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The Breakfast Covers “Terrapin Station” In High Energy Hartford Performance

first_imgLoad remaining images In Hartford, CT last Friday, The Breakfast got together for a kickass show at Arch Street Tavern for long time fans, as well as new ones who’ve never been exposed to their jams before. The Breakfast consists of Tim Palmieri on guitar, Jordan Giangreco on keys, Adrian Tramontano on drums, and Chris DeAngelis on bass. Supporting artist, Mammal Dap, opened the evening and wowed the audience with their psychedelic tones, reminiscent of Lotus and with touches of Umphrey’s McGee influences. Tightly crafted melodies, with an 80’s throwback inflection, hung heavy throughout their set. These guys definitely brought energy to the house, prepping what was to come with The Breakfast.Right out of the gate, the main event got underway, blasting into an extended jam session, heating up the venue as temperatures dipped below freezing outside. The Breakfast’s late night set was jam-packed with auditory goodies. Trippy keys took the audience into another plane. Deep bass tickled at the eardrums while guitar flowed in and out with healthy vibes during “Pygmy Twylyte.” A playful back and forth musical dance opened up as “Tribal Funk Affliction” rolled along, before taking the flow into “Metropolis.” The band was visibly having fun with the extended jams they were throwing out to the crowd.Giangreco took charge of vocals on a double dose of Pink Floyd as the band took off with  “Brain Damage” before melding into the expected “Eclipse” for a clean flow. The second half of the set, the band was undoubtedly loosened up. DeAngelis was tearing it up on bass during “Gladys Pimp And Kangaroos With Me,” creating delicious low tones stacked with mind-expanding vibes, while Palmieri cranked out trippy guitar. Kaleidoscopic keys weaved their way in and out of the bass and guitar tones, playfully intertwining with the free spirited musical energy.Teasing the audience into thinking “Wildpack of Asscracks” would be the closer, many fans in the crowd busted into a surprising mosh pit towards the end of the tune. Then out of the hat, they pulled another song, ending the night with “Terrapin Station.” Check out the full audio from the evening below.For more information on The Breakfast, head over to their Facebook page.Setlist: The Breakfast | Arch Street Tavern | Hartford, CT | 3/3/17Set: Tunage* > Pygmy Twylyte > Tribal Funk Affliction > Metropolis > Tribal Funk Affliction, Wake Up In A Coma > Great Big Fiery Ball In The Sky, Brain Damage** > Eclipse** > Gladys Pimp And Kangaroos With Me > Tribal Funk Affliction, Wildpack Of AsscracksE: Terrapin Station****unfinished**last time played 3/19/2011***last time played 6/19/2010Cover photo credit: MKDevoWords and Photos by Sarah BourqueSetlist courtesy of simpletwistupdon.  Audio courtesy of skiprince for The Breakfast.last_img read more

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Campaign Donations Reflect the Sharp Split in Congress Among Republicans

