Month: January 2021

Professor emeritus conceives foundation

first_img Basu was recently invited to speak at the 8th Annual Congress of International Drug Discovery Science and Technology in Beijing in October for the second year in a row. At the conference he will speak on the compounds and possible delivery methods for treatment in breast and colon cancer therapy.  Once he arrives at Innovation Park, Basu said he would apply for a patent for the liposome bullet and continue research. A synthetic liposome “bullet” was developed for the delivery of the drugs into the cells, he said. The bullet attaches to the cancer cells and delivers the medicine, triggering cell death. The foundation will be listed as a non-profit foundation, independent from Notre Dame. However, Basu will continue much of the research he started at Notre Dame, and he will also work with graduate, postdoctoral and undergraduate students. At the conference, Basu will also be working with Dr. Rui Ma, a 2008 graduate whom Basu taught.  But for Dr. Subhash Basu, retirement was an opportunity to do more work. Since 2004, Basu and his research team have isolated five compounds known to be apoptotic agents — compounds that trigger the death of cancer cells. Betulinic acid, one of the compounds, is already used as an herbal treatment in China for cancer. Basu received letters from University President Fr. John Jenkins and President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh wishing him well on his research endeavors. Basu said he and his team have published more than 250 papers on the treatment. “Ordinarily, our normal cells are born and die,” he said. “This is called ‘programmed cell death.’ Cancer cells get immortality.” Many professors might be ready to hang up their lab coats after 40 years of teaching.  “We’re going one drug at a time, to find the dose,” he said. “Then we’ll be testing intravenously to see them work. This phase will be done at the foundation.” “This could be beneficial in a drug,” Basu said. All of this, he said, will be powered through national and international grants. “The whole purpose [of the foundation and published papers] is to tell the world we’ve found different compounds,” he said.  Basu, once a professor in chemistry and biochemistry, is working on establishing the Cancer Drug Delivery Research Foundation, a foundation located in Innovation Park researching methods for drug delivery for compounds to cure cancer and more. “This May I became a Professor Emeritus,” Basu said. “My goal is to do research.” He and his team discovered the cancer cells still have the “machinery” to have programmed cell death, but it is isolated and inactive in the cell. The compounds they have created trigger this cell death, eliminating the cancer cells. “We’re going to make [the lab] bigger, establish patents,” he said. “I’ve been working on this idea for 40 years.”last_img read more

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Gay-straight alliance debate tabled for week

first_imgStudent Senate passed resolutions at its meeting Wednesday requesting the Hesburgh Main Library extend its hours and creating a formal process for selecting the Hall of the Year. Meanwhile, a discussion related to a possible gay-straight alliance was tabled until Wednesday. The resolution to extend the library’s hours asked the Hesburgh Library administration to hire sufficient staff so the facility can remain open until 2 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays. The library currently closes at 11 p.m. those days.  Student body vice president Brett Rocheleau said there have been discussions about keeping the library open 24 hours, but no conclusions have been reached. The resolution regarding Hall of the Year mandated attendance at all Hall Presidents’ Council (HPC) meetings by a member of hall government.  It also stipulated the decision to award the title of Hall of the Year will be decided by a review board comprised of two senators, one senior Judicial Council member and HPC co-chairs, treasurers, social chairs and athletic chairs. The board will allocate points to each hall to determine the winner. Ben Noe, internal affairs director for student government, said the resolution helps avoid overregulation of HPC. “I think that this is a good intermediate step to put in a procedure, but also to give Hall [Presidents’] Council some leeway about how they go about the actual process itself,” Noe said. Rocheleau said if someone believed the review board made a biased decision, a complaint could be filed with Judicial Council. Sophomore Tom Lienhoop, a member of Core Council for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Questioning Students, spoke about the need for a gay-straight alliance (GSA) on campus. “The reason we need a gay-straight alliance here at Notre Dame is partly that the environment is still largely homophobic,” Lienhoop said. “The fact that the gay-straight alliance has been denied [club status] … in the past is kind of seen by people outside the University as a homophobic act. It’s an act of discrimination.”  Lienhoop said a student-led GSA would grant more independence to the GLBT community than Core Council does. He said the organization would also provide a venue for straight allies to express their support. The GSA would be service-based, Lienhoop said. It would partner with high school GSAs to fund campaigns against teen bullying. “We could also partner with GSAs at other universities in the region to make our outreach even more pervasive,” Lienhoop said. “And service isn’t really a mission of the Core Council at all, so that’s really a detriment.”  The difference between Core Council and the proposed, more informal GSA is largely contextual, Lienhoop said. “People could just come to a [GSA] meeting once every two weeks and it would be less formal in that sense, but we could also have a campaign targeted at specific issues,” he said. “The way that Core programming is set up right now, you have to declare your sexuality or be certain of your sexuality in order to participate.” Lienhoop said this requirement dissuades students from attending Core Council events. He said the proposed GSA would not require students to declare their sexualities.  “Certainly, things that alliance does could be more lenient and more student-based,” Lienhoop said. Lienhoop said it was not practical to create a GSA as an outgrowth of Core Council. “The number of people who want to participate in alliance is far too many to sustain an organized role with an expanded Core Council,” he said.  The Student Activities Office had previously said a GSA was unnecessary because Core Council already served the functions the proposed alliance would serve, Lienhoop said. Nich Ochoa, multicultural affairs director for student government, said there are multiple clubs for students that identify as black, and all target different interests.  Student body president Pat McCormick asked if any other clubs had been denied recognition on the grounds that their purposes were already being served.  “If we are unaware of another organization that has not been allowed to [duplicate some of the functions of an existing organization], then it seems to me to be a problematic point of inconsistency to then level that criticism with a gay-straight alliance,” McCormick said. Multiple senators said members of their residence halls supported recognizing a GSA.  Senate voted to table the resolution until next Wednesday’s meeting. Rocheleau said a similar resolution is in discussion at Faculty Senate and Campus Life Council.  Lienhoop said representatives from Core Council planned to meet with Vice President for Student Affairs Fr. Tom Doyle on Thursday to discuss the creation of a GSA.last_img read more

