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Alternative deposits: proptech firm secures new deal with lettings platform

first_imgHome » News » Alternative deposits: proptech firm secures new deal with lettings platform previous nextAlternative deposits: proptech firm secures new deal with lettings platformReposit and Tenant Shop have signed a deal that will enable letting agents to offer tenants ‘zero deposit’ renting.Nigel Lewis27th March 201901,074 Views Tenant services supermarket Tenant Shop is to begin offering a cash rental deposit alternative after signing a distribution deal with Reposit.The partnership will enable letting agents to offer tenants a service that will help them move into a property without paying the five-weeks’ cash security deposit that will become law on June 1st.This deal with Tenant Shop is a significant boost for Reposit, which was ‘paused’ recently while it retooled its online and app-based service and subsequently received  a fresh cash injection of £500,000 from investors.Tenant Shop is an established player in the tenant services sector and has been in business for over ten years.“We select our partners very carefully taking great pride in offering our agents best in class solutions,” says Glenn Seddington, Managing Director of Tenant Shop (left).“And we did a significant amount of due diligence to find the right security deposit alternative and feel that Reposit offers the best product on the market. This is a key addition for us as more and more tenants look for a new way to rent property without the hassle of a deposit.”Reposit will be added to the Tenant Shop next month and letting agents and their landlords will be able to use the service via a direct introduction from Tenant Shop or coupled with referencing via their preferred referencing partner, UKtenantdata.Reposit’s product offers eight weeks’ rent as cover, three weeks more than the soon-to-be introduced legal maximum, while Reposit will deal with all collections of owed money from the tenant.Glenn Seddington Reposit tenant shop UKtenantdata March 27, 2019Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 Conveyancing Foundation provides stress management tips1st May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021last_img read more

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George Washington CSG Engages in Talisman Sabre 2015

first_img View post tag: Asia-Pacific Sailors from the George Washington Carrier Strike Group (GWCSG) began their portion of Talisman Sabre 2015 off the north coast of Australia, July 7.Exercise Talisman Sabre 2015 is a biennial training activity aimed at improving Australian and U.S. combat readiness and interoperability.The GWCSG will join the more than 33,000 U.S. and Australian personnel, 21 ships, more than 200 aircraft and three submarines, in this sixth iteration of the exercise. The strike group will focus on joint training alongside the Royal Australian Navy and Air Force by conducting sea and air training throughout multiple areas in and around Australia.Participants from the GWCSG include Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) with embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5 and Destroyer Squadron 15, Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Antietam (CG 54), and Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS Chafee (DDG 90), USS Mustin (DDG 89) and USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62).[mappress mapid=”16421″]Image: US Navy View post tag: Navy July 7, 2015 Share this article View post tag: Talisman Sabre 2015 Back to overview,Home naval-today George Washington CSG Engages in Talisman Sabre 2015 George Washington CSG Engages in Talisman Sabre 2015 View post tag: George Washington View post tag: News by topic View post tag: CSG View post tag: Naval Authoritieslast_img read more

