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Harvard in the military

first_imgTwo Marines are aboard ship in the Mediterranean, readying their platoons for combat. Another just returned from seven months of intense fighting in Afghanistan. One Army officer is now a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford. Another just learned an Afghan language. One Navy ensign has traveled the world and steered a battleship through a storm. Another is a student pilot in Florida.These are just a few updates on the Harvard College graduates who in 2009 and 2010 left school as newly commissioned officers in the Army, Navy, and Marine Corps.Marine 2nd Lt. Daniel West ’09 is now aboard a speedy amphibious ship in the Mediterranean Sea. With him on the USS Mesa Verde is 2nd Lt. Domenico Pellegrini ’09, a friend since their freshman year at Harvard. Both are platoon commanders with the ground combat element of the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit, poised “for any crisis that may arise,” said West, “whether humanitarian aid or kinetic combat action.”Another 2009 classmate and marine infantry platoon commander is 2nd Lt. Joseph Kristol, who just returned from Afghanistan, “where his battalion saw some of the ugliest fighting to date in that country,” said West. Kristol serves with the 3rd Battalion, 5th Regiment — “3/5” — based at Camp Pendleton near San Diego. Last September, the unit arrived in the Sangin district of Helmand province, where Taliban flags flew everywhere, schools were closed, and local markets abandoned. Ahead of the 3/5 was a violent, seven-month grinder of combat — and the heaviest unit casualties so far in Afghanistan: 25 marines killed and close to 200 wounded.“It is truly a privilege to serve with Marines in combat,” wrote Kristol, who coordinated fire support for his company — and had to write letters home to the parents of two machine gunners killed in action. “Unfortunately, I learned firsthand that privilege has a huge price.”The Taliban flags, by the way, are gone.From their ship, West and Pellegrini struck a common chord with other Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) students who graduated from Harvard recently: They are grateful that relations have improved between their alma mater and the military. “It has been special to see the significant growth in relations between Harvard and the military since my freshman year,” wrote Pellegrini, “and I am lucky to have been a small part of it.”Navy Ensign Joshua Foote ’10 echoed that sentiment, saying, “I’m absolutely thrilled about the recent developments in Harvard’s relationship with the military, and very excited to hear that the Navy is re-establishing an ROTC program there.”On March 4, Harvard President Drew Faust and Navy Secretary Ray Mabus signed an agreement that will re-establish an ROTC formal presence on campus for the first time in nearly 40 years.“Our renewed relationship affirms the vital role that the members of our Armed Forces play in serving the nation and securing our freedoms, while also affirming inclusion and opportunity as powerful American ideals,” Faust said at the time. “It broadens the pathways for students to participate in an honorable and admirable calling and in so doing advances our commitment to both learning and service.”Under the agreement, Harvard will resume full and formal recognition of Naval ROTC on the effective date of the repeal of the law that disqualified openly gay men and lesbians from military service, which is expected to happen this summer.Foote is stationed in Yokosuka, Japan, as a combat information center officer aboard the USS John S. McCain, a guided-missile destroyer. “The best way to explain,” he said of his job, “is to think of the dark, neon-lit room you see in the movies that’s full of radar screens and people talking on radios and drawing on boards.” He said, “I own that room, and about half of the sailors who work in there work for me.”Foote has “been to Japan, South Korea, the Philippines, and Vietnam, and sailed in the Pacific Ocean, the Sea of Japan — and the Philippine, Yellow, East China, South China, and Sulu seas,” he wrote. “I have personally driven a multibillion-dollar warship a mile behind an aircraft carrier, at night, in the rain, with F-18 Hornets screaming overhead. … I’ve seen more stars in the night sky than can be seen anywhere on land, and the most beautiful sunsets you can imagine.”Foote participated in the rescue effort following the earthquake and tsunami that recently struck Japan, and was part of the emergency mobilization after North Korea fired artillery shells into a South Korean town last year. All this, and more, happened less than a year after he wrote his last term paper and took his last exam.Two of his 2010 classmates, also Navy ensigns, are in flight school in Florida: Christi Morrissey and Michael Kaehler.While waiting for flight training