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Student body presidential candidates square off in second debate

first_imgRosie LoVoi | The Observer Juniors Alex Kruszewski (left) and Gates McGavick (right), student body presidential candidates, participated in a debate Monday in DeBartolo Hall. The two will compete in a run-off election to take place Friday.The debate, the second of this campaign, focused on issues such as sexual assault on campus, the University’s relationship with the South Bend community and closed senate meetings.Kruszewski said he and his running mate, junior Julia Dunbar, took time to re-evaluate their platform, moving away from some of the tickets previous, big-ticket campaign platforms.“Specifically tonight, we would like to talk to you about passions … past simply flex points and Chick-Fil-A, whatever we had talked about a few weeks ago,” he said.Central to this refocus, Kruszewski said, was placing sexual assault prevention at the center of their platform.Kruszewski proposed student government continue implementation of Callisto and change du Lac to better deal with sexual assault.“Currently, du Lac doesn’t define consent for whatever reason, and that’s important because it affects victims,” he said.McGavick also laid out his and running mate, junior Corey Gayheart’s, vision for helping to decrease sexual assault on campus.Central to the ticket’s platform was expanding the blue light system, using “a map of crime across campus” to guide placement of new blue light stations.This implementation, along with the rest of their platform, had to be put into place with diverse student input, McGavick said.“I think there is an issue in that people on campus don’t necessarily feel like they understand what student government does,” he said. “One thing student government can improve is … accessibility and drawing on a diverse range of ideologies voiced around campus.” This increased transparency was part of McGavick’s stance on the issue of closed student senate meetings, he said. While McGavick said there are “certainly” some instances in which senate meetings ought to remain closed — specifically when immigrant students who benefit from Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), whose public identity could put them at future risk, speak at meetings — in many other situations, the senate needs to remain open, where it has not in the past. “There are some situations where closed senate meetings aren’t required,” he said. “ … I think a lot of people feel shut out in the process because a lot of decisions that happened in the election have been decided being closed doors, with windows papered over.”Kruszewski, referring back to the DACA case, said the issue of closed senate meetings had to be looked at in a broader context.“It’s a deeper problem than transparency, it’s inclusion,” he said “ … [DACA students] were afraid to share their story, afraid to show their face because of the repercussions and the stigma that occurs in the United States and on campus.”This message of inclusion was central to the ticket’s platform, Kruszewski said, stressing that their No. 1 priority would be the creation of a multicultural student center and pledging to try to alleviate certain systemic barriers for some students’ participation on campus.“There are passions that are not being heard at Notre Dame,” he said.The candidates also discussed their respective visions on how to better interact with the South Bend community.McGavick said he not only hoped to continue the University’s close working relationship with Mayor Pete Buttigieg, but that he also wanted to expand student access to local media.“I think we should [give students access to the] South Bend Tribune,” he said. “An easy way to understand someone else’s experience is hearing about what they’re talking about in their homes at night.”Kruszewski, who said McGavick’s media-related proposal would be difficult to implement, said he hoped students would be more willing and able to share their skills in the local community.“The South Bend community has a lot to offer Notre Dame students,” he said “ … Students [can use] their finance skills, their psychology skills, whatever it is and go out into the community.”The candidates closed the debate by thanking the student body for their time and stressing what an honor it was to serve and interact with them.“The best part of the campaign … is going door-to-door with a pen and paper,” Kruszewski said.Tags: Knights of Columbus, Student government election After a week without campaigning, suspended out of respect for those mourning the death of former Breen-Phillips rector, Sister Mary McNamara, campaigning for the student body presidential reaction resumed Monday in preparation for Friday’s run-off election.As a part of this second round of campaigning, the Knights of Columbus hosted a debate, moderated by senior Rohit Fonseca, between the remaining two presidential candidates — juniors Alex Kruszewski and Gates McGavick — Monday evening in DeBartolo Hall.last_img read more

