Tag: 南京辰龙吧

The Arctic Monkeys Are Currently Back In Sheffield Working On A New Album

first_imgGet stoked for what’s to come with their timeless debut album, Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not: It’s been three years since we’ve heard from the Arctic Monkeys. After touring in support of their fifth studio LP AM in 2013, the band members redirected their focuses to side-projects. But now, the British rockers have shared the news that they are indeed writing a new album. While only in the beginning processes, this news is very exciting as the band returns home to Sheffield, England to write the new album.According to a tweet from BBC’s Shamir Masri, “Alex Turner [said] during an interview for BBC Sheffield [that] they are coming back to Sheffield to pen a new album… It IS happening!” While the process might be slow, it’s definitely in the works — as the tweets below indicate. The boys are back in town!Arctic Monkeys back in Sheffield. Buzzing man gotta get the new album out now @monkeysquote #arcticmonkeys #sheffieldissuper pic.twitter.com/TVvPmEx2Ti— Tom (@1892AnfieldRoad) December 9, 2016last_img read more

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Harvard in the military

first_imgTwo Marines are aboard ship in the Mediterranean, readying their platoons for combat. Another just returned from seven months of intense fighting in Afghanistan. One Army officer is now a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford. Another just learned an Afghan language. One Navy ensign has traveled the world and steered a battleship through a storm. Another is a student pilot in Florida.These are just a few updates on the Harvard College graduates who in 2009 and 2010 left school as newly commissioned officers in the Army, Navy, and Marine Corps.Marine 2nd Lt. Daniel West ’09 is now aboard a speedy amphibious ship in the Mediterranean Sea. With him on the USS Mesa Verde is 2nd Lt. Domenico Pellegrini ’09, a friend since their freshman year at Harvard. Both are platoon commanders with the ground combat element of the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit, poised “for any crisis that may arise,” said West, “whether humanitarian aid or kinetic combat action.”Another 2009 classmate and marine infantry platoon commander is 2nd Lt. Joseph Kristol, who just returned from Afghanistan, “where his battalion saw some of the ugliest fighting to date in that country,” said West. Kristol serves with the 3rd Battalion, 5th Regiment — “3/5” — based at Camp Pendleton near San Diego. Last September, the unit arrived in the Sangin district of Helmand province, where Taliban flags flew everywhere, schools were closed, and local markets abandoned. Ahead of the 3/5 was a violent, seven-month grinder of combat — and the heaviest unit casualties so far in Afghanistan: 25 marines killed and close to 200 wounded.“It is truly a privilege to serve with Marines in combat,” wrote Kristol, who coordinated fire support for his company — and had to write letters home to the parents of two machine gunners killed in action. “Unfortunately, I learned firsthand that privilege has a huge price.”The Taliban flags, by the way, are gone.From their ship, West and Pellegrini struck a common chord with other Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) students who graduated from Harvard recently: They are grateful that relations have improved between their alma mater and the military. “It has been special to see the significant growth in relations between Harvard and the military since my freshman year,” wrote Pellegrini, “and I am lucky to have been a small part of it.”Navy Ensign Joshua Foote ’10 echoed that sentiment, saying, “I’m absolutely thrilled about the recent developments in Harvard’s relationship with the military, and very excited to hear that the Navy is re-establishing an ROTC program there.”On March 4, Harvard President Drew Faust and Navy Secretary Ray Mabus signed an agreement that will re-establish an ROTC formal presence on campus for the first time in nearly 40 years.“Our renewed relationship affirms the vital role that the members of our Armed Forces play in serving the nation and securing our freedoms, while also affirming inclusion and opportunity as powerful American ideals,” Faust said at the time. “It broadens the pathways for students to participate in an honorable and admirable calling and in so doing advances our commitment to both learning and service.”Under the agreement, Harvard will resume full and formal recognition of Naval ROTC on the effective date of the repeal of the law that disqualified openly gay men and lesbians from military service, which is expected to happen this summer.Foote is stationed in Yokosuka, Japan, as a combat information center officer aboard the USS John S. McCain, a guided-missile destroyer. “The best way to explain,” he said of his job, “is to think of the dark, neon-lit room you see in the movies that’s full of radar screens and people talking on radios and drawing on boards.” He said, “I own that room, and about half of the sailors who work in there work for me.”Foote has “been to Japan, South Korea, the Philippines, and Vietnam, and sailed in the Pacific Ocean, the Sea of Japan — and the Philippine, Yellow, East China, South China, and Sulu seas,” he wrote. “I have personally driven a multibillion-dollar warship a mile behind an aircraft carrier, at night, in the rain, with F-18 Hornets screaming overhead. … I’ve seen more stars in