans, Adam Easton]More: Interview: EU policies prompt Poland’s PGE to pursue green transitionlast_img read more

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Stresslines: Ten ways to feel better about life

first_img March 1, 2004 Regular News Stresslines: Ten ways to feel better about life Ten ways to feel better about life Dr. Karen D. Unger 1. Have reasonable expectations for yourself.2. Allow your self rating of your daily performance to just be “good enough.” Save the perfection standard for another day when you’re real old.3. Give yourself a compliment each day; it doesn’t cost anything and the benefits are great.4. When you feel overwhelmed, try to get another perspective. Ask yourself: How would someone from a war-torn country view my problem? Stop catastrophizing; it really is not helpful.5. Stop criticizing yourself physically, and financially. Do you really expect to look like a movie star, and earn $800K per week? Re-read number 1.6. Remember, bad stuff happens to everyone all the time. Life—it’s not a conspiracy against you.7. Tell yourself: “Know what? You’re doing OK.”8. Enjoy your pets — it decreases blood pressure and stress.9. Remove “should” from your vocabulary (Bet you can’t do it for a whole week).10. Get yourself an ice cream cone this week because you were real good. Dr. Karen D. Unger has a private counseling, and psychotherapy practice in Valrico and may be reached at (813) 684-1404 or at [email protected] This column is published under the sponsorship of the Quality of Life and Career Committee. The committee’s Web site is at www.fla-lap.org/qlsm. The Quality of Life and Career Committee, in cooperation with the Florida State University College of Law, also has an interactive listserv titled “The Healthy Lawyer.” Details and subscription information regarding the listserv can be accessed through the committee’s Web site or by going directly to www.fla-lap.org/qlsm.last_img read more

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Elmont, Wyandanch Armed Home Invasions Probed

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Police are investigating a pair of armed home invasions in Wyandanch and Elmont last week, including one case in which a victim as stabbed in the face, authorities said.Two men entered a second-floor apartment on Louis Avenue in Elmont, where one of the suspects struck a 40-year-old woman in the face with a sharp object in her bedroom at 2:33 p.m., causing a laceration, Sunday, Nassau County police said.When the victim yelled, the duo fled. They were last seen on foot heading northbound on Louis Avenue.  The victim was taken to a local hospital for treatment of her injuries.Both suspects were described as 5-foot, 6-inch-tall Hispanic men in their 30s with average builds. One was wearing a black t-shirt, and the other was wearing a white t-shirt and white glove.In the other case, a knife-wielding man kicked in the door of a home on Straight Path in Wyandanch at 10:15 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 23, demanded money from a victim, and fled when she said she had none.The victim was not injured in that case. There were neither any arrests nor any description of the suspect in that case.Detectives are continuing the investigations.last_img read more

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