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Professor explores Notre Dame’s St. Patrick’s Day history

first_imgSt. Patrick’s Day carries many different meanings. For the Irish, it is the Catholic feast day of Ireland’s patron saint and a day for honoring Irish heritage. For Irish-Americans, St. Patrick’s Day has become a celebration of Irish-American identity. And at Notre Dame — a school with the Irish leprechaun as a mascot — St. Patrick’s Day holds special significance, although spring break sometimes keeps students off campus on the holiday.Deborah Rotman, an anthropology professor and director of Notre Dame’s Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE), has conducted research on the Irish-immigrant experience in the U.S. and in South Bend.“The history of Notre Dame and St. Patrick’s Day actually goes back to our founding as an institution,” Rotman said.Although Fr. Edward Sorin was French, four of the seven monks who founded the University were Irishmen. In the midst of building the Notre Dame campus in 1842, Sorin had to address growing anti-immigrant sentiment toward Irish immigrants in the South Bend community. As a result, Rotman said Sorin made a point to integrate the Irish into the Notre Dame Catholic community. He established Sorinsville, a residential neighborhood around campus where the Irish-Catholic immigrants would reside together. Although Rotman said this strategy separated the immigrants from the community, she said Sorin wanted to help the immigrants integrate.“Sorinsville may seem like a form of residential segregation, but Fr. Sorin’s intent was to stabilize the workforce for the University and help these immigrants create new lives for themselves in South Bend,” she said.Despite his work with the Irish, Sorin banned the celebration of St. Patrick’s Day at Notre Dame, a decision that was justified for security reasons, Rotman said.“Most people do not know that Sorin’s decision to forbid celebration on St. Patrick’s Day was grounded in his belief that the anti-immigrant sentiment of the time was a public-safety issue,” she said. “In other words, Sorin was not trying to scorn the Irish or evade a day of festivities; he was really just trying to to protect the Notre Dame community from potential social conflict.”By the time of Sorin’s death, Rotman said the negative sentiment toward Irish-Catholics “shifted” to other immigrant groups, and Americans began to embrace the Irish much more. As a result, St. Patrick’s Day at Notre Dame involved a variety of activities. Every year, a Mass commemorated the feast of St. Patrick, the band played Irish sacred music in front of the Dome and students recited Irish poems to one another for entertainment. Classes were cancelled for University-wide concerts, banquets, football games, plays and parades.By the early 2000s, Notre Dame students had established a variety of festive traditions for St. Patrick’s Day. Some students attended the feast day Mass which features Notre Dame Folk Choir’s collection of Irish sacred music. Students dressed for class in green garb and make-shift “bands” paraded through academic buildings playing the bagpipes. Many of the dorms on campus hosted cookouts or gave out Irish paraphernalia, and the dining halls offered Irish cuisine in the form of potato dishes and cabbage.This year marked another year of a spring break St. Patrick’s Day. In fact, there have only been a handful of years in which St. Patrick’s Day has actually taken place when students were on-campus. Rotman dispelled the notion that the administration manipulates the dates of spring break to prevent a rowdy, on-campus celebration of the holiday. She noted that by rule spring break must begin the Saturday after the 39th class day.“I do not believe the administration purposely schedules spring break to avoid St. Patrick’s Day,” Rotman said. “I think the scheduling ultimately comes down to the timing of Christmas and Easter break, and they have to follow the registrar’s spring semester calendar rules, too.”Tags: Father Sorin, Heritage, immigrants, Notre Dame history, Saint Patrick’s Daylast_img read more