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In my world

first_imgLast week I took a call from BB asking if I’d like to become a regular columnist, and I thought, ’At last! I’ve found a new audience for my ever-rising enthusiasm for all things baking.’ But where to start? My five-minute verbal stream, spilling out like dough on the move, covered some of the issues of the moment: my relief at getting five stars at our third shop in the EHO’s ’Scores on the Doors’ scheme; and a recently revived Lardy cake recipe, generously shared with me by Ro Richards, who although in his 90s, spent a day with me in the bakery, passing on the recipe and, vitally, his time-honoured method. Then there’s my work with Theo Guy at Bristol City college to introduce a Craft Bakery Modern Apprenticeship scheme; the reaction of our customers to the foreign taste of Oil of Cassia in our proper Easter biscuits.Having signed a 40-year rolling contract to write this column(!), I figured, why not start with an unashamed plug for a new book to which I’ve written the foreword: Baking Bread with Children by Warren Lee Cohen (Hawthorn Press). Check it out for top-drawer inspiration.So, why do I think it’s important that we bake with children? Well, my observation is that anyone who baked as a child always remembers it in a very positive way (mentally insert 1950s knitting pattern image of baking with mother). Those young helpers grow up, and if they don’t go on to actually become bakers, they’re surely more likely to part with their disposable income on our fancies. Is this a half-baked idea?My visits to bake at local schools have proved otherwise. As part of our long-term strategy to increase footfall, we need to let these youngsters glimpse the wonders and joys of our ancient craft; they’re the customers and bakers of the future.Last week, while collecting wood for my oven, I bumped into a neighbour, who was supervising a group of disaffected teenagers, on a camp out. The biggest of the kids was effin’ and jeffin’, because someone had stolen his fags. He sauntered up to me and demanded, “You Hobbs?….. I ****in’ love your sun-dried tomato bread!”Bread is a universal language. We need it and it’s ace to be reminded that it’s even possible to love it.See you at the Baking Industry Exhibition at the NEC. I’ll be wearing a badge reading Hobbs House Bakery and on the blag for scalpels. If you have any childhood memories of baking you’d like to share, please email me: [email protected]last_img read more

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Warburtons secures Free-From award

first_imgGluten-, wheat- and dairy-free seed wraps from Warburtons’ free-from brand Newburn Bakehouse have been named Product of the Year (POY) 2015 in the Free-From category. POY is the largest award to recognise product innovation, as voted for by consumers, with 86% of people claiming they were more likely to buy a product with a POY award. This is the first year the awards have had a Free-From category and Warburtons is promoting it on-pack.The Newburn Bakehouse brand was launched in 2011 and the seeded wraps include millet seed, linseed and sunflower seed, while being low in saturated fat and high in fibre.Chris Hook, director of Newburn Bakehouse, said: “We’re absolutely thrilled for our Seeded Wraps to have been recognised by Product of the Year – a particularly prestigious accolade, given that it is chosen by consumers themselves.“With 10 new products launched in the last year alone, we are constantly looking to innovate in the free-from sector, particularly as the consumption of free-from food becomes more widespread. The award is testament to our ambition to ensure that those with food intolerances or those choosing to eat gluten-, wheat- or dairy-free can enjoy the same great quality and taste that Warburtons families across the UK do.”last_img read more

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Professor explores Notre Dame’s St. Patrick’s Day history

first_imgSt. Patrick’s Day carries many different meanings. For the Irish, it is the Catholic feast day of Ireland’s patron saint and a day for honoring Irish heritage. For Irish-Americans, St. Patrick’s Day has become a celebration of Irish-American identity. And at Notre Dame — a school with the Irish leprechaun as a mascot — St. Patrick’s Day holds special significance, although spring break sometimes keeps students off campus on the holiday.Deborah Rotman, an anthropology professor and director of Notre Dame’s Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE), has conducted research on the Irish-immigrant experience in the U.S. and in South Bend.“The history of Notre Dame and St. Patrick’s Day actually goes back to our founding as an institution,” Rotman said.Although Fr. Edward Sorin was French, four of the seven monks who founded the University were Irishmen. In the midst of building the Notre Dame campus in 1842, Sorin had to address growing anti-immigrant sentiment toward Irish immigrants in the South Bend community. As a result, Rotman said Sorin made a point to integrate the Irish into the Notre Dame Catholic community. He established Sorinsville, a residential neighborhood around campus where the Irish-Catholic immigrants would reside together. Although Rotman said this strategy separated the immigrants from the community, she said Sorin wanted to help the immigrants integrate.“Sorinsville may seem like a form of residential segregation, but Fr. Sorin’s intent was to stabilize the workforce for the University and help these immigrants create new lives for themselves in South Bend,” she said.Despite his work with the Irish, Sorin banned the celebration of St. Patrick’s Day at Notre Dame, a decision that was justified for security reasons, Rotman said.“Most people do not know that Sorin’s decision to forbid celebration on St. Patrick’s Day was grounded in his belief that the anti-immigrant sentiment of the time was a public-safety issue,” she said. “In other words, Sorin was not trying to scorn the Irish or evade a day of festivities; he was really just trying to to protect the Notre Dame community from potential social conflict.”By the time of Sorin’s death, Rotman said the negative sentiment toward Irish-Catholics “shifted” to other immigrant groups, and Americans began to embrace the Irish much more. As a result, St. Patrick’s Day at Notre Dame involved a variety of activities. Every year, a Mass commemorated the feast of St. Patrick, the band played Irish sacred music in front of the Dome and students recited Irish poems to one another for entertainment. Classes were cancelled for University-wide concerts, banquets, football games, plays and parades.By the early 2000s, Notre Dame students had established a variety of festive traditions for St. Patrick’s Day. Some students attended the feast day Mass which features Notre Dame Folk Choir’s collection of Irish sacred music. Students dressed for class in green garb and make-shift “bands” paraded through academic buildings playing the bagpipes. Many of the dorms on campus hosted cookouts or gave out Irish paraphernalia, and the dining halls offered Irish cuisine in the form of potato dishes and cabbage.This year marked another year of a spring break St. Patrick’s Day. In fact, there have only been a handful of years in which St. Patrick’s Day has actually taken place when students were on-campus. Rotman dispelled the notion that the administration manipulates the dates of spring break to prevent a rowdy, on-campus celebration of the holiday. She noted that by rule spring break must begin the Saturday after the 39th class day.“I do not believe the administration purposely schedules spring break to avoid St. Patrick’s Day,” Rotman said. “I think the scheduling ultimately comes down to the timing of Christmas and Easter break, and they have to follow the registrar’s spring semester calendar rules, too.”Tags: Father Sorin, Heritage, immigrants, Notre Dame history, Saint Patrick’s Daylast_img read more

