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Baseball blows past SFA, 12-3

first_imgNoah Parker Another series win lands TCU Baseball in the top 5, earns Sikes conference award Linkedin TCU News Now 4/1/2021 Linkedin printThe TCU Horned Frogs won 12-3 over the Stephen F. Austin Lumberjacks at home on Feb. 26, marking their seventh win of the season. The Frogs scored four runs in the bottom of the first inning and never looked back, capitalizing on several SFA miscues and working through their entire batting order. SFA started slow, walking lead-off man Porter Brown and first baseman Austin Henry to bring up Gene Wood, who was hit by a pitch to load the bases. Brown opened up the scoring on the night, stealing home base from third. Then, catcher Kurtis Byrne drove in Henry on a base hit — the first of his career — and Wood on an SFA error. “I was just excited for him to get that one out of the way,” head coach Jim Schlossnagle said on Byrne’s first hit. “He’s a really good player.”At one point during the second inning, TCU was ahead 4-0 while having only recorded two hits. TCU’s offense kept up the pace, adding on three more runs in the third inning. TCU gained five more runs through the last four innings to stretch the lead even further.Riley Cornelio pitched the first 2.2 innings of the 12-3 victory vs Stephen F. Austin on Feb 26, 2020, allowing just one hit. Photo by Jack Wallace.TCU’s starting pitcher Riley Cornelio only allowed one hit but walked three batters in a 2.2 inning outing. Cornelio was removed after a string of walks and a hit-by-pitch. Austin Krob lead the Frogs’ pitching staff with three strikeouts on the night.“He wasn’t throwing the breaking ball for strikes,” Schlossnagle said about Cornelio. “He just got out of his element.”Schlossnagle was pleased with TCU’s offensive effort that produced 12 runs on the night. “We’ve been swinging the bat really well,” he said, “much better than we anticipated going into the season.”Byrne’s first hit came in limited action as starting catcher Zach Humphries was subbed in for one at-bat late in the game. “Kurtis is going to catch at least once a week for sure,” Schlossnagle said. “Humphries is our catcher, but Kurtis is a huge part of our team and a big part of our future, so we’ve gotta make sure we give him a lot of playing time.”TCU returns to action Friday night for the first of a three-game home series with California. First pitch Friday is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. TCU rowing program strengthens after facing COVID-19 setbacks + posts Twitter TCU baseball finds their biggest fan just by saying hello ReddIt Facebook Noah Parkerhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/noah-parker/center_img Noah Parkerhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/noah-parker/ Noah Parkerhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/noah-parker/ TCU News Now 2/10/2021 Facebook Noah Parkerhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/noah-parker/ TCU News Now 3/17/2021 Previous articleWomen’s basketball fall to UT, 77-67Next articleBlanket Coverage – 2019-20 NFL Exit Interviews Episode 102 – Lions and Giants Noah Parker RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Austin Henry blasts off a foul ball vs Stephen F. Austin on Feb 26, 2020. Photo by Jack Wallace Twitter ReddIt Despite projected results, key days still ahead in post-election processlast_img read more

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President Uribe endangers left-wing editor by accusing him of links to guerrillas

first_img ColombiaAmericas April 27, 2021 Find out more ColombiaAmericas President Alvaro Uribe’s comments in an interview on Caracol Radio on 23 February, accusing Carlos Lozano, the editor of the communist weekly Voz, of links with the guerrillas of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), were condemned today by Reporters Without Borders, which said they had endangered Lozano.“Does having communist sympathies make you an ally of the FARC?,” the press freedom organisation asked. “President Uribe seems to forget that Lozano was once appointed by the government as peace mediator with the guerrillas. Alas, this is not the first time Uribe has lost his temper with journalists who do not support him. This kind of remark is dangerous as it exposes the press to reprisals.”Uribe called Lozano an “accomplice and spokesman” of the FARC. Lozano responded several times during the first week of March, saying he would hold Uribe responsible if anything happened to him. “The president’s comments are slanderous and reckless, and put my life and safety in danger,” he said. He said he was no longer in regular contact with the FARC high command, but he was in written contact with guerrillas, “as many journalists are, but all this is known by the government.”Uribe’s comments have surprised the Colombian media, especially as Lozano was once used by the government as an emissary with the guerrillas, as former peace mediator Camilo Gómez pointed out. Lozano said: “I do not understand. If I am a criminal, why do government aides come looking for me to establish contacts with the FARC?”Ramiro Bejarano, a former director of the military intelligence agency known as the Security Administration Department (DAS), told journalists: “Alvaro Uribe is trying to stigmatize all government opponents as criminals in order to cover up his own complicity with the paramilitary groups.” Some of Uribe’s associates are currently being prosecuted because of their ties with paramilitaries.Lozano received death threats in 2005, at a time when Uribe was reacting harshly to criticism from journalists such as Hollman Morris of the public TV station Canal Uno about his policies towards the armed conflict. October 21, 2020 Find out more RSF_en 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies Follow the news on Colombia RSF, IFEX-ALC and Media Defence, support FLIP and journalist Diana Díaz against state harassment in Colombia to go further March 7, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 President Uribe endangers left-wing editor by accusing him of links to guerrillascenter_img Receive email alerts RSF begins research into mechanisms for protecting journalists in Latin America News News News May 13, 2021 Find out more Reports Organisation Help by sharing this information last_img read more