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By Derek Willis, ProPublicaThis story was co-published with The Daily Beast.The Republican split that defines this year’s presidential campaign has been on display in Congress for years, with the most conservative wing battling party leaders on issues from spending to immigration.A ProPublica analysis of campaign donations highlights just how profound this gap has become in the House of Representatives.The analysis shows that the Republican leadership, including Speaker Paul Ryan and Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, raises money from a vastly different set of political action committees than members further to the right. In fact, the donor bases for Ryan and McCarthy are actually more similar to some Democrats than to their colleagues in the main conservative grouping, the Freedom Caucus.The fundraising disparity stokes the divisive atmosphere in Congress, reinforcing policy differences and sometimes affecting the outcome of legislation in surprising ways.For example, when a Republican-backed plan to ease a campaign finance rule evaporated in Congress, it was the most conservative GOP lawmakers in the House who joined with liberal Democrats to get it killed. ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for their newsletter. Related stories: For more of ProPublica’s coverage of politics and lobbying, check out our ongoing series, The Breakdown. The provision, which died in December, was initiated by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and was included in a must-pass spending bill. It would have eliminated caps on the money a national party committee can spend in coordination with a candidate.The caps were originally meant to reduce the amount of outside cash flowing directly to advocacy for a particular candidate. Those in favor of lifting the restrictions say they are outmoded in the increasingly wild world of campaign finance and effectively give less-accountable outside groups like super PACs more influence than traditional parties.Many Democrats argued that eliminating the caps would have opened the spigot to even more big money in politics. For conservatives, the reason to oppose the McConnell plan was different: It might have helped Republican leaders quash internal dissenters.With a bigger campaign war chest raised from donors who support mainstream Republicans, the party would find it easier to select and back its favored House candidates. “The McConnell rider provides preferential treatment to the Washington establishment,” the Conservative Action Project, a group led by former Attorney General Edwin Meese, wrote in appealing to like-minded lawmakers to fight the measure.The differences in donor bases affect other policy debates, said Dave Brat of Virginia, a Freedom Caucus member who defeated then-Majority Leader Eric Cantor in the 2014 primary and went on to take his seat. For instance, he said, conservatives lost their fight to defund the U.S. Export-Import Bank last year in part because the companies that benefit from the bank won over Republicans and Democrats who received campaign contributions from those firms.The disparity is “a huge deal,” Brat said.ProPublica’s analysis used a calculation called cosine similarity to compare each House members’ donors to others; two members with an identical set of donors would receive a score of 1, while two with no PAC donors in common would get a score of 0.The degree of similarity between Ryan’s 2014 PAC donors and those of Freedom Caucus members Justin Amash of Michigan and Ted Yoho of Florida was close to nil: 0.03 and 0.16. Tim Huelskamp, a Kansas Republican who lost his seat on the House Agriculture Committee in 2012 for his votes against leadership, had few PAC donors in common with Ryan (a score of 0.15) or any other House colleague in 2014: his highest score was 0.3, with fellow Kansan Mike Pompeo.PAC donors to House Majority Leader McCarthy, of California, were more like Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer’s (0.53 score) than they were those of Ohio Republican Jim Jordan, who heads the Freedom Caucus (0.31).The gap between the leadership and insurgents has widened since 2008. That year, McCarthy’s PAC donors were more similar to those of Michele Bachmann, the former Minnesota congresswoman who founded the House’s Tea Party caucus, than they were to PACs that gave to then-Majority Leader Cantor or then-Speaker John Boehner. By the end of 2014, the gulf between McCarthy and the conservatives was much wider: all House GOP leaders, and even 11House Democrats, had PAC donors more similar to McCarthy’s than any member of the Freedom Caucus.var pymParent = new pym.Parent(‘rankings-iframe’, ‘https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/donor-differences?layout=embed’, {});Source: ProPublica analysis of Federal Election Commission data.Credit: Sisi Wei and Derek Willis.The donors that typically back House leaders are large corporate PACs with broad interests before Congress. They include the Automotive Free Trade International PAC, which represents American dealers of foreign car manufacturers. The PAC gives hundreds of thousands of dollars to Republican candidates, of which just $11,500 went to three dozen Freedom Caucus members during the 2014 cycle. On the other hand, none of the leaders received contributions from the Citizens United Political Victory Fund, which is one of the top overall donors to Freedom Caucus members.The two factions do have some PAC donors in common, such as the Koch Industries PAC, which gave $201,500 to 36 members of the House Freedom Caucus identified by the Pew Research Center during the last election. The KochPAC gave more than $1.4 million to Republican House candidates, including its leaders.But even in cases where the same PAC backs both camps, the amounts are often lopsided, with less money going to Freedom Caucus members, many of who are relatively junior lawmakers. The Home Depot PAC, for example, gave the maximum $10,000 to scores of lawmakers’ campaigns in 2014; only one of them, Barry Loudermilk of Georgia, where Home Depot has its headquarters, is a Freedom Caucus member. Other members of the Freedom Caucus received donations from the PAC, but not for the maximum amount.Stephen Holmes, a spokesman for Home Depot, said many factors go into the company’s PAC giving, but caucus membership wasn’t one of them.The failure of McConnell’s plan to lift the caps on party spending shows how the source of lawmakers’ contributions influences their votes. Republicans generally have voted in favor of looser rules on raising and spending campaign money, especially since the passage of the 2002 McCain-Feingold law that banned national parties from collecting unlimited contributions. Rick Hasen, a University of California-Irvine law professor who studies campaign finance and elections, said it’s notable that the Freedom Caucus pushed to preserve the party restrictions.“Sometimes,” Hasen said, “self-interest can trump ideology.”last_img read more