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Tickets Now Available for Revolution in the Elbow of Ragnar Agnarsson Furniture Painter

first_img Based on a story by Ívar and Gunnlaugur Jónsson, Revolution in the Elbow of Ragnar Agnarsson Furniture Painter answers the hypothetical question, “have you ever wondered what’s going on inside your elbow?” The emotionally charged rock love story explores a love triangle set in Elbowville, a small community within Ragnar Agnarsson’s body. Elbowville mayor Manuela (Huffman) must deal with a crisis when a “prosperity machine” compromises the peace of the sweet little community. Huffman won a Tony for her performance in The Producers; her additional Broadway credits include The Nance, Steel Pier and La Cage aux Folles. Shindle most recently appeared on Broadway in Wonderland, and has also starred in Legally Blonde, Cabaret and Jekyll & Hyde. In addition to Huffman and Shindle, the cast includes Michael Biren, Patrick Boll, Zach Cossman, Karli Dinardo, Danielle Kelsey, Graydon Long, Brad Nacht, Josh Sassanella, Marrick Smith and Jesse Wildman. Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 20, 2014 Revolution in the Elbow of Ragnar Agnarsson Furniture Painter View Commentscenter_img Tickets are now on sale for the world premiere of Revolution in the Elbow of Ragnar Agnarsson Furniture Painter, a new musical starring Tony winner Cady Huffman and Kate Shindle. Directed by Bergur Þór Ingólfsson, the tuner, which features a book, music and lyrics by Ívar Páll Jónsson, begins performances on July 28 at the Minetta Lane Theatre. Opening night is set for August 13. Revolution in the Elbow will feature choreography by Lee Proud, set and projection design by Petr Hloušek, lighting design by Jeff Croiter and Cory Pattak, sound design by Carl Casella and costumes by Hrafnhildur Arnardottir. Related Showslast_img read more

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Griswold Purchases Ready Mix Company Assets

first_imgGriswold and Company is pleased to announce the purcahse of the assets of Acro Redimix, located in Waterford, VT. With five ready mix locations, Griswold and Company now services the ready mix needs of Northern Vermont.Griswold and Company, though associated mainly with ready mix concrete, does concrete form work and produces a variety of concrete products including pavers, block, pipe, steps, manholes, septic tanks, architectural precast, and Sakrete for home and commercial use.last_img