to start, Kaehler lived the peripatetic life of a young officer. He worked briefly at an ROTC unit at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where since 1976 Harvard students have taken their cadet military training. Then he worked as a Navy recruiter in San Francisco before reporting to Pensacola in September, “about the same time I would have finished my study card for the fall semester,” wrote Kaehler.U.S. Navy Ensign and aviation trainee Michael Kaehler (third from left) poses last fall in Pensacola, Fla., with classmates from his Aviation Preflight Indoctrination (API) course. Kaehler is a 2010 graduate of Harvard College. Photo courtesy of Michael KaehlerHe has since learned to pilot a Cessna 172, studied weather, flight rules, and the basics of aerodynamics, and has gone through survival training. “The most fun, surprisingly,” said Kaehler, was “getting strapped into a mock helicopter and dropped into a pool while blindfolded to practice escaping underwater from an aircraft.” He is now 12 flights into training on a turboprop T-34C, and will tackle aerobatics, night flight, and other requirements.Army 2nd Lt. Roxanne Bras ’09 is tackling intellectual aerobatics as a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford. Still an active duty officer, she will graduate with an M.Phil. in international relations in 2012. From February through August of last year, Bras was deployed to Afghanistan as an officer in an engineering unit. In one picture, she had an M-16 slung on her back. But toward the end of her time in that country, Bras worked on issues involving Afghan women.Army 2nd Lt. Roxanne Bras, Harvard College Class of 2009 and now a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford, served from February through August 2010 with an engineering unit in Afghanistan. Bras (left) is administering an oath to a noncommissioned officer who re-enlisted. Photo courtesy of Roxanne BrasTravel, adventure, and challenge have come in all shapes for the eight Harvard ROTC graduates of 2009 and the 11 commissioned in 2010.Army 2nd Lt. Josué “Josh” Guerra ’10 trained for three months last fall at the Muscatatuck Center for Complex Operations in Indiana. He was learning Dari, one of the major languages of Afghanistan. Since February, he has been at Fort Benning, Ga., to learn squad- and platoon-level tactics, which are “mentally and physically demanding,” he wrote, “though not overwhelming.” Guerra will report for duty at Fort Drum, N.Y, home of the 10th Mountain Division, a light infantry unit.Marine 2nd Lt. Talya Havice ’10 has completed six months of officer training, and a five-month intelligence officer course. She is headed to Camp Pendleton in a few weeks.Navy Ensign Olivia Volkoff ’10 is an engineer at Naval Reactors headquarters in Washington, D.C., where she is training on the design and maintenance of nuclear submarines and aircraft carriers. “This experience has left me totally in awe of the work it takes to take a ship from idea to construction to sea,” she wrote in an email.“It’s been a really incredible year,” Volkoff added. “It’s hard to believe it’s already been a year.”Army 2nd Lt. Karl Kmiecik ’10 has started his medical training at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School to become an Army doctor.Last October, Marine 2nd Lt. Shawna Sinnott ’10 reported to the 26-week Basic School, where new officers learn tactics and other battlefield basics.She is happy to be “directly applying the knowledge I gained at Harvard through my special concentration in ‘Understanding Terrorism,’” wrote Sinnott from Quantico, Va. “Nowhere else would I have been able to create such an interdisciplinary concentration, learning from experts in every academic field. With this basis, I am much more confident in how I will be able to approach the threat and aggressively address it.” After four months in Virginia, she will be stationed at Camp Pendleton near San Diego.Foote said his Harvard education applies to the military life less directly, but still had a powerful positive effect.“I met people from Harvard from every kind of background and learned how to interact with them and relate to them,” he said in an email from Japan. “This is essential for a naval officer.”The intensity of those undergraduate years helped too, said Foote. “The workload is high, the tempo is fast-paced, and the standard by which your work is judged is exacting. Having entered such an environment with four years worth of experience as a student at Harvard, I was able to make the transition without difficulty.”Tradition has helped too, he said. “In a less tangible way, Harvard’s longstanding history with the military has affected my service as well,” Foote wrote. “The men and women of Harvard have a tradition of service that dates to the Pequot War, and I have been and will continue to be honored to carry on that tradition.”last_img read more