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Doctoral student researches history of Catholicism, American liberalism at Vatican archives

first_imgBetween study sessions, doctoral candidate Susanna De Stradis takes breaks at a small, private courtyard cafe of the Vatican Apostolic Archive to drink coffee, meet other scholars and “zoom back to the present day.”De Stradis recently started conducting research into the Vatican’s archives for her dissertation during her third year as a doctoral student of history at Notre Dame. Her investigation explores the relationship between Catholicism and principles of American liberalism like religious freedom and the separation of church and state.Her studies focus primarily on Vatican perspectives on post-war Catholicism in the United States, that is, between the end of World War II and the Second Vatican Council.During that time, the Church is learning to deal with American democracy through a closer, geopolitical relation with the United States, De Stradis said.“But also, the United States is rethinking the terms of its own First Amendment and what it implies, both in the courts, but also in Congress,” De Stradis said.The archives open at 8:30 a.m. every day. Whenever she goes to the Vatican, De Stradis arrives at the Porta Sant’Anna around 9 or 9:30 a.m. and shows her entrance badge to the Swiss guards. Then, she passes through a metal detector and heads to the archive; before entering, she leaves her belongings in a locker — even her phone.“It’s not a normal Hesburgh Library-type thing, obviously,” she said.There is no signal inside the Vatican Archive and no photos are allowed, anyway. “This slows the process quite a bit,” De Stradis added, “but it also forces you to really think critically about what you’re seeing on the spot.”Her research is being funded by a Peter R. D’Agostino research travel grant through the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism and the Center for Italian Studies, as well as by a “Religion, Spirituality and Democratic Renewal” fellowship from the Social Science Research Council.De Stradis initially became interested in the historical tensions between the United States and Catholicism when she studied history as an undergraduate student at the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa and as a Master of Arts student at the University of Pisa.“As I started to delve deeper into this kind of history, I realized there had been frictions between the Vatican and the United States, something that I was not necessarily aware of before I entered college,” she said.She called her particular interest an “exotic topic to pursue” in Italy, but not so much in the United States where she was told even sociologists, political scientists and lawyers would be interested in the questions she wanted to ask.“I was interested in the history of American Catholicism, so Notre Dame is pretty much the best place in the world to pursue this kind of studies,” De Stradis said.In fact, she said, a book that drew her to this research topic was “Catholicism and American Freedom: A History” by John McGreevy, professor of history and De Stradis’ mentor and dissertation adviser at Notre Dame.“I lived in South Bend for three years, and now the time has come to finally go do some research — or should I say come do some research — over here, in Rome,” she said.De Stradis is originally from Apulia, the “heel of the [Italian] boot,” but she said she had not been feeling homesick before returning to her country.“I can’t say that I’ve missed Italy while I was in South Bend,” she said. “I really loved the U.S. … But Rome is sort of exceptional.” Courtesy of Susanna De Stradis Originally from Italy, Notre Dame doctoral candidate Susanna De Stradis arrived in Rome Sept. 14 to study the Vatican archives.De Stradis said her plans fell into place, time-wise, since Pope Francis opened in March 2020 the archives of Pope Pius XII’s papacy — which lasted from 1939 to 1958, when World War II took place.For doctoral students, De Stradis said, their academic credentials and a letter of recommendation are often enough to apply for and gain access to the archives.“I don’t know of anyone who has applied and has been rejected for obscure reasons,” she added.De Stradis said most documents that can be accessed through the Vatican Archive were produced or received by the central organs of the Roman Curia — the different branches of the Vatican’s central bureaucracy. Of particular interest to her, though, was the collection of the Apostolic Nunciature of the Holy See to the United States.“Every kind of communication between the American Catholic hierarchy and the Vatican had to go through the Apostolic delegate,” she said. “Since I want to look at Rome’s attitude towards mainly domestic developments in the U.S., this is the place to look at.”But the archives are not as well sorted as she expected, so “you have to rely a lot on the goodwill of the personnel there,” De Stradis said. She, for one, has been collaborating with an archivist to overcome these hurdles.“He’s basically bringing folders to me that I wouldn’t otherwise be able to locate and ask [for] through the normal system,” she said.Due to COVID-19 health and safety precautions, the archives can accommodate only 25 scholars every day in a room that would normally accommodate 60, De Stradis said. But the effects of the pandemic can be seen outside of Vatican City and throughout Rome, as well.“The city is empty,” De Stradis said. There are few tourists — particularly, very few Americans — and the subway is not crowded.She said she expects her research at the Vatican and her stay in Rome will last for at least seven months.“I do realize that I’m in a very uniquely privileged position as an Italian [and] as a graduate student who’s still able to go to the archives,” she said.De Stradis arrived in Italy on Sept. 14.“Which is exactly the date I had planned to be here, so this is not COVID-related, it’s just as planned,” she said. “Again — I feel very blessed.”Tags: American Catholicism, Rome, Vatican Archivelast_img read more