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Sydney O’Hara’s 66-mph rise ball and abnormal bat speed propelled her to the top of the SU record books

first_img Published on May 9, 2017 at 7:42 pm Contact Josh: [email protected] | @Schafer_44 Facebook Twitter Google+ Sydney O’Hara had accepted the deal. She would fulfill her lifelong dream of playing softball at Syracuse, but as an outfielder and not in the pitcher’s circle. Despite 741 career strikeouts in high school, the SU coaching staff doubted O’Hara had the movement and control to pitch in Division I. Then, former Syracuse head coach Leigh Ross witnessed something that changed her mind.In a spring 2013 scrimmage against Saint Dominic (New Jersey) Academy at Manley Field House, O’Hara, a Cicero-North Syracuse (New York) High School senior, dominated for five innings. As Ross watched from behind the backstop, O’Hara pinpointed pitches up and down the plate and spun the ball side to side. The scrimmage ended and O’Hara wasn’t just a hitter anymore.“At that point, she knew she had nothing to lose,” said Kim Aupperle, O’Hara’s childhood pitching coach. “… So, when she got the opportunity to pitch, she had that sense of, ‘I have nothing to lose I am just going to throw the sh*t out of the ball.’”One year later, O’Hara threw a no-hitter in her first career start at Syracuse and has since averaged more than one strikeout for every inning she’s pitched. But the now-senior has also made good on the promise Ross once saw in her. The first baseman and pitcher is a national player of the year finalist and ranks first in two national categories: batting average (.480) and on base percentage (.629). She ranks second in saves (six). O’Hara enters her final ACC tournament having already overcome injury and expectation. But for O’Hara, the individual success simply won’t be enough.“She gets off on being the best,” said Kerry Bennett, her high school coach.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThough O’Hara has blossomed into a DI pitcher, she at first got looks only for her prowess at the plate. O’Hara, who tied the NCAA record with four home runs in a single game against North Carolina State on March 10, wasn’t always a power hitter. She couldn’t be, as her ambition usually exceeded her ability.The summer before eighth grade, O’Hara hung around the Gillette Road Softball Complex in Cicero, New York. On Mondays, she played in her age group. On Tuesdays and Wednesdays, the 13-year-old perused the field, looking to fill in for teams with players up to 18 years old wherever someone needed an extra player. But on Thursdays, O’Hara took her biggest jump.She played second base and right field for teams in the 23-and-under league that needed the extra bat. She didn’t swing away against competition nearly twice her age, so she turned to slap-hitting. She refined the technique as an eight-year-old when she was a self-described “tiny little thing.”At the direction of Bennett, who eventually coached O’Hara for four years at Cicero-North Syracuse, O’Hara switched from batting on her natural right side to the left side of the plate to slap hit. Bennett assured O’Hara and her father, Jim O’Hara, that the switch would be beneficial. Whether O’Hara stayed small and speedy or stopped slapping all together, coaches love lefty hitters.“I like to challenge myself,” O’Hara said. “Obviously, I would get really frustrated if I struck out or bobbled a ball in the infield. … But my parents kept me sane and said, ‘Well, you are playing against college girls, don’t beat yourself up over it.’”***Ally Moreo | Photo EditorAs she sought better competition, O’Hara looked for ways to get better herself. Aupperle introduced the seventh grader to “the spinner,” a tool usually used by high school pitchers to increase crucial movement on pitches.“I handed it to her and said, ‘You are not going to like this until you really understand it,’” Aupperle recalled.The hockey puck-like disk has two laces on it, matching those on a softball, and its visible rotation makes movement easier to track. When throwing a curve, the disk should spin flat like a pancake. With a riser, it should spin vertically end over end. If the spinner wobbles, the pitcher’s fingers are too rigid, Aupperle said, and she needs a looser grip.The spinner gatewayed to the curveball and rise ball in O’Hara’s arsenal. She made one of her first pitching appearances for C-NS while she played varsity as an eighth grader. Bennett took O’Hara out of her standard spot in the outfield to save his more valuable arms for the looming playoff run. O’Hara doesn’t remember how many runs she let up at Liverpool that day, but she remembers getting “hit around pretty well.” She wasn’t ready yet. She hadn’t mastered the spinner.“The better her spinner got the better her pitches got.” Aupperle said. “It was almost like an addiction. The better her spins would get, the flatter the spinner looked, the more she wanted to keep doing it.”In the meantime, O’Hara provided value by knocking around other pitchers herself. She hit her first of 25 career homeruns for Cicero-North Syracuse in a game she wasn’t supposed to play in. Bennett originally told the freshman she wouldn’t be playing against Henninger (New York) High School. But no run production arrived from his starters, so Bennett summoned O’Hara from the bench. That day, she didn’t slap hit as she usually did. The lefty swung away and batted in all four runs for C-NS, including her first home run, in a 4-0 victory.