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Gov’t Mule Announces Spring Tour, Confirms Summer Release Date For New Album

first_imgGov’t Mule already has a busy year ahead of them, but they’ve just doubled down with a major announcement! The band has revealed a series of seven shows this May, dubbed the “Come What May” tour, taking them from New York, NY to Milwaukee, WI in the process.The new tour starts just a few weeks after the band rocks through a Jazz Fest late night performance, hitting the Central Park SummerStage on May 17th with the Chris Robinson Brotherhood. From there, Mule will head to Upper Darby, PA, Washington DC, and continue West to stops in St. Louis, Kansas City, Minneapolis and Milwaukee.The announcement of the tour also comes with an exciting update about Gov’t Mule’s new studio album. Any ticket purchased online for these upcoming shows comes with a free digital download of the forthcoming studio album! The band has also forecasted the release of said album for the summer of 2017, but hasn’t given many other details about it. Our previous updates came from keyboardist Danny Louis, who shared images of himself and his bandmates in the studio months ago.You can find more info on these tour dates via Mule’s official website. Check out their full tour schedule below, with the new dates in bold.Gov’t Mule 2017 Tour DatesMarch 3: Lake Tahoe, NV @MontBleu ResortMarch 4: Las Vegas, NV @ Brooklyn Bowl VegasMarch 5: Phoenix, AZ @ McDowell Mountain Music FestivalApril 20-22: Live Oak, FL @ Wanee FestivalApril 23: Greenville, SC @ Peace Center Concert Hall*April 24: Huntsville, AL @ Von Braun Center*April 26: Memphis, TN @ Minglewood Hall*April 27: Mobile, AL @ Saenger Theatre*April 28: New Orleans, LA @ Saenger Theatre^May 17: New York, NY @ Central Park SummerStage (W/ Chris Robinson Brotherhood) May 19: Upper Darby, PA @ Tower Theater May 20: Washington, DC @ Warner Theatre May 22: St. Louis, MO @ The Pageant May 23: Kansas City, MO @ Uptown Theatre May 25: Minneapolis, MN @ State Theatre May 26: Milwaukee, WI @ Pabst TheatreMay 25-28: Cumberland, MD @ DelFestAugust 19: Morrison, CO @ Red Rocks Amphitheatre (w/ Yonder Mountain String Band & The Marcus King Band)August 24-27: Arrington, VA @ Lockn’ Festival*With Eric Krasno Band^With Soulivelast_img read more

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Campaign Donations Reflect the Sharp Split in Congress Among Republicans

