Category: ilzlicovnkuu

Adjunct Clinical Ast/Aso/Full Professor (68063)

first_imgThe University of Florida, College of Pharmacy, Department ofPharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy (POP) is seeking an adjunctprofessor to instruct an online course on applied pharmaceuticalresearch communications and provide curricular support.Within the POP department, we offer an online program that includesa Master’s degree and certificates in applied pharmacoeconomics,managed care, pharmaceutical regulation. In 2021, we are launchinga new certificate in pharmaceutical value assessment andcommunications. This certificate offers applied skills to translateclinical, economic and patient-reported data into accurate andcompelling communication tools used by healthcare professionals,payers, and regulators to improve decision-making and healthoutcomes.We are seeking an adjunct professor to develop and teach a courseentitled, Applied Pharmaceutical Research Communications. Thiscourse covers value messaging; payer, direct-to consumer and healthcare professional communications; regulatory writing; andpublications. This course will be required by all students in thenew certificate program but may also be taken by students pursuingother certificates or in our residential graduate school. Thecourse will be offered once a year in the Spring semester and astipend will be provided to the course instructor.Our courses are delivered online in 6-8 week compressed terms.Instructors are expected to prepare learning activities forstudents that typically include quizzes, reading assignments,recorded lectures, discussion board posts, writing assignments,projects, and exams. Our classes meet synchronously using Zoomtechnology on Sunday evenings with few exceptions.We are seeking an adjunct professor who, in addition to the coursedescribed above, can also provide curricular support in the newcertificate program. This includes advising on the content of otherrequired courses and assisting in the comprehensive project thateach student will be required to complete. This work will also becompensated through a stipend.Our program is tailored towards working professionals. As such, wevalue faculty who can deliver a rigorous curriculum whileaccommodating students with demanding careers. We also valueinstructors who make their classes applied by bringing their ownlived topical experience into the classroom. Our faculty areprovided with exceptional instruction design support from UF todeliver the highest standards of academic quality. Further, we havebeen fully online since our program started in 2006, and thus, havedeep experience to support our faculty in online education.Learn more about the POP department here .Learn more about the POP online graduate program here . The Search Committee will accept applications until the position isfilled.Interested applicants should apply online at https://explore.jobs.ufl.eduand submit: (1) a letter of interest and (2) complete curriculumvitaeIf an accommodation due to a disability is needed to apply for thisposition, please call 352-392-2477 or the Florida Relay System at800-955-8771 (TDD). Hiring is contingent upon eligibility to workin the US. Searches are conducted in accordance with Florida’sSunshine Law.#category=263The University of Florida is committed to non-discrimination withrespect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex,sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, marital status,national origin, political opinions or affiliations, geneticinformation and veteran status in all aspects of employmentincluding recruitment, hiring, promotions, transfers, discipline,terminations, wage and salary administration, benefits, andtraining. Minimum Qualifications: Master’s level degree in relatedhealth science field; Experience teaching at the graduate levelor 5 or more years of translating clinical, economic andpatient-reported data into accurate and compelling communicationtools used by healthcare professionals, payers, and regulatorsPreferred Qualifications: PhD and/or PharmD; Experienceteaching at the graduate level and 5 or more years oftranslating clinical, economic and patient-reported data intoaccurate and compelling communication tools used by healthcareprofessionals, payers, and regulatorslast_img read more

