Tag: 夜上海论坛VY

The Marcus King Band Taps Warren Haynes For Allman Brothers Cover At Red Rocks [Video]

first_imgThe Marcus King Band made their Red Rocks debut on Saturday night, opening up for Gov’t Mule and Yonder Mountain String Band at the beloved Morrison, Colorado venue. It was the band’s first time playing the legendary stage together, though King himself joined Lettuce for Rage Rocks back in May. While still an extraordinarily young band, touring the country vigorously throughout the year, MKB’s performance at Red Rocks felt long-awaited. And boy, did they deliver!Fellow collaborator and musical mentor Warren Haynes joined Marcus King Band during their opening set, for a ripping version of the Allman Brothers Band‘s “Dreams.” Of course, the two have collaborated before, with Haynes producing and playing on The Marcus King Band’s self-titled 2016 album. The ABB theme continued through Gov’t Mule’s headlining set, when King emerged to close the first set with “Whipping Post,” then returned again for an encore with members of Yonder Mountain String Band for the Mule debut of “Melissa.” The collaborators, which included YMSB’s Dave Johnston, Adam Aijala, Allie Kral, and Jake Joliff, jammed straight into “Mountain Jam,” before bringing “Melissa” to a fantastic reprise. In addition to the closing Allman Brother tunes, Mule performed “Come And Go Blues and included a “Les Brers In A Minor” tease earlier in the set–totaling five Allman covers in Mule’s set. The Marcus King Band’s opening “Dreams” truly set the tone for a fantastic night of heartfelt music from all three bands.Watch Warren Haynes join The Marcus King Band for “Dreams” below, courtesy of Jeremiah Rogers:Watch Marcus King join Gov’t Mule for “Whipping Post,” courtesy of kellypearson1000:Watch Marcus King, Dave Johnston, Adam Aijala, Allie Kral, and Jake Joliff join Gov’t Mule for “Melissa”>”Mountain Jam”>”Melissa” below, courtesy of D Ragoose:See below for Paul Dumah Morgan’s depiction of MKB’s Red Rocks debut:[cover photo by Gary Sheer]last_img read more

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Green groups push debt forgiveness plan as means of moving U.S. co-ops away from coal generation

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):A proposal by several Democratic presidential hopefuls and environmental groups aimed at helping rural electric cooperatives transition away from coal-fired plants to renewable generation sounds relatively straightforward but, in reality, faces a number of challenges that put the viability of such an option in question.The Center for American Progress, Center for Rural Affairs, advocacy group Clean Up the River Environment and co-op association We Own It have suggested that Congress could help electric cooperatives transition to a greener generation portfolio by allowing the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Rural Utilities Service, or RUS, to forgive the outstanding debt that cooperatives owe related to coal-fired generation.As a second step, the groups said Congress could authorize the RUS and the U.S. Department of Energy to offer grants in lieu of tax credits to install renewable power capacity equivalent to that of the retired coal plants and fund related needed grid improvements. One of the proposals would make the debt relief contingent on investing in renewables.However, the potential impact of the proposal remains unclear, given that several of the co-ops with the most coal-fired generation no longer owe the federal government money. The plan also faces practical hurdles, such as gaining the support needed to change existing tax laws to accommodate the plan.The cooperative debt forgiveness and grant idea has nevertheless picked up new traction among some Democratic presidential hopefuls, including Sens. Kamala Harris and Elizabeth Warren and businessman Andrew Yang, who included one or both aspects of the proposals in their recent climate change plans.Electric cooperatives reduced their annual carbon dioxide emissions by 9% from 2009 through 2017 and have invested in 7.5 GW of wind generation and 900 MW of solar generation through ownership or power purchase agreements through 2018, according to a July report by the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association. Co-ops have another 3 GW of wind and solar generation capacity planned. But while the U.S. power sector, in general, has shifted from a coal-dominant mix to one led by natural gas, coal plants in 2017 accounted for 64.2% of cooperative-owned generation, the report said. The goal of the debt forgiveness and grants proposal is to provide the money cooperatives need to shutter coal plants and help them invest in renewables.More ($): Forgiving co-ops’ federal coal debt to promote renewables faces hurdles Green groups push debt forgiveness plan as means of moving U.S. co-ops away from coal generationlast_img read more