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By Derek Willis, ProPublicaThis story was co-published with The Daily Beast.The Republican split that defines this year’s presidential campaign has been on display in Congress for years, with the most conservative wing battling party leaders on issues from spending to immigration.A ProPublica analysis of campaign donations highlights just how profound this gap has become in the House of Representatives.The analysis shows that the Republican leadership, including Speaker Paul Ryan and Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, raises money from a vastly different set of political action committees than members further to the right. In fact, the donor bases for Ryan and McCarthy are actually more similar to some Democrats than to their colleagues in the main conservative grouping, the Freedom Caucus.The fundraising disparity stokes the divisive atmosphere in Congress, reinforcing policy differences and sometimes affecting the outcome of legislation in surprising ways.For example, when a Republican-backed plan to ease a campaign finance rule evaporated in Congress, it was the most conservative GOP lawmakers in the House who joined with liberal Democrats to get it killed. ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for their newsletter. Related stories: For more of ProPublica’s coverage of politics and lobbying, check out our ongoing series, The Breakdown. The provision, which died in December, was initiated by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and was included in a must-pass spending bill. It would have eliminated caps on the money a national party committee can spend in coordination with a candidate.The caps were originally meant to reduce the amount of outside cash flowing directly to advocacy for a particular candidate. Those in favor of lifting the restrictions say they are outmoded in the increasingly wild world of campaign finance and effectively give less-accountable outside groups like super PACs more influence than traditional parties.Many Democrats argued that eliminating the caps would have opened the spigot to even more big money in politics. For conservatives, the reason to oppose the McConnell plan was different: It might have helped Republican leaders quash internal dissenters.With a bigger campaign war chest raised from donors who support mainstream Republicans, the party would find it easier to select and back its favored House candidates. “The McConnell rider provides preferential treatment to the Washington establishment,” the Conservative Action Project, a group led by former Attorney General Edwin Meese, wrote in appealing to like-minded lawmakers to fight the measure.The differences in donor bases affect other policy debates, said Dave Brat of Virginia, a Freedom Caucus member who defeated then-Majority Leader Eric Cantor in the 2014 primary and went on to take his seat. For instance, he said, conservatives lost their fight to defund the U.S. Export-Import Bank last year in part because the companies that benefit from the bank won over Republicans and Democrats who received campaign contributions from those firms.The disparity is “a huge deal,” Brat said.ProPublica’s analysis used a calculation called cosine similarity to compare each House members’ donors to others; two members with an identical set of donors would receive a score of 1, while two with no PAC donors in common would get a score of 0.The degree of similarity between Ryan’s 2014 PAC donors and those of Freedom Caucus members Justin Amash of Michigan and Ted Yoho of Florida was close to nil: 0.03 and 0.16. Tim Huelskamp, a Kansas Republican who lost his seat on the House Agriculture Committee in 2012 for his votes against leadership, had few PAC donors in common with Ryan (a score of 0.15) or any other House colleague in 2014: his highest score was 0.3, with fellow Kansan Mike Pompeo.PAC donors to House Majority Leader McCarthy, of California, were more like Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer’s (0.53 score) than they were those of Ohio Republican Jim Jordan, who heads the Freedom Caucus (0.31).The gap between the leadership and insurgents has widened since 2008. That year, McCarthy’s PAC donors were more similar to those of Michele Bachmann, the former Minnesota congresswoman who founded the House’s Tea Party caucus, than they were to PACs that gave to then-Majority Leader Cantor or then-Speaker John Boehner. By the end of 2014, the gulf between McCarthy and the conservatives was much wider: all House GOP leaders, and even 11House Democrats, had PAC donors more similar to McCarthy’s than any member of the Freedom Caucus.var pymParent = new pym.Parent(‘rankings-iframe’, ‘https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/donor-differences?layout=embed’, {});Source: ProPublica analysis of Federal Election Commission data.Credit: Sisi Wei and Derek Willis.The donors that typically back House leaders are large corporate PACs with broad interests before Congress. They include the Automotive Free Trade International PAC, which represents American dealers of foreign car manufacturers. The PAC gives hundreds of thousands of dollars to Republican candidates, of which just $11,500 went to three dozen Freedom Caucus members during the 2014 cycle. On the other hand, none of the leaders received contributions from the Citizens United Political Victory Fund, which is one of the top overall donors to Freedom Caucus members.The two factions do have some PAC donors in common, such as the Koch Industries PAC, which gave $201,500 to 36 members of the House Freedom Caucus identified by the Pew Research Center during the last election. The KochPAC gave more than $1.4 million to Republican House candidates, including its leaders.But even in cases where the same PAC backs both camps, the amounts are often lopsided, with less money going to Freedom Caucus members, many of who are relatively junior lawmakers. The Home Depot PAC, for example, gave the maximum $10,000 to scores of lawmakers’ campaigns in 2014; only one of them, Barry Loudermilk of Georgia, where Home Depot has its headquarters, is a Freedom Caucus member. Other members of the Freedom Caucus received donations from the PAC, but not for the maximum amount.Stephen Holmes, a spokesman for Home Depot, said many factors go into the company’s PAC giving, but caucus membership wasn’t one of them.The failure of McConnell’s plan to lift the caps on party spending shows how the source of lawmakers’ contributions influences their votes. Republicans generally have voted in favor of looser rules on raising and spending campaign money, especially since the passage of the 2002 McCain-Feingold law that banned national parties from collecting unlimited contributions. Rick Hasen, a University of California-Irvine law professor who studies campaign finance and elections, said it’s notable that the Freedom Caucus pushed to preserve the party restrictions.“Sometimes,” Hasen said, “self-interest can trump ideology.”last_img read more

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Two Indian Climbers Die on Mt. Kanchenjunga

first_imgKathmandu: Two Indian climbers died on Mount Kanchenjunga while descending from the summit of the world’s third highest mountain, the expedition company said on Thursday. Pasang Sherpa, Director at the Peak Promotion Nepal, the company, told Xinhua news agency that the Indian climbers collapsed at an altitude of 8,400 meters. “Indian national Biplab Baidya and Kuntal Karna died of altitude sickness while descending from the summit,” Sherpa said.Their bodies will be airlifted to Kathmandu probably on Friday, he said. A total of 23 people were in the expedition team when they left for the summit on April 6.Meanwhile, a national from Chile, Rodrigo Vivanco, has gone missing in Mount Kanchenjunga since Wednesday evening. “We have mobilized a team to rescue Rodrigo who has gone missing above Camp IV on the descent after he reportedly made it to the summit,” he said. IANS Also Read: SPORTS NEWSlast_img read more

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European Tour golf heading to Cyprus for 1st time

first_img SUBSCRIBE TO US COMMENT Associated Press Television News Last Updated: 28th August, 2020 22:32 IST European Tour Golf Heading To Cyprus For 1st Time Back-to-back events will be held in Paphos as part of the tour’s reshaped schedule for 2020, though there will be no fans for the Cyprus Open from Oct. 29-Nov. 1 and the Cyprus Classic from Nov. 5-8. WATCH US LIVE Written Bycenter_img First Published: 28th August, 2020 22:32 IST LIVE TV The European Tour is heading to Cyprus for the first time.Back-to-back events will be held in Paphos as part of the tour’s reshaped schedule for 2020, though there will be no fans for the Cyprus Open from Oct. 29-Nov. 1 and the Cyprus Classic from Nov. 5-8.It continues the tour’s policy of staging successive tournaments in geographical clusters to reduce the need to travel amid the coronavirus pandemic.The Scottish Championship also has been added to the schedule and will take place from Oct. 15-18, extending the tour’s second U.K. Swing to a fourth tournament. The Irish Open, the Scottish Open and the BMW PGA Championship will held in successive weeks before that.The first U.K. Swing, comprising six events, is being completed this week with the U.K. Championship at The Belfry.The tour also said the Turkish Airlines Open and the Nedbank Golf Challenge will not be staged this season.(Image Credit: AP) FOLLOW USlast_img read more