Read More

The Breakfast Covers “Terrapin Station” In High Energy Hartford Performance

first_imgLoad remaining images In Hartford, CT last Friday, The Breakfast got together for a kickass show at Arch Street Tavern for long time fans, as well as new ones who’ve never been exposed to their jams before. The Breakfast consists of Tim Palmieri on guitar, Jordan Giangreco on keys, Adrian Tramontano on drums, and Chris DeAngelis on bass. Supporting artist, Mammal Dap, opened the evening and wowed the audience with their psychedelic tones, reminiscent of Lotus and with touches of Umphrey’s McGee influences. Tightly crafted melodies, with an 80’s throwback inflection, hung heavy throughout their set. These guys definitely brought energy to the house, prepping what was to come with The Breakfast.Right out of the gate, the main event got underway, blasting into an extended jam session, heating up the venue as temperatures dipped below freezing outside. The Breakfast’s late night set was jam-packed with auditory goodies. Trippy keys took the audience into another plane. Deep bass tickled at the eardrums while guitar flowed in and out with healthy vibes during “Pygmy Twylyte.” A playful back and forth musical dance opened up as “Tribal Funk Affliction” rolled along, before taking the flow into “Metropolis.” The band was visibly having fun with the extended jams they were throwing out to the crowd.Giangreco took charge of vocals on a double dose of Pink Floyd as the band took off with  “Brain Damage” before melding into the expected “Eclipse” for a clean flow. The second half of the set, the band was undoubtedly loosened up. DeAngelis was tearing it up on bass during “Gladys Pimp And Kangaroos With Me,” creating delicious low tones stacked with mind-expanding vibes, while Palmieri cranked out trippy guitar. Kaleidoscopic keys weaved their way in and out of the bass and guitar tones, playfully intertwining with the free spirited musical energy.Teasing the audience into thinking “Wildpack of Asscracks” would be the closer, many fans in the crowd busted into a surprising mosh pit towards the end of the tune. Then out of the hat, they pulled another song, ending the night with “Terrapin Station.” Check out the full audio from the evening below.For more information on The Breakfast, head over to their Facebook page.Setlist: The Breakfast | Arch Street Tavern | Hartford, CT | 3/3/17Set: Tunage* > Pygmy Twylyte > Tribal Funk Affliction > Metropolis > Tribal Funk Affliction, Wake Up In A Coma > Great Big Fiery Ball In The Sky, Brain Damage** > Eclipse** > Gladys Pimp And Kangaroos With Me > Tribal Funk Affliction, Wildpack Of AsscracksE: Terrapin Station****unfinished**last time played 3/19/2011***last time played 6/19/2010Cover photo credit: MKDevoWords and Photos by Sarah BourqueSetlist courtesy of simpletwistupdon.  Audio courtesy of skiprince for The Breakfast.last_img read more

Read More

A new dean for SEAS

first_imgFrancis J. Doyle III, a distinguished scholar in chemical engineering at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), has been appointed the next dean of the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and will take the reins on Aug. 1.Doyle most recently served as associate dean for research at UCSB’s College of Engineering, where he instigated a major push into bioengineering. He led faculty at two colleges in developing a strategic vision for research and education and in programming and designing a state-of-the-art facility. As founding associate director in 2003 and now director of the multicampus Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies, Doyle brings together the research and educational efforts of 55 faculty spanning 15 departments and the campuses of UCSB, Caltech, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.As a scholar, Doyle applies systems engineering principles to the analysis of regulatory mechanisms in biological systems. His work includes the design of drug-delivery devices for diabetes; modeling, analysis, and control of gene regulatory networks underlying circadian rhythms; and computational analysis for developing diagnostics for post-traumatic stress disorder. Doyle also applies control schemes to nonlinear, multivariable, constrained industrial processes such as particulate systems and pulp and paper operations, and works on control aspects of sheet/film processes.Doyle has been named a fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, the International Federation of Automatic Control, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.“Frank is an award-winning teacher, a highly experienced administrator and originator of significant interdisciplinary initiatives, and a warm and gifted leader,” said Michael D. Smith, Edgerley Family Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS). “He brings to the deanship a keen understanding of the opportunities and challenges facing schools of engineering and applied sciences today; the intellectual breadth, practical acumen, and entrepreneurial spirit to move SEAS successfully into the future; and an inclusive and collaborative style that will further strengthen the SEAS community.”Doyle takes over at a time of great change and opportunity for SEAS. The number of undergraduate concentrators at SEAS has risen steadily in recent years. And the School is undertaking both intellectual and capital planning for an expansion into Allston. Last November, former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer ’77 lent his financial support to a plan to increase the computer science faculty by 50 percent over the next few years, to 36 from 24.“Frank Doyle’s distinguished career in engineering and his leadership experience at UC Santa Barbara — where he helped to develop a new intellectual vision for the school as well as a new physical home — make him the ideal choice to lead SEAS as it expands both its size and its importance in the years to come,” said Harvard President Drew Faust. “We are delighted to welcome him to the University.”“I am both thrilled and honored by the opportunity to step into the role of dean of SEAS,” said Doyle. “The faculty and students in this School comprise some of the brightest minds in the world. I am excited to work with SEAS, in collaboration with the other Schools at Harvard, as we chart the course for the future of engineering and applied sciences.”Doyle succeeds Harry Lewis, Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science, who has served as interim dean since January. “SEAS has been fortunate to benefit from Harry’s experienced leadership during this time of transition,” said Smith. “From the countless emails and other comments I have received, I know that many at SEAS and in our alumni base share my sincere gratitude to Harry for his outstanding service.”Doyle was appointed after an extensive search process with international reach and significant local engagement. “I am enormously grateful to the 16 faculty members of the search advisory committee for their insights into SEAS and their tireless review of candidates,” said Smith. “In addition, faculty across SEAS and the Science Division provided me with thoughtful input, as did SEAS staff, students, postdoctoral fellows, and alumni. From town hall meetings, individual interviews, and targeted group discussions held across campus, a clear sense emerged of the qualities SEAS was looking for in its next dean. In Frank, I believe we got them all.”Doyle received his bachelor’s degree (B.S.E. in chemical engineering) from Princeton University in 1985, a Certificate of Postgraduate Studies from Cambridge University in 1986, and a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Caltech in 1991. In 1992, he joined Purdue University as an assistant professor and was later promoted to associate professor. In 1997, Doyle moved to the University of Delaware as an associate professor and was then promoted to professor. And in 2002, he was appointed to the Duncan & Suzanne Mellichamp Chair in Process Control at UCSB.last_img read more