the night sky than can be seen anywhere on land, and the most beautiful sunsets you can imagine.”Foote participated in the rescue effort following the earthquake and tsunami that recently struck Japan, and was part of the emergency mobilization after North Korea fired artillery shells into a South Korean town last year. All this, and more, happened less than a year after he wrote his last term paper and took his last exam.Two of his 2010 classmates, also Navy ensigns, are in flight school in Florida: Christi Morrissey and Michael Kaehler.While waiting for flight training to start, Kaehler lived the peripatetic life of a young officer. He worked briefly at an ROTC unit at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where since 1976 Harvard students have taken their cadet military training. Then he worked as a Navy recruiter in San Francisco before reporting to Pensacola in September, “about the same time I would have finished my study card for the fall semester,” wrote Kaehler.U.S. Navy Ensign and aviation trainee Michael Kaehler (third from left) poses last fall in Pensacola, Fla., with classmates from his Aviation Preflight Indoctrination (API) course. Kaehler is a 2010 graduate of Harvard College. Photo courtesy of Michael KaehlerHe has since learned to pilot a Cessna 172, studied weather, flight rules, and the basics of aerodynamics, and has gone through survival training. “The most fun, surprisingly,” said Kaehler, was “getting strapped into a mock helicopter and dropped into a pool while blindfolded to practice escaping underwater from an aircraft.” He is now 12 flights into training on a turboprop T-34C, and will tackle aerobatics, night flight, and other requirements.Army 2nd Lt. Roxanne Bras ’09 is tackling intellectual aerobatics as a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford. Still an active duty officer, she will graduate with an M.Phil. in international relations in 2012. From February through August of last year, Bras was deployed to Afghanistan as an officer in an engineering unit. In one picture, she had an M-16 slung on her back. But toward the end of her time in that country, Bras worked on issues involving Afghan women.Army 2nd Lt. Roxanne Bras, Harvard College Class of 2009 and now a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford, served from February through August 2010 with an engineering unit in Afghanistan. Bras (left) is administering an oath to a noncommissioned officer who re-enlisted. Photo courtesy of Roxanne BrasTravel, adventure, and challenge have come in all shapes for the eight Harvard ROTC graduates of 2009 and the 11 commissioned in 2010.Army 2nd Lt. Josué “Josh” Guerra ’10 trained for three months last fall at the Muscatatuck Center for Complex Operations in Indiana. He was learning Dari, one of the major languages of Afghanistan. Since February, he has been at Fort Benning, Ga., to learn squad- and platoon-level tactics, which are “mentally and physically demanding,” he wrote, “though not overwhelming.” Guerra will report for duty at Fort Drum, N.Y, home of the 10th Mountain Division, a light infantry unit.Marine 2nd Lt. Talya Havice ’10 has completed six months of officer training, and a five-month intelligence officer course. She is headed to Camp Pendleton in a few weeks.Navy Ensign Olivia Volkoff ’10 is an engineer at Naval Reactors headquarters in Washington, D.C., where she is training on the design and maintenance of nuclear submarines and aircraft carriers. “This experience has left me totally in awe of the work it takes to take a ship from idea to construction to sea,” she wrote in an email.“It’s been a really incredible year,” Volkoff added. “It’s hard to believe it’s already been a year.”Army 2nd Lt. Karl Kmiecik ’10 has started his medical training at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School to become an Army doctor.Last October, Marine 2nd Lt. Shawna Sinnott ’10 reported to the 26-week Basic School, where new officers learn tactics and other battlefield basics.She is happy to be “directly applying the knowledge I gained at Harvard through my special concentration in ‘Understanding Terrorism,’” wrote Sinnott from Quantico, Va. “Nowhere else would I have been able to create such an interdisciplinary concentration, learning from experts in every academic field. With this basis, I am much more confident in how I will be able to approach the threat and aggressively address it.” After four months in Virginia, she will be stationed at Camp Pendleton near San Diego.Foote said his Harvard education applies to the military life less directly, but still had a powerful positive effect.“I met people from Harvard from every kind of background and learned how to interact with them and relate to them,” he said in an email from Japan. “This is essential for a naval officer.”The intensity of those undergraduate years helped too, said Foote. “The workload is high, the tempo is fast-paced, and the standard by which your work is judged is exacting. Having entered such an environment with four years worth of experience as a student at Harvard, I was able to make the transition without difficulty.”Tradition has helped too, he said. “In a less tangible way, Harvard’s longstanding history with the military has affected my service as well,” Foote wrote. “The men and women of Harvard have a tradition of service that dates to the Pequot War, and I have been and will continue to be honored to carry on that tradition.”last_img read more

