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The String Cheese Incident, Garaj Mahal, Oteil Burbridge & More To Play Element Music Festival

first_imgBritish Columbia’s Element Music Festival is celebrating the grand opening of the Snug Lake Amphitheatre in British Columbia, Canada on August 3-6, 2017 with their biggest lineup to date. So far slated are The String Cheese Incident, the return of Garaj Mahal, Steve Kimock & Friends, Genetics, Five Alarm Funk, Brickhouse, Big Easy Funk Ensemble, and more. Element has also announced three artists-at-large for 2017’s event, including steel guitar virtuoso Roosevelt Collier, Dead & Company master bassist Oteil Burbridge, and sitarist/multi-instrumentalist Naryan Padmanabha.Nestled in a place where the mountains meet the sky, the valleys, forests, and untamed wilderness that goes as far as the eye can see, the new venue is encompassed by endless trails for hiking and mountain biking, a clear alpine lake to cool down in during the day, and amazing live music to fill your soul all night long.The Element Music Festival is the culmination of three Deadheads with decades worth of experience in the music business who essentially “quit their day jobs” to make dreams come true. Upon finding an incredible 160-acre piece of property that featured a natural concert bowl amphitheatre, extensive parking, camping, and a lake, the three purchased the property and began developing. The 2017 Element Music Festival is the grand opening of this new concert venue.last_img read more

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Lauding journalism’s ‘watchdog role’

first_img“All governments lie.” That was the stark observation that Ann Marie Lipinski, curator of the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard, opened with on Thursday, quoting crusading muckraker I.F. Stone from more than 40 years before.She was addressing a packed Tsai Auditorium audience, gathered for the presentation of the I.F. Stone Medal for Journalistic Independence to documentary filmmaker Laura Poitras, as well as the first I.F. Stone Lifetime Achievement Award to broadcast journalist Amy Goodman. Both awards celebrate Stone’s belief in what Lipinski, quoting Stone again, called “the watchdog role of journalism.”A visual artist and journalist, Poitras has created a documentary film trilogy about post-9/11 America that culminated with “Citizenfour” about document leaker Edward Snowden and National Security Agency surveillance. Working with journalist Glenn Greenwald, she interviewed Snowden in Hong Kong and helped make public his disclosures about governmental monitoring of citizens. “Citizenfour” has been nominated for an Oscar in the documentary feature category.Broadcast journalist Amy Goodman received the first I.F. Stone Lifetime Achievement Award. “I see the media as a huge kitchen table that we sit around and debate and discuss the issues of the day. To do less,” Goodman concluded, “is a disservice to democracy.” Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerThe I.F. Stone Medal, created in 2008, is presented annually to a journalist whose work captures the spirit of journalistic independence, integrity, and courage that characterized I.F. Stone’s Weekly, which published from 1953 to 1971.Goodman is the host and executive producer of “Democracy Now!,” a daily news program that airs on more than 1,300 radio stations worldwide. Since founding the program 19 years ago, Goodman has broken such global stories as the massacre of East Timorese by the Indonesian Army, focusing on alternative — and often unheard — voices.Accepting her award, Goodman discussed the importance of reporting by talking to citizens, rather than to corporate or government spokespeople. “When you hear someone speaking from their own experience, whether it is a Palestinian child or an Israeli grandmother, an uncle in Iraq or an aunt in Afghanistan, it challenges stereotypes,” she said. “You begin to understand where they are coming from.”Stressing the participatory nature of journalism, she talked about the shared responsibility of the media and the public. “I see the media as a huge kitchen table that we sit around and debate and discuss the issues of the day. To do less,” she concluded, “is a disservice to democracy.”The presentation was followed by a brief panel discussion, moderated by Tom Ashbrook, host of NPR’s “On Point” and a former Nieman Fellow. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerA largely visual artist, Poitras chose to illustrate her acceptance with clips from “Citizenfour.” These focused on how Snowden reached out to her because of her previous documentary work, how she partnered with Greenwald and others, and finally how government forces in Europe and the United States have attempted to squelch their work. Her goals, she explained, are twofold. Using “visual journalism” to document how this nation has changed since Sept. 11, 2001, she has sought “to create a primary document — to record history — and then to try to bridge the gap, combine what we know with what we feel.”“We’ve entered a moral vacuum in the post-9/11 era,” said Poitras, citing not only the widespread NSA surveillance but also the detainments of terrorism suspects at Guantanamo and other abrogations of civil liberties. With her work, she is fulfilling a responsibility “to respond to that moral vacuum,” she said. “To say something.”The presentation was followed by a brief panel discussion, moderated by Tom Ashbrook, host of NPR’s “On Point” and a former Nieman Fellow. Questions ranged from speculation about Snowden’s future (he has applied for asylum in dozens of countries, said Poitras) to the role of the public.“As citizens, there are certain things we’re obligated to speak out against,” Poitras responded, while Goodman brought up the case against Julian Assange. “He laid the groundwork for Snowden, and he has clearly risked his freedom,” she said, pointing out that he remains “holed up” in the Ecuadorean embassy in London, where he has received asylum.Ultimately, talk returned to the role of journalism and the prizewinners’ future plans. “Our job is to go to where the silence is,” concluded Goodman, “to show what is happening on the ground.”last_img read more