“The thing that was most noticeable when she was younger … was the sound of the bat hitting the ball was a lot louder than the others,” Bennett said. “She gets everything together on a swing and maximizes the bat speed. You don’t have to see it, you can hear it.”The sound comes as a product of O’Hara’s tireless work with her father at Gillette. It’s a place that, if the fields are locked, the two call a little league coach and soon they become available. The O’Hara’s four-day-per-week routine begins with swings off the tee and progresses to Jim soft-tossing from 10 feet away. There, over the years, O’Hara has practiced throwing her hands fully through the zone against outside pitches and learned to either take the pitch opposite field or foul it off in hopes of a better pitch to hit.O’Hara needed those lessons, particularly entering her senior year of high school. C-NS had fallen in the state championship game three years in a row. After her junior year, C-NS fired Bennett after an alleged bullying scandal. Prior to the season, O’Hara, a senior captain, met with new head coach Mary Beebe. She told Beebe the team had unfinished business, and she wasn’t going to leave high school without winning the state title.The first baseman and pitcher was now best equipped to deliver on that promise. Though she rolled her eyes at each training session with Aupperle as she broke out the spinner, it had helped O’Hara finally break through into a starting role in the circle. She had won central New York Player of the Year her sophomore and junior years, but she never won the team award she wanted most.To bring the team closer than it had been in years past, O’Hara organized team bonding events such as pasta dinners throughout the season prior to games. She sat down with Beebe four or five more times during the season to make sure things were going according to plan.Her final season with C-NS ended the way the previous three hadn’t. O’Hara struck out 12 batters in seven innings and hit two homeruns to beat East Meadow (New York) High School and win the state title.***Ally Moreo | Photo EditorAs a freshman at Syracuse, O’Hara posted a 3.83 earned run average and hit .333 before hitting a road block in her sophomore season. At first, she told the coaching staff her arm was just getting tired and needed rest. But the soreness in her throwing elbow worsened with each outing and her right hand swelled up like a balloon midway through the season. O’Hara thought she had a blood clot, but the sonogram came back negative. Doctors diagnosed her with an MCL tear in her right elbow.She was shut down for nearly a month in 2015, but even upon her return against North Carolina, the sophomore struggled to find her old success. She allowed 13 runs in her final 5.1 innings pitched of the 2015 season.Over the next six months, O’Hara wasn’t allowed to pitch or workout her upper body. Her exercise was limited to running for the summer leading into her junior year.O’Hara’s inability to train in the offseason showed on the field. She posted her worst batting average, .272, in a single season at SU and only managed to throw 62 innings in the entire season with her arm still limited by the injury.“She set her mind to it mentally that was she going to leave Syracuse on a high note,” Jim said. “She told me that before the summer (after junior year), because she was a little disappointed.”Syracuse strength and conditioning coach Will Hicks pushed O’Hara into the best shape of her life, she said, headed into her final season. The utility player spent all but three or four days the entire summer at Manley Field House training with Hicks. Over Thanksgiving break, she completed “workout bingo,” choosing five workouts in a row off a board — including gasser sprints, ab workouts, and stair master routines, among others — to spell out “bingo.” During winter break, O’Hara completed all 25 workouts, blacking out the board and earning a deduction of one gasser off her conditioning test as a reward.The workouts prepared O’Hara for a historic season. She set a program record for career saves (11) as she compiled more strikeouts this year, 125, than in her last two seasons combined. In the week following her four-home run game, she became the first Syracuse athlete to win ESPNW player of the week, while also having her highlights featured on SportsCenter’s Top 10.“The game knows what you do,” Bosch said. “I think the game is giving back to her this year for all the time she’s put in over her years here and even before her time here.”***Ally Moreo | Photo EditorThe player who wasn’t supposed to pitch at Syracuse was reluctant to reflect on her SU career before it ends. When her father mentioned the looming final home game of O’Hara’s career, his daughter quickly noted her focus is on the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament and not the end of her career. It’s the way O’Hara has always been.Now, the girl from Cicero-North Syracuse can’t help herself but peek back. She maintained numbers that she said don’t mean much to her, but that represent one of the most impressive stat lines in program history. And all she wanted to do was be here.“(It was always about) just being local and showing my teammates and younger girls that anything is possible,” O’Hara said, tears leaking from the corners of her eyes. “Whatever you work toward and put your mind to, it will happen.” Commentslast_img read more