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NAFCU publishes FAQ on ADA to help CUs targeted by lawsuits

first_img continue reading » NAFCU published a new FAQ document to help association members and nonmembers with concerns about the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and website accessibility. The document explains why credit unions are being targeted with legal action and what NAFCU is doing to help, among other useful information.Credit unions can download the FAQ from a message sent by NAFCU President and CEO Dan Berger yesterday or by clicking here.The document includes questions and answers on strategic options under consideration, which credit unions are being targeted by plaintiffs’ attorneys and how credit unions are responding to demand letters regarding their website compliance with the ADA.NAFCU has myriad resources available online that can help credit unions better understand and manage recent litigation risk related to the ADA. Last week, Berger provided an update to members on NAFCU’s efforts thus far to put an end to meritless lawsuits concerning website accessibility under the ADA, obtain clear guidance on the issue and help those credit unions currently facing litigation. 9SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Jamaica developing long term solutions for coffee industry

first_imgTwenty varieties of coffee being evaluated “Variety trials have, so far, been carried out on two farms… one in the Blue Mountain region and the other in the Jamaica High Mountain region. Approximately 20 varieties are being evaluated with quality evaluations slated to begin shortly,” Shaw said.Shaw’s remarks were read by Minister without Portfolio in the Economic Growth and Job Creation Ministry Daryl Vaz to launch Jamaica Blue Mountain Coffee Day and to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU).The MoU, which was signed by JAMPRO, JACRA and the Jamaica Coffee Exporters Association, establishes a formal framework to guide a promotional campaign and marketing strategy to support the Jamaica Blue Mountain and Jamaica High Mountain coffees.The Jamaica Blue Mountain Coffee Day, to be observed on January 9 between Jamaica and Japan, is being held in recognition of the formidable relationship forged between the two countries since 1953 when Jamaica sent its first shipment of coffee to the Asian country.It also marks the day the largest shipment of coffee left the port of Kingston en route to Japan in 1967.More solutionsOther solutions being examined are the implementation of a coffee nursery policy to guide the way nurseries operate, in order to adequately regulate and monitor varieties that are cultivated; and the establishment of a coffee training institute, aimed at certifying the regulatory cup testers.“The (nursery) policy is currently in its draft stage and will be completed by the first quarter of the financial year 2019. The regulatory cup testers would lead the way as certified trainers for the industry stakeholders, including coffee shop personnel, coffee makers in hotels and restaurants,” Shaw said, adding that the training institute will be fully operational by September. KINGSTON, Jamaica, CMC – The Jamaica government is examining long term solutions to place the coffee industry in a better position in the future.Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries Minister Audley Shaw, said among the solutions suggested is the reduction of infringements on the Jamaica Blue Mountain and Jamaica High Mountain coffee trademarks on the international scene, as well as locally, through the Jamaica Agricultural Commodities Regulatory Authority (JACRA).It also includes variety monitoring activities to ensure adaptability and disease resistance.last_img read more