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Dennis Schroder: Los Angeles Lakers close to finalising trade for Oklahoma City Thunder guard | NBA News

first_img– Advertisement – The Los Angeles Lakers are closing in on a trade that would see them acquire Oklahoma City Thunder guard Dennis Schroder. In exchange, the Thunder will receive guard Danny Green and the 28th overall pick in Wednesday’s NBA Draft, according to reports from ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski and The Athletic’s Shams Charania.- Advertisement – Schroder was one of the most impactful bench players in the NBA last season as he averaged 18.9 points, four assists and 3.6 rebounds.At one stage he had been tipped as a frontrunner for the Sixth Man of the Year award, which was eventually won by the Los Angeles Clippers’ Montrezl Harrell. Go inside the locker room and watch the Los Angeles Lakers’ celebrations after they were crowned NBA champions – Advertisement – 1:26 LeBron James hugs Rajon Rondo after the Los Angeles Lakers sealed the NBA championship with a 4-2 series win over the Miami Heat The 27-year-old has averaged a career 14.1 points, 4.6 assists and 2.8 rebounds across 496 games, 177 of which he started, having spent five seasons with the Atlanta Hawks prior to landing in Oklahoma in 2018.Green averaged eight points, 3.3 rebounds and 1.3 assists for the Lakers last season, becoming a three-time NBA champion following previous wins with the San Antonio Spurs and Toronto Raptors.The 33-year-old may not be the only departure in LA, with reports suggesting veteran point guard Rajon Rondo is set to decline his $2.6m player option in view of hitting free agency.He averaged 7.1 points, five assists and three rebounds in 48 games last season en route to his second NBA championship victory.Want to watch even more of the NBA and WNBA but don’t have Sky Sports? Get the Sky Sports Action and Arena pack, click here. – Advertisement –last_img read more

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The IPO Commission rejects two of three complaints made by Lennox Linton against Prime Minister Skerrit.