Read More

Student body presidential candidates square off in second debate

first_imgRosie LoVoi | The Observer Juniors Alex Kruszewski (left) and Gates McGavick (right), student body presidential candidates, participated in a debate Monday in DeBartolo Hall. The two will compete in a run-off election to take place Friday.The debate, the second of this campaign, focused on issues such as sexual assault on campus, the University’s relationship with the South Bend community and closed senate meetings.Kruszewski said he and his running mate, junior Julia Dunbar, took time to re-evaluate their platform, moving away from some of the tickets previous, big-ticket campaign platforms.“Specifically tonight, we would like to talk to you about passions … past simply flex points and Chick-Fil-A, whatever we had talked about a few weeks ago,” he said.Central to this refocus, Kruszewski said, was placing sexual assault prevention at the center of their platform.Kruszewski proposed student government continue implementation of Callisto and change du Lac to better deal with sexual assault.“Currently, du Lac doesn’t define consent for whatever reason, and that’s important because it affects victims,” he said.McGavick also laid out his and running mate, junior Corey Gayheart’s, vision for helping to decrease sexual assault on campus.Central to the ticket’s platform was expanding the blue light system, using “a map of crime across campus” to guide placement of new blue light stations.This implementation, along with the rest of their platform, had to be put into place with diverse student input, McGavick said.“I think there is an issue in that people on campus don’t necessarily feel like they understand what student government does,” he said. “One thing student government can improve is … accessibility and drawing on a diverse range of ideologies voiced around campus.” This increased transparency was part of McGavick’s stance on the issue of closed student senate meetings, he said. While McGavick said there are “certainly” some instances in which senate meetings ought to remain closed — specifically when immigrant students who benefit from Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), whose public identity could put them at future risk, speak at meetings — in many other situations, the senate needs to remain open, where it has not in the past. “There are some situations where closed senate meetings aren’t required,” he said. “ … I think a lot of people feel shut out in the process because a lot of decisions that happened in the election have been decided being closed doors, with windows papered over.”Kruszewski, referring back to the DACA case, said the issue of closed senate meetings had to be looked at in a broader context.“It’s a deeper problem than transparency, it’s inclusion,” he said “ … [DACA students] were afraid to share their story, afraid to show their face because of the repercussions and the stigma that occurs in the United States and on campus.”This message of inclusion was central to the ticket’s platform, Kruszewski said, stressing that their No. 1 priority would be the creation of a multicultural student center and pledging to try to alleviate certain systemic barriers for some students’ participation on campus.“There are passions that are not being heard at Notre Dame,” he said.The candidates also discussed their respective visions on how to better interact with the South Bend community.McGavick said he not only hoped to continue the University’s close working relationship with Mayor Pete Buttigieg, but that he also wanted to expand student access to local media.“I think we should [give students access to the] South Bend Tribune,” he said. “An easy way to understand someone else’s experience is hearing about what they’re talking about in their homes at night.”Kruszewski, who said McGavick’s media-related proposal would be difficult to implement, said he hoped students would be more willing and able to share their skills in the local community.“The South Bend community has a lot to offer Notre Dame students,” he said “ … Students [can use] their finance skills, their psychology skills, whatever it is and go out into the community.”The candidates closed the debate by thanking the student body for their time and stressing what an honor it was to serve and interact with them.“The best part of the campaign … is going door-to-door with a pen and paper,” Kruszewski said.Tags: Knights of Columbus, Student government election After a week without campaigning, suspended out of respect for those mourning the death of former Breen-Phillips rector, Sister Mary McNamara, campaigning for the student body presidential reaction resumed Monday in preparation for Friday’s run-off election.As a part of this second round of campaigning, the Knights of Columbus hosted a debate, moderated by senior Rohit Fonseca, between the remaining two presidential candidates — juniors Alex Kruszewski and Gates McGavick — Monday evening in DeBartolo Hall.last_img read more