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IndyCar Grand Prix of Alabama: Start time, TV channel, live steam for 2019 race

first_imgThe 2019 NTT IndyCar Series season continues Sunday, April 7 with the 10th running of the Honda Indy Grand Prix of Alabama, the third race of the IndyCar season. As will be the case for most of the IndyCar races on the schedule, NBCSN is the TV channel that will broadcast this week’s race. The start time for the Honda Indy Grand Prix of Alabama will be 4 p.m. ET.Barber Motorsports Park in Birmingham, 17-turn 2.38-mile road coarse with 80 feet of elevation change, again will host the Honda Indy Grand Prix of Alabama. The Firestone Grand Prix of St. Petersburg also can be streamed live via fuboTV. New fuboTV users can sign up with a seven-day free trial.Throughout the season, INDYCAR Pass will provide live streams of all IndyCar practice and qualifying sessions. The service also will provide same-day replays of IndyCar races, live streams of Indy Lights races and more.IndyCar Grand Prix of Alabama track scheduleFriday, April 5TimeSeriesEvent9 a.m. ETFormula 3 AmericasPractice 19:45 a.m. ETMazda MX5Practice 110:35: a.m. ETPorsche GT3Practice 111:20 a.m. ETLamborghini Super TrofeoPractice 112:15 p.m. ETIndyCarPractice 11:15 p.m. ETFormula 3 AmericasPractice 22 p.m. ETMazda MX5Practice 22:50 p.m. ETPorsche GT3Practice 23:50 p.m. ETIndyCarPractice 24:50 p.m.Lamborghini Super TrofeoPractice 2Saturday, April 6TimeSeriesEvent9:05 a.m. ETFormula 3 AmericasQualifying 19:50 a.m. ETMazda MX5Qualifying 110:25 a.m. ETLamborghini Super TrofeoQualifying 110:45 a.m. ETLamborghini Super TrofeoQualifying 211:15 a.m.Porsche GT3Qualifying 111:45 a.m. ETIndyCarPractice 312:45 p.m. ETFormula 3 AmericasRace 11:50 p.m. ETMazda MX5Race 12:50 p.m. ETLamborghini Super TrofeoRace 14 p.m. ETIndyCarQualifying5:30 p.m. ETPorsche GT3Race 16:30 p.m. ETMazda MX5Race 2Sunday, April 7TimeSeriesEvent9:30 a.m. ETFormula 3 AmericasRace 212:10 p.m. ETIndyCarWarm-up12:55 p.m. ETPorsche GT3Race 21:55 p.m. ETLamborghini Super TrofeoRace 24 p.m. ETIndyCarRace MORE: Watch the Honda Indy Grand Prix of Alabama live with fuboTV (7-day trial)Penske Racing’s Josef Newgarden will be considered the favorite for the 2019 Honda Indy Grand Prix of Alabama, and with good reason. Not only has Newgarden won the last two IndyCar races in Alabama, but he has won three of the last four, and those three wins are the most for any driver at the track.​ Newgarden won the IndyCar season-opener last month and finished second in the IndyCar Classic a couple weeks ago.Below is all the info you need regarding how to watch the 2019 Honda Indy Grand Prix of Alabama.IndyCar Grand Prix of AlabamaDate: Sunday, April 7Time: 4 p.m. ETTV channel: NBCSNLive stream: fuboTV (7-day free trial) | INDYCAR PassIndyCar Grand Prix of Alabama TV channelThe 2019 Honda Indy Grand Prix of Alabama will be broadcast live on NBC Sports Network as part of NBC’s TV contract, which splits the IndyCar season coverage between two networks, NBC and NBCSN.Of the 17 IndyCar races on the schedule for 2019, eight will be broadcast on NBC, and nine, including Sunday’s Honda Indy Grand Prix of Alabama, will air on NBC Sports Network. NBC will offer additional coverage of IndyCar practices and qualifying sessions on its NBC Sports Gold app.NBCSN’s coverage of Sunday’s IndyCar race in Alabama will begin at 4 p.m. ET with the start of the race.Below is the full NBC broadcast schedule for all IndyCar events in Alabama.Day, timeEventHow to watchFri., 12:15 p.m. ETPractice 1NBC Sports GoldFri., 3:50 p.m. ETPractice 2NBC Sports GoldSat., 11:45 a.m. ETPractice 3NBC Sports GoldSat., 4 p.m. ETQualifyingNBCSNSun., 12:10 p.m. ETWarm-upNBC Sports GoldSun., 4 p.m. ETRaceNBCSNIndyCar Grand Prix of Alabama live streamHonda Indy Grand Prix of Alabama practice sessions on Friday and Saturday, plus the IndyCar warm-up session on Sunday, can be streamed via INDYCAR Pass on NBC Sports Gold. As for qualifying and the race itself, live-stream presentations can be found on NBCSports.com and the NBC Sports app.last_img read more

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