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UK ‘among highest’ for workplace stress

first_imgStress in the workplace has reached record levels, according to a UnitedNations report. In the five countries studied, stress affected one in 10 staff,and the rate for the UK was among the highest at 15 to 20 per centself-reported anxiety and depression. Stress is now the second biggest cause of long-term disability in the UKafter musculo-skeletal conditions, said the report. Christine Owen, head of OH at consultancy William M Mercer, attributed therise in stress to organisational change. “The pressure to perform hasnever been higher as the squeeze on resources continues,” she said.”Mergers and acquisitions, downsizings and outsourcings have all exactedtheir toll.” Employers had to look at the root cause, she said. For example, long hourscould appear to be the problem but this, in turn, can be caused by a blameculture, lack of management support and excessive bureaucracy. UK ‘among highest’ for workplace stressOn 1 Dec 2000 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Street fair unites people and police

first_img“I always remember back-to-school season as a kid, but l don’t ever remember going out to purchase a backpack. I didn’t get books, so for me, it was important to come and provide things that I knew were a necessity for these kids,” Jackson said. “The community should feel as if USC is its home.”When marketing the event, SOLID reached out on social media and email but wanted to make sure that even people who didn’t have access to technology at the event still felt welcome. Volunteers walked the streets handing fliers out to homeless individuals.Jackson’s mother Ida Herroan said she has lived in South Los Angeles for many years, but this type of community outreach is in many ways a new phenomenon signaling positive change.“What I see here is a great improvement on society,” Herroan said. “It gives [people] that boost in life. They can say, ‘I don’t have to stay in one place. I can move around in this universe.’”For DPS Chief John Thomas, this type of cooperation and community outreach is also a welcome change.“As someone who’s lived through the 1965 riots in L.A. and the 1992 riots in L.A., I didn’t see too many efforts that at the end of those traumatic and tragic incidents people worked with police and the community to bring about better working relationships,” Thomas said.Thomas stressed that DPS is accountable to the public and has a responsibility to prevent issues of mistrust.“I think if nothing else this was a genuine effort on the part of DPS and LAPD to work with the students to build a stronger relationship, and I hope at the end of the day that’s accomplished, and we start working toward the second annual fair.” Follow Kate on Twitter @km_guarino This Saturday marked the first Unity Street Fair organized by USC’s Students Organizing for Literacy, Inclusion and Diversity.Bridging gaps · The Unity Fair welcomed more than 300 people at a park located at the intersection of Hoover Street and Adams Boulevard on Saturday. – Dasha Kholodenko | Daily TrojanThe event brought together USC students, community members, the Dept. of Public Safety and the Los Angeles Police Department. The event was hosted partly in response to allegations of racial profiling and misconduct after LAPD broke up a party of predominantly black students on May 4 of last year.The fair welcomed more than 300 people to the park at the Hoover Recreational Center at the intersection of Hoover Street and Adams Boulevard and was part of a summerlong collaboration among law enforcement, SOLID and multiple student organizations including the Black Student Assembly, the Black Social Work Caucus and USChange Movement.The fair featured a raffle of donated items, a disc jockey and various food options. The park housed different booths set up by organizations including SOLID and the Black Student Assembly. LAPD University Park Task Force also had a booth of uniformed officers who spoke with community members. DPS officers in uniform patrolled the event while others, including Chief John Thomas, came in plain clothes and mingled with guests.SOLID Executive Director Paul Young, a second-year graduate student in the School of Social Work, said the event coordinators hoped to emphasize a spirit of collaboration between law enforcement and the community that went beyond fighting for the students affected on May 4.“We wanted to have a different response,” Young said. “Instead of just advocating for that group we wanted to advocate for the neighborhood, for other students of color. We wanted to put together an event where we can show something positive can come out of the situation.”Selam Kidane, a second-year graduate student at the School of Social Work and member of the Black Social Work Caucus, said there is often a culture of fear surrounding law enforcement, but that dialogue is the key to making lasting changes.