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Morata Close to Joining Atletico on Loan

first_img“I’ve spent days waiting for this,” Morata told reporters in Spain.The 26-year-old signed a five-year contract when he joined Chelsea for a then club record £60m fee in July 2017.Chelsea have since broken their transfer record by spending £71m keeper Kepa Arrizabalaga from Athletic Bilbao.Morata has made 47 Premier League appearances for the Blues, scoring 16 times. His last start was against Nottingham Forest in the FA Cup on 5 January.“The past is the past, and it cannot be changed, and I’m very proud of it,” added Morata, who was at Atletico as a youngster before signing for city rivals Real.“I am looking forward to everything being completed so I can start training with my team-mates.“I began my career at Atletico and the people who know where I come from and know my history know what this means for me.”Atletico Madrid, who are second in the La Liga table, have allowed Portugal winger Gelson Martins, 23, to join Ligue 1 Monaco on loan until the end of the season Chelsea striker Alvaro Morata said on Sunday he had passed a medical at Atletico Madrid and is “looking forward” to returning to Spain.According to reports, Morata is to sign an 18-month loan deal in the Spanish capital – 18 months after leaving Real Madrid for Chelsea.His imminent departure follows the arrival of Juventus striker Gonzalo Higuain on loan to Chelsea. Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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PVLA prepares key arguments for its first day in Supreme Court

first_imgThe hearing in B.C. Supreme Court is scheduled to begin at 10:00 a.m., and while it’s unclear how long the proceedings will run, a similar Treaty 8 case against the same project is scheduled to begin before the same judge on Thursday.In addition, beginning with the PVLA on July 20, four groups – including Treaty 8 and two Alberta First Nations – intend to challenge Ottawa’s approval of the Site C project in Federal CourtLandowner Association President Ken Boone says part of the key argument his group intends to present in Supreme Court is the manner is which the province issued the Environmental Assessment Certificate.- Advertisement -“That all goes back to the joint review panel,” says Boon. “They had their mandate, and of course some of their key recommendations were on the need, and the cost, and the alternatives to Site C.”He says the province responded by essentially ignoring the recommendations, saying they’re outside of the panel’s scope.Boon says the key argument in Federal Court will be somewhat different; whereas in that case, the Federal Environment Minister actually agreed that much of Site C’s impacts will be irreversible.Advertisement “The final say on it though went to Cabinet,” Boon goes on to explain. “Cabinet just basically said, ‘Yea but the benefits outweigh the negatives and we’re going to go ahead with it,’ but they don’t really show their rational and their real reasoning on how that critical decision was reached.”Meantime it remains to be seen if the legal action blocks construction – now expected to be begin on June 21 – but B.C. Hydro is also still facing stiff opposition from organized labour over its plan to build the dam with both union and non-union labour.last_img read more

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