first_imgLocalNews The IPO Commission rejects two of three complaints made by Lennox Linton against Prime Minister Skerrit. by: – July 19, 2011 130 Views   no discussions Share Share Sharing is caring!center_img Mr. Lennox LintonThe Integrity in Public Office Commission (IPO) in a report dated July 1st, 2011 has rejected two of the three complaints made by Mr. Lennox Linton concerning allegations of breach of the Code of Conduct by Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit.Mr. Linton made his complaints to the Commission via a letter dated November 5th, 2010 and addressed to the Chairman, Mr. Julian Johnson. A request was made for the evidence referred to Mr. Linton’s complaint to be forwarded to the Commission. Having examined and discussed the evidence, as well as hearing from the complainant in an oral session on 16th July, 2011, the Commission decided to launch an investigation “to ascertain whether Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit has committed a breach of the provision of Rule 1(e) of the Code of Conduct and an inquiry shall be held into this matter.”The complaints which were made by Mr. Linton are as follows;A) (i) “[the] Prime Minister is in breach of section 47(1) of that Act [Integrity In Public Office Act 2003] by virtue of his possession of unaccounted property, namely eight Ocean Front villas at Guillette, Savanne Paille, with an estimated market value of over 8 million EC dollars which cannot be explained by his legal income,” (letter -page 2);(ii) “in order to finance his ownership interest in these villas which he could not afford on his legal income, the Prime Minister accepted ‘gifts, benefits or advantages’ in contravention of item (c) of the Code of Conduct. The source of these gifts, benefits or advantages is clearly a matter for the Integrity Commission to investigate pursuant to the specific responsibility conferred by section 47(2) of the Act” (letter – page 2);(iii) “on account of his chairmanship of the Cabinet Meeting on October 9th, 2007 which granted a full suite of concessions to Blaircourt Property Development Limited for the construction of the villas at Guillette, the Prime Minister breached item (e) of the Code of Conduct by using his official influence to secure concessions for a business venture in which he had an ownership interest” (letter – page 2) andAccording to the Report which was signed by the Chairman Mr. Julian Johnson and three other members of the Commission,(i) “The complaint concerning section 47(L) of the Act is rejected since it is outwith the Code of Conduct and not within the Commission’s jurisdiction for the reason that section 47(I) is an offence-creating provision that can only be dealt with by the court. It is only where the Director of Public Prosecutions has instituted and successfully undertaken criminal proceedings against a person in public life that he can be said to have been “found to be in possession of property or pecuniary resources” contrary to the section…..”;(ii) “The complaint concerning Rule 1[c) of the Code of Conduct cannot be proceeded with because it is unparticularized, and not supported by the content of the “Evidence Bundle”;(iii) The Commission was of the view that further investigation was required regarding the complaint relating to Blaircourt Property Development.Ms. Helen Ambo, secretary of the Integrity Commission confirmed to Dominica Vibes News that a decision has been arrived at regarding the complaints made by Mr. Linton some time ago.Dominica Vibes News Tweet Sharelast_img read more

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Rohr: Eagles Have Learnt Lessons from Defeat in London

first_imgThe game was a dress rehearsal for Nigeria’s opening Group D match against Croatia, who play a similar style of football with the Serbs.Coming just four days after the Super Eagles defeated Poland in their first warm up game in Wroclaw last Friday, the Franco-German gaffer insisted his wards have no reason to fret as no football team in the world wins all their games.Media Officer of the team, Toyin Ibitoye revealed wednesday that Rohr rather commended the players for their efforts in the London friendly.“Rohr commended the boys and urged them not to drop their heads because no football team in the world wins all their games,” Ibitoye stressed yesterday.“The coach told the team they should learn from this defeat but not suck, but rather go back to their clubs and keep fighting.“He said what was most important after such a loss is how you react, he said we have to bounce back.”The Serbia loss was only the second in 14 games for the Eagles under Rohr’s watch.Installed 20 months ago as Eagles coach, Rohr has won eight matches and drawn four.Meanwhile, scorer of the two goals against Nigeria during the friendly, Mitrovic said yesterday that the Serbia national team fully deserved the win against Nigeria because they did everything their coach told them to do.“Two goals, I scored another which was not counted but it’s the team that is more important,” Mitrovic told reporters after the game.“It was a good match and good result for us. We played well and won which is the important thing for us. We did everything the coach asked us to do. We dominated the game and had total control.” We were the better team and we deserved to win the game. Now, we go back to our clubs and we are all eager to re-assemble again because we know what is expected in Russia,” Mitrovic stressed.After the 1-0 victory over Poland last Friday and this defeat to Serbia on Tuesday, Eagles next game in the pre-FIFA World Cup build-up is the send forth match against Democratic Republic of Congo in Nigeria on Monday, 28th May, to be followed by a prestige game against England’s Three Lions at Wembley five days later.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram INTERNATIONAL FRIENDLIES FALLOUTTechnical Adviser of the Super Eagles, Gernot Rohr, insisted wednesday that his wards have picked up valuable lessons from the 2-0 loss to Serbia in the international friendly played at The Hive Stadium in London on Tuesday night.Two second half goals from Fulham forward, Aleksandar Mitrovic, gave the Serbs victory on the night the three-time African champions were bereft in every department of the friendly.last_img read more

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