“I’d hope that more candid conversations can take place with the community and LAPD and DPS around some of the things that have happened that have scarred the community,” Kidane said.LAPD and DPS have been meeting with student organizations and have worked to change party protocol so that DPS officers will be the ones to act as first responders.Sergeant Jon Pinto of LAPD Southwest Division and the University Park Task Force said the task force, which patrols the area surrounding USC, has also held weekly meetings with DPS to create a unified set of policies to close parties and issue warnings.“We’ve been working with several organizations at USC to heal some of the concerns that the community has and to show the community and university that we’re working in partnership,” Pinto said.Makiah Green, a first-year graduate student in the master of professional writing program and student leader of the USChange Movement, said the purpose of the event reached further than just addressing the issue of parties.“There’s a huge misconception that this is about the party and it’s really not; it’s about the underlying racial biases,” Green said.Green said it was nice to see law enforcement interacting with the community, particularly children that came to the fair, but she still believes fostering a culture of trust will take time.“I feel like the officers and community members have been kind of segregated,” Green said. “I don’t necessarily know if the kind of communication we wanted to occur did but this is only the first event and a lot of people aren’t comfortable with the police, so I think as time goes on, we’ll be able to build those relationships.”SOLID co-founder Jacqueline Jackson, a second-year graduate student in strategic public relations and business fundamentals, said that demonstrating USC could care and provide for the surrounding community was key to the event’s success. Growing up in the Inglewood community not far from USC, Jackson said education was not readily available to her, and she took extensive steps to seek it out. In August of 2012, Jackson and Rikiesha Pierce founded SOLID with the goal of expanding the mile-and-a-half radius that USC serves.“We wanted to build an organization that reached out into the community and brought educational resources and that also brought opportunities to get closer to campus and meet USC students,” Jackson said.Community outreach also  became a large part of Saturday’s fair. Jackson estimates the fair cost upward of $5,000, but various donors, including community members, alumni and DPS contributed funds, as well as raffle prizes, including more than 40 backpacks full of school supplies and 30 bikes.last_img read more

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Washington Road Usage Charge Test Drive Now Complete

first_imgFacebook17Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Washington State Transportation CommissionMore than 2,000 drivers across Washington have turned in the keys and wrapped up their participation in the year-long Washington Road Usage Charge Pilot Project. The test-driving phase of the pilot began in February 2018 and over the course of 12 months, volunteers had the opportunity to test low-tech to high-tech options for recording miles driven, as well as multiple opportunities to share feedback about their experience.“It’s rare to have such a hands-on experience to test a potential new way to fund our transportation system. I’m thankful to our volunteers for their participation and dedication in helping inform the future of transportation in our state,” said Joe Tortorelli, chair of the WA RUC Steering Committee and member of the Washington State Transportation Commission that is leading this project. “We look forward to learning more about the results from the pilot test drive, which will influence the commission’s final report and recommendations to the governor, legislature and U.S. Department of Transportation.”The pilot’s primary goal was to test a potential new system to replace Washington’s gas tax, as cars become more and more fuel efficient. Additionally, the project was designed to ensure a variety of ways for participants to record miles – from low-tech to high-tech reporting methods – as well as to enable active feedback from participants on their experience. Participants were able to choose one of five methods to record their miles and were asked to periodically review mock invoices that compared how much they would pay under a road usage charge system compared to the current gas tax.Collectively, the project’s 2,000-plus test drivers reported 16 million miles driven statewide, sent in over 1,000 emails or phone calls and participated in three surveys. Participants sounded off on a variety of topics including privacy and data collection, compliance and administrative costs, fairness and equity, travel between states, and operational viability.With the test-driving phase complete, the WSTC will work with the WA RUC Steering Committee to review and analyze the data and volunteer feedback collected during the pilot. Findings and recommendations will be presented to the governor, legislature and USDOT in early 2020.last_img read more

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