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U.S. Cuts 2016 Coal Production Outlook

first_imgU.S. Cuts 2016 Coal Production Outlook FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Molly Christian for SNL:The U.S. government cut its coal production outlook for 2016 as the year began with the lowest monthly production total since July 1983.The U.S. Energy Information Administration estimates that domestic coal production totaled 59 million tons in January, a 7% decline versus the prior month. The government agency expects that U.S. coal production will total 834 million tons in 2016, a 2.2% decline versus the prior outlook and a 6.4% decline versus the prior-year total of 890 million tons. For 2017, the EIA expects that coal production will rise 0.9% to 841 million tons, a 0.3% decline versus the prior outlook.The government agency expects the Interior region to account for 20% of domestic production in 2016 and 2017, up from 13% of production a decade ago, as production declines at a slower rate than that of the Appalachian and Western regions.“This increase in share reflects the [Interior] region’s growing competitive advantages compared with other U.S. coal-producing regions, [including] higher heat content, closer proximity to major markets than Western region coal, and lower mining costs than Appalachia-produced coal,” the report said.Meanwhile, the EIA expects power-sector coal demand will remain flat as increased demand resulting from rising natural gas prices is offset by growing renewables penetration of the power market and coal plant retirements. The government agency projects that power-sector coal demand will slide 0.1% to 746 million tons in 2016, a 0.9% decline versus the prior outlook, before recovering 0.5% in 2017 to 750 million tons, up 0.9% versus the prior outlook.Full articlee ($): US government trims coal production outlook, projects demand to remain flatlast_img read more

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D’Addario & Co. Guitar String Maker Humming Along

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A century ago, an immigrant who settled in Astoria set up a tiny, home-based guitar string manufacturing shop, continuing a family tradition that he brought with him from the Italian countryside.That immigrant, Charles D’Addario, passed along the family trade to his children and grandchildren, who set up a larger manufacturing facility in Lynbrook with five employees four decades ago. Nowadays, D’Addario & Co. has an almost 200,000-square-foot facility in Farmingdale that employs nearly 1,000 workers, making it the world’s largest musical instrument accessory manufacturer. It recently opened a European division, effectively coming full circle.“We are very excited by the creation of D’Addario Europe and we look forward to advancing our brands in these extremely vital markets,” says John D’Addario, III, president of D’Addario & Company, Inc. “Our family began string making in Europe, so it is personally meaningful to return to Europe with the promise of building more direct relationships with this historic and vibrant music community.”Musicians who use their strings read like a who’s who of big-name acts: Keith Urban, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Zac Brown, and many more. Part of D’Addario’s success is its worldwide distribution and dealer networks. The company products are marketed in the United States through wholesale distribution and more than 5,400 retail music stores. Their products are sold in 101 countries worldwide.John Jr. and James D’Addario have taken great steps to pass down the family tradition. The family-owned company’s roots date back to the 17th century, originating in the small Italian town of Salle. The family traces their start in the craft back eight generations. A baptismal form filled out by their ancestor, Donato D’Addario, listed his occupation as cordaro, which is Italian for string maker.Centuries later, John D’Addario is still keeping the family business in tune.last_img read more

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5 marketing trends for 2015

first_imgAre you prepared for the marketing trends of 2015? The Credit Union Times reported five marketing trends for 2015 last week and as a DigitalMailer client we wanted to let you know how you can utilize our tools to make sure your financial institution is a trend-setter.The article, which can be seen here, noted the five trends we will see this year are:Digital Advertising DominatesMaking Digital InvestmentsPredicting What Members WantMaking it Real with Video MarketingThe Latino Market Is CallingWe’ll break down the facts, the predictions and how you can prepare as a client of DigitalMailer.1. Digital Advertising DominatesAccording to the article, credit union marketing professionals expect to see credit unions shift more dollars from traditional advertising to digital advertising.A Gartner survey showed that digital advertising spending averaged about 25 percent of a company’s marketing budget last year, but around half of those companies plan to increase their digital marketing budget by 17% on average in 2015. continue reading » 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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