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Local Health Officials Report Trouble In Properly Tracking COVID-19 Testing

first_imgPhoto: CDCMAYVILLE – Health officials in Chautauqua County say they are having trouble properly keeping track of novel Coronavirus testing.“We recommend that all county physicians and hospitals notify the Chautauqua County Health Department when a COVID-19 test is performed, but we cannot assure that we have record of every test that has been performed in the county,” said officials. “Thus, we are not able to give an accurate report of the number of tests that have been done.”However, as of Saturday afternoon, officials say there remains no confirmed cases of COVID-19. Thirty-four people remain in precautionary quarantine status and are being monitored daily by public health nurses.Health experts continue to stress the importance of following the precautionary guidelines and social gathering regulations. Complying with these guidelines will help decrease the spread of the novel coronavirus: Wash your hands (for 20 seconds) often throughout the day;Cover your cough and sneezes;Avoid close contact with others (leave at least 6 feet between people); andStay home.Officials say testing supplies and personal protective equipment used when doing a test, continue to be in very low supply, not only in Chautauqua County, but around New York State and the nation.“Please communicate with your healthcare provider’s office if you feel you have COVID-19 symptoms,” said officials. “They will assess your condition over the phone and direct your care. Just having symptoms does not mean you need tested; testing does not change the way your symptoms are treated.”Currently there is no vaccine or medication that will fight the virus.Officials are also asking residents to support local food establishments that are offering takeout, although they ask to continue to practice precautionary hygiene:Keep the suggested 6 foot physical distance between you and other people;Wash or sanitize your hands as soon as you get home and before you eat or prepare food;Wash your hands again after you unpack your groceries/food;Avoid touching your face;Only go to the store if you are feeling well; andThe CDC does not recommend wearing gloves or masks when shopping or going out to pick up food.“Stay well – make the most of your time at home; get out, move and enjoy some fresh air,” said officials. “And always, wash your hands and frequently touched surfaces.  You can wash that virus off with just soap and water.”Officials say the Chautauqua County COVID-19 Response team continues to meet daily to evaluate and respond to the rapidly changing COVID-19 situation. This team is made up of local public health and emergency response professionals. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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NY AG Renews Halting Debt Collection For State Medical And Student Debt

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) NEW YORK —New York State has renewed, for the fifth time, an order to halt collection of medical and student debt owed to the state of New York that has been specifically referred to the Office of the Attorney General (OAG) for collection.In response to continuing financial impairments resulting from the spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), Attorney General Letitia James renewed orders again from this coming Sunday, through Friday, Sept. 4, 2020. After this period, James will reassess the needs of state residents for another possible extension. Additionally, the OAG will accept applications for suspension of all other types of debt owed to the state of New York and referred to the OAG for collection.“Too many New Yorkers are still enduring the financial hardships of this pandemic,” said James. “We have the power to help tens of thousands of New Yorkers who are struggling to make ends meet, which is why we are again suspending the collection of state student and medical debt referred to my office. As we continue our work to stop the spread of this virus, we must also work to rebuild our economy and help New Yorkers get back on their feet, and that starts with ensuring our state’s residents are not unnecessarily burdened with additional debt payments at this time.”Since COVID-19 began to spread rapidly across the country in mid-March, tens of millions of residents across the nation have filed for unemployment, including more than 3.4 million in New York state alone, James said. last_img read more