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Crime up over break, but rates down overall

first_imgThough property crimes jumped slightly over the past three weeks — due in large part to the absence of students — overall crime rates continue to decrease compared with previous years.A number of crimes — mostly residential burglaries, bike thefts and auto burglaries — were reported to the Department of Public Safety during the past three weeks, but DPS Capt. David Carlisle said the crime rates this winter break were the lowest they have been in five years.“We have had a very steady decline in winter break crimes since 2005,” Carlisle said.Daily Trojan | Leah TurnerDPS is attributing the shrinking crime rates to Compstat, a program initiated by former LAPD Chief William Bratton that helps monitor crime.“The main thing is measuring where the crime is occurring and really closely measuring crime, monitoring, putting it on a map and holding our supervisors accountable to address strategies that reduce crime,” Carlisle said.DPS has been consistently working to combat crime during school breaks by offering programs like the Group Initiative for Theft-prevention, which offers free parking for students in the Parking Center, which is patrolled and secured during winter break.DPS also distributes crime prevention tips to students via e-mail. Carlisle said often when crimes occur it is because students have not adequately utilized DPS’ resources.“Some of the issues that we have are that people leave over the break and don’t take advantage of the crime prevention programs we offer,” Carlisle said.Despite the overall drop in crime, Carlisle did cite one serious crime that occurred near campus, when three juveniles tried to rob a woman with a knife near the intersection of Jefferson Boulevard and McClintock Avenue.Though the would-be robbers were caught, Carlisle said DPS is continuing to work to prevent robberies.“One robbery is too many,” Carlisle said. “But we did catch them and they will be prosecuted.”last_img read more

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Quick releases email addressing diversity issues

first_imgProvost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Michael Quick, sent out a memorandum to the USC community on Monday in response to the various acts of bias and disrespect against minorities at USC.Titled “Access and Opportunity, Diversity and Inclusion,” the memorandum comes after the Undergraduate Student Government’s resolution on campus climate that was passed Tuesday and recent demonstrations on campus urging for student voices to be heard on campus diversity issues.The resolution called for action from the University administration following recent incidents related to racial bias. It specifically asked for a $100 million fund to support underrepresented students, additional resources for cultural centers on campus, mandatory diversity training and the hiring of a vice president for diversity, equity and inclusion, among other things.Quick wrote that he was touched by the student voices, both at USC and at other universities, that have stood up and called for improvement at their institutions. He argued that since its earliest days, USC has shown a commitment to diversity because of its imperative role in learning.“In the current historical context, that commitment reflects our desire to enrich learning by embracing a broad range of ideas and perspectives, our moral support for the cause of social justice, and our realization, in today’s increasingly global context, that the more diverse the community, the greater its potential for economic and cultural prosperity,” he wrote in the memorandum.When Quick became provost in April 2015, he outlined his commitment to access and opportunity as one of the four pillars he was going to focus on. He said he’s recently been brainstorming with other members of the Trojan community on ways to increase their commitment to these ideals.Quick, along with President C. L. Max Nikias and the leadership at USC, have outlined a series of steps that will improve campus climate and enhance access and opportunity.The first point said the provost is establishing a diversity task force, which will be co-chaired by Varun Soni, the dean of Religious Life, and Ainsley Carry, vice president for Student Affairs.The force will aim to gather ideas from the campus leaders on how to improve and provide suggestions to various campus units, like the Department of Public Safety and USC Housing, among others.Second, a series of open forums moderated by Professors Tara McPherson and George Sanchez will, like Quick wrote, “recognize criticism and complaint as a resource rather than as a problem.”Quick said he will be making a symposium series with community leaders sharing their stance on equity and diversity with students. In the memorandum, Quick invited students to suggest possible speakers and ideas for these panels.The task force also looks to identify diversity liaisons between the school deans and their faculty that can best address the needs of the community.“Given the breadth of this University, I believe this broad approach will be the most effective in addressing these issues,” Quick wrote.The memorandum also said a strategic planning process will chart a course for the USC community over the next several of years.USC’s Visions and Voices will also direct $100,000 of their budget per year to engage the community in diversity issues, according to Quick.Quick’s seventh point said there will be a $100,000 fund established that will go to supporting student programs and events that enhance diversity and inclusion. Another $100,000 fund will be administered through the Office of Religious Life to support programming specifically through the University’s cultural centers.The Office of the Provost will also start soliciting proposals to issue evidence-based approaches toward understanding racial bias and improving relations on campus.Quick said creating a faculty committee that will work with students and faculty to create residential diversity programs that will impact the residential college experience is another goal.Improving mechanisms that will record when unfortunate incidents do occur, so that they can be investigated and acted upon as soon as possible. A reporting button has been added to the USC LiveSafe app so that students can immediately report incidents of discrimination.Finally, Quick wrote that the leadership team at USC understands that though improving diversity is not just about the resources they can implement, taking these steps is helping USC move toward becoming a better, more inclusive school. Quick asked students to understand that the greatest form of diversity is that that comes with opinion.“We must be prepared not only to support those with whom we agree, but also respect those with whom we disagree,” he wrote. “Only in that way will we live up to the promise reflected in the faces staring out at us from those iconic photographs and create a University of Southern California worthy of them, and us.”Correction: This article previously stated that the Undergraduate Student Government’s resolution on campus climate was passed on Wednesday. It was passed on Tuesday. The Daily Trojan regrets the error.last_img read more

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