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Jeremy Lin suffers ankle injury in practice, status questionable for Sunday

first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error If things keep going the way they are for the Lakers, they might have to hold an open tryout for point guards.Jeremy Lin became the latest player to catch the injury bug when he suffered a sprained left ankle during the team’s 5-on-5 workouts after being stepped on by Robert Sacre. Lin left the court on his own power and will be re-evaluated today before the team’s game against Golden State at Citizens Bank Arena in Ontario.“It depends on how he feels because he’s still trying to get acclimated to what we’re doing here,” Lakers coach Byron Scott said. “Obviously the more he plays and he’s out there, the better for him, but if (his ankle) is tender, we’ll probably sit him down.”Lin’s injury comes on the heels of Jordan Clarkson suffering a strained left calf muscle against Golden State on Thursday. Clarkson is expected to miss a week and was restricted to drills following practice. “We’re just going to get healthy and get ready for these last preseason games so we can be healthy for the regular season,” said Clarkson.Young returnsNick Young looked like his usual self bouncing around Lakers practice, save for the sling on his right arm that forced him to shoot and dribble left-handed.Young made his first appearance since tearing the radial collateral ligament in his thumb while guarding Kobe Bryant earlier this week. He ran sprints with the team following their scrimmage but was mostly on the sidelines practicing on his own.“It’s tough, but I’m fighting through it,” Young said.Young wore a heavy cast on his thumb that he said won’t be removed for another five weeks. He is expected to return in six to eight weeks, and in the meantime he’s learning to adjust with his off hand.“I can’t tie my shoelaces or put my clothes on without help,” he said.At the same time, his good mood was still intact. He participated in the team’s final sprints at the end of practice despite trying to duck away when Scott was looking for him.“I was tired from running earlier and was hoping coach didn’t see me, but he did out of the corner of his eye,” Young said.Hello old friend, we meet againTonight the Lakers will face Golden State for the second time in four days and will look to avenge a 120-105 defeat suffered at Staples Center on Thursday.Scott said that the meeting is just another chance for the Lakers to measure themselves against a good team as well as see if they applied the lessons learned in the first meeting.“We know how to play them and we’ll get a chance to see if we improved in some of the areas that we felt we need to improve on,” Scott said.center_img The good news was that Xavier Henry returned to practice after missing a week due to back spasms. Although Henry will not be available tonight, Scott said it was encouraging to see him go through drills and 5-on-5 workouts.“He was rusty and obviously been a while since he’s been on a basketball court, but having him out there was a good sight to see,” he said.Steve Nash, who did not suit up on Thursday, also participated in practice except for parts of the team’s final scrimmage when he went in for treatment. Scott said that he was unsure if Nash or Kobe Bryant would play tonight, but if both feel as fine as they did after practice, they could be called upon depending on Lin’s status.“This is still relatively a new team, so I want them to play together as much as possible. We’ll just have to wait and see,” Scott said.In the meantime, the Lakers are hoping to survive the rest of the preseason without another major injury. Clarkson said afterwards it was weird to see one guard after another go down but focused on the bright side, that it happened now rather than later.last_img read more