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New York Casinos Set To Open Next Week At 25 Percent Capacity

first_imgPixabay Stock Image.ALBANY — Casinos and video lottery terminals are set to reopen next Wednesday, but at only 25 percent capacity, according to Gov. Andrew Cuomo.Cuomo announced casinos and video lottery terminal facilities will be allowed to reopen, but all venues that choose to reopen will be subject to strict safety protocols, including strict enforcement of face coverings except when eating or drinking, social distancing, additional staff to control occupancy, traffic flow and seating to avoid crowding, and enhanced cleaning and disinfection protocols. Casinos must also have enhanced air filtration, ventilation and purification standards in place in order to open.“New Yorkers have done an extraordinary job – we flattened the curve in a way that no expert thought was possible,” Cuomo said. “We’ve made the determination that we can safely reopen casinos with enhanced air filtration and strict safety protocols including mandatory masks and social distancing. This is good news and the right next step in our data-driven, phased reopening which is working.”Casinos must leave six feet of distance between operating machines. No table games will be allowed unless and until casinos put in place physical barriers between players and the Gaming Commission approves those barriers. No beverage or food service will be allowed on the gaming floor. The State Gaming Commission will be deployed to monitor casinos and ensure strict enforcement of these measures. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Ohio, Five Other States Dropped From New York COVID-19 Travel Advisory

first_imgMGN Stock Image.ALBANY – Six states have been removed from the tri-state Coronavirus travel advisory, which requires incoming travelers from areas of high infection rates to self-quarantine for two weeks upon arrival.Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont announced the update Tuesday; New York, Connecticut, and New Jersey formed the tri-state advisory back in late June.California, Hawaii, Maryland, Minnesota, Nevada and Ohio were removed from the list in this week’s update; Puerto Rico was put back on the list after being taken off last week.There are currently 30 U.S. states and territories impacted by the advisory. The full updated list of states on the travel advisory:AlabamaAlaskaArkansasDelawareFloridaGeorgiaGuamIdahoIllinoisIndianaIowaKansasKentuckyLouisianaMississippiMissouriMontanaNebraskaNorth CarolinaNorth DakotaOklahomaPuerto RicoSouth CarolinaSouth DakotaTennesseeTexasUtahVirginiaWest VirginaWisconsinThe travel advisory quarantine applies to any person that arrives from a state with a positive test rate higher than 10 per 100,000 residents over a seven-day rolling average or a state with a 10% or higher positivity rate over a seven-day rolling average.People caught violating the advisory risk civil penalties ranging from $2,000 to $10,000, Gov. Cuomo said earlier this summer.There are exceptions to the quarantine travel advisory rules: Essential workers are exempt and stays of less than 24 hours in an area wouldn’t constitute enforcement. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Tickets Now Available for Revolution in the Elbow of Ragnar Agnarsson Furniture Painter

first_img Based on a story by Ívar and Gunnlaugur Jónsson, Revolution in the Elbow of Ragnar Agnarsson Furniture Painter answers the hypothetical question, “have you ever wondered what’s going on inside your elbow?” The emotionally charged rock love story explores a love triangle set in Elbowville, a small community within Ragnar Agnarsson’s body. Elbowville mayor Manuela (Huffman) must deal with a crisis when a “prosperity machine” compromises the peace of the sweet little community. Huffman won a Tony for her performance in The Producers; her additional Broadway credits include The Nance, Steel Pier and La Cage aux Folles. Shindle most recently appeared on Broadway in Wonderland, and has also starred in Legally Blonde, Cabaret and Jekyll & Hyde. In addition to Huffman and Shindle, the cast includes Michael Biren, Patrick Boll, Zach Cossman, Karli Dinardo, Danielle Kelsey, Graydon Long, Brad Nacht, Josh Sassanella, Marrick Smith and Jesse Wildman. Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 20, 2014 Revolution in the Elbow of Ragnar Agnarsson Furniture Painter View Commentscenter_img Tickets are now on sale for the world premiere of Revolution in the Elbow of Ragnar Agnarsson Furniture Painter, a new musical starring Tony winner Cady Huffman and Kate Shindle. Directed by Bergur Þór Ingólfsson, the tuner, which features a book, music and lyrics by Ívar Páll Jónsson, begins performances on July 28 at the Minetta Lane Theatre. Opening night is set for August 13. Revolution in the Elbow will feature choreography by Lee Proud, set and projection design by Petr Hloušek, lighting design by Jeff Croiter and Cory Pattak, sound design by Carl Casella and costumes by Hrafnhildur Arnardottir. Related Showslast_img read more

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