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Ali, Brown reunite years after Ali’s legal fight

first_imgBack Row, from left, John Wooten, Jim Brown, Bill Russell, and Bobby Mitchell stand behind Muhammad Ali before the start of the Ali Humanitarian Awards ceremony Saturday, Sept. 27, 2014 at the Louisville Mariott Downtown in Louisville, Ky. The four were participants of the ‘Ali Summit’ in 1967, and Brown will be receiving the Ali Humanitarian Lifetime Achievement Award. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Muhammad Ali was on the ropes for refusing induction into the Army, and Jim Brown wanted to help. But first, the NFL great wanted to hear the boxing champion’s reasons for not answering the call to military service during the Vietnam War.So Brown led a group of prominent Black athletes who hit Ali with a flurry of questions during a two-hour meeting in Cleveland in June 1967. Ali didn’t duck the questions and stuck to his principles, citing his religious beliefs in refusing to join the military.The dozen athletes, including Bill Russell and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, emerged from the meeting to publicly support Ali at a time when the champ was one of the country’s most polarizing figures.“People got the answers that they wanted,” Brown recalled Saturday.Nearly 50 years after the meeting, now known as the “Ali Summit,” several participants including Brown and Russell were at Ali’s side again Saturday night in the boxing champ’s hometown. Brown received a lifetime humanitarian achievement award bearing Ali’s name.While posing for photos with the 72-year-old Ali, Brown leaned over and whispered to the seated former heavyweight champion. Later, Brown said he told Ali: “You’re the greatest of all time.”The lineup of Muhammad Ali Humanitarian Award winners included Academy Award-winning actress Susan Sarandon and Grammy Award-winning hip-hop artist Common. Other award winners included a half-dozen young adults from around the world honored for their humanitarian roles.But much of the spotlight was on that meeting decades ago in Cleveland when Ali, was at his most vulnerable, and how the group of athletes joined Ali’s corner in the fight of the champ’s life. Several participants met at the Muhammad Ali Center a few hours before the awards event Saturday night. Ali, who is battling Parkinson’s disease, met the group shortly before the awards show at a downtown hotel.“No one had really sat down and listened to him and given him the respect of having him tell his point of view,” Brown said in recalling the 1967 meeting.Former NFL player John Wooten, another meeting participant, said Ali’s questioners “came at him with everything.” The man known for his brashness in the ring was humble when explaining his reasons, he said.It was enough to win over another participant, former NFL player Bobby Mitchell.“I came there ready to try to talk him into going into the service,” Mitchell said Saturday. “I actually felt that way. He whipped my behind pretty quick, because he can talk. But when it was all over, I felt good about walking out of there saying, ‘We back him.’”Ali was stripped of his world heavyweight boxing title in 1967 while in his prime and was convicted of draft evasion. Ali found himself embroiled in a legal fight that ended in 1971, when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in his favor.Ali regained the heavyweight title in 1974, defeating George Foreman in the “Rumble in the Jungle.” A year later, he outlasted Joe Frazier in the epic “Thrilla in Manila” bout. Ali’s last title came in 1978 when he defeated Leon Spinks.Long before Ali became an icon, the meeting’s participants were taking a risk by throwing their support behind him.“It was the United States government that we were dealing with,” Brown said Saturday. “Careers were at stake. And everybody that showed up at that meeting put all of that on the line. That was heavyweight stuff.”Russell, who pulled up a decades-old photo of himself and Ali on his smartphone, said the legal battle came down to citizenship rights. Russell had known Ali for years and never doubted his sincerity when citing his reasons for refusing military service. Russell said the legal fight transformed Ali.“He became a hero to a lot of young folks in this country, black and white,” the basketball great said. “Because what he was talking about was citizenship. And my citizenship, or Jim’s … is not a gift from other citizens. It’s a right of birth.”Brown, an outspoken civil-rights advocate who remains active in efforts to stem violence, improve education and uplift neighborhoods, said he didn’t want to compare the role of athletes today and in his era.“I’m here to motivate as many people as I can in this country to take a look at the violence … and the inferior education that a lot of our kids are getting,” he said.Former NFL star Ray Lewis, who joined the players from a previous generation Saturday, said Ali’s principles still resonate with young people today.“He did stand for something, and that something changed generations of young men, realizing that we all have a true freedom, a true opportunity to do what you’re going to do, say what you’re going to say,” he said. “And if you believe strongly in something, truthfully in your heart, follow it.”last_img read more

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