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No bad blood with Norwich over Grabban pursuit, insists Bournemouth boss Howe

first_img1 Eddie Howe Eddie Howe has dismissed suggestions of a rift between Bournemouth and Norwich.Howe’s team travel to Norwich on Saturday for their first Premier League fixture since the conclusion of the summer transfer window, towards the end of which they attempted to sign Norwich’s Lewis Grabban.The Canaries rejected bids from Bournemouth for the striker, but Grabban later walked out of the team hotel before the Capital One Cup victory over Rotherham and was consequently suspended for a breach of discipline.The striker remained at Norwich, and the Cherries instead recruited Glenn Murray from Crystal Palace.Despite the potential disruption caused to one of their rivals, however, and the fact that Saturday’s fixture comes so soon after that particular episode, Howe sees no reason why there should be any antipathy between the two clubs.“I don’t see why we should, to be honest,” said Howe when asked if his team can expect a negative reception at Carrow Road.“Certainly not from our side, and of course we hope from their side. We’re competitors, we’re two teams that were in the same league last year and fought a really good battle to try and get out of the Championship, and both sides were successful. And now we’re going against each other in the Premier League it should be a good match.“They’ve made a decent start [to the season]. It’s always tough when you come up to a new league, to know how you’re going to update to the challenges that you’re faced with. But I think they proved, going to Sunderland and winning, and getting a good draw against Stoke, that they’re going to be competitive this year, I’ve got no doubt about that.“They’ve got a good squad of players and they’re very well managed, that’s obvious, so we’re expecting a tough challenge.“I don’t think it’s right to speculate or to talk about other people’s players.“This game gives us a good marker, to see how much we’ve improved during the summer to now.”last_img read more

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BALLYBOFEY AND STRANORLAR LADIES GOLF NOTES

first_imgBallybofey & Stranorlar Ladies Golf NotesResults from the recent 18 holes Stroke event, staged on Wednesday, April 27th – 1, break of tie, Mary McHugh, 68 nett; 2, Ann Glancy 68; gross, Margaret McConnell; 3, break of tie, Kay Stewart 69; 4, Elizabeth Hamilton, 69.‘2s’ were carded by Deirdre Kelly at the 14th and Mary Brogan at the 6th The Lady Captain’s Outing to Strandhill, Co. Sligo, takes place this Sunday, May 8th. Bus will leave the clubhouse at 9.00 a.m. sharp.BALLYBOFEY AND STRANORLAR LADIES GOLF NOTES was last modified: May 7th, 2011 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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