Read More

Crazy Videos of Ruth Wilson, Brian d’Arcy James & More Before They Were Tony Nominees

first_imgRUTH WILSONSuburban Shootout, 2006There’s no doubt that Tony-nominated Constellations and The Affair star Ruth Wilson is a class act, but you’d never know it in her turn as sexed-up aspiring actress Jewel Diamond in the British TV series Suburban Shootout. Ruth, is that really you?! If you’re watching this at work, you might want to wear headphones. Or turn the volume way down. View Comments ELISABETH MOSSEscape to Witch Mountain, 1995Before Mad Men star Elisabeth Moss became a household name, made her Broadway debut and nabbed a Tony nod for The Heidi Chronicles, she appeared in a bunch of movies, including Girl, Interrupted and the 1995 Disney update of Escape to Witch Mountain at age 13. She’s cute as a button in this adorable clip where she reunites with her supernatural sibling. MICHAEL CERVERISFame, 1987The TV reboot of Fame may not have lived forever, but this 1987 clip of Michael Cerveris as British rocker Ian Ware does. The Tony-nominated Fun Home star is rocking eyeliner, crazy hair and some serious Sex Pistols vibes in the episode “Ian’s Girl.” Oh, and if you need any more incentive to watch, he rips his shirt off at 7:20. You’re welcome. BRIAN D’ARCY JAMESThe Late Show with David Letterman, 1998What do you get when you combine the NYPD with the glitz and glamour of Broadway? Cops: The Musical! In this post-Titanic, pre-Sweet Smell of Success clip of Something Rotten! Tony nominee Brian d’Arcy James as a singing, dancing police officer, James aims “to make fighting crime for fun for everybody.” Mission accomplished! HELEN MIRRENHerostratus, 1967And now, the reigning queen of crazy videos. Behold, stage and screen legend Helen Mirren in her very first film role! Before The Audience headliner won an Oscar and garnered a Tony nomination for playing Queen Elizabeth II, she played the role of a temptress selling rubber gloves in the bizarre experimental movie Herostratus. We’ll take a whole case, Your Majesty! Being a 2015 Tony nominee is a huge honor, whether you’re a Broadway mainstay like Fun Home’s Michael Cerveris, a big screen legend like The Audience headliner Helen Mirren or a small screen favorite like Elisabeth Moss of The Heidi Chronicles. But there are also some, uh, interesting early roles on these actors’ resumes. We know you’ve already seen Christian Borle’s eBay commercial and Kristin “Kristi” Chenoweth’s pageant video, so we had to dig even deeper to find these gems. Check out some wacky videos we found of Michael Cerveris as an aspiring rocker (with tons of hair!), Brian d’Arcy James as a singing cop, Helen Mirren as a sexy rubber gloves peddler and more.last_img read more

Read More

Guatemala Launches Operations to Arrest Feared Gang Leaders

first_img The authorities link them to drug trafficking and arms trafficking, and they have a strong presence in Mexico, El Salvador, and Honduras. The group is linked to 26 murders that took place between 2010 and 2012, according to the authorities. The officers moved into 40 sites in Zone 18, in the northern part of the capital, closing several roads where the suspects, believed to be leaders and members of a group of hitmen, were en route, the general secretary of the Public Prosecutor’s Office, Mynor Melgar, announced. By Dialogo May 15, 2012 “This group had connections in other places, and it’s been possible to establish that it’s a structure that had contacts in other regions of the country,” Melgar commented. Similar actions were carried out in the cities of Mazatenango (in southern Guatemala) and Quetzaltenango (in the western part of the country), where five people were arrested. center_img The operations form part of a plan by President Otto Pérez Molina, who before taking office promised to wage a frontal assault on crime in Guatemala, considered one of Latin America’s most violent countries, with an average of 16 homicides per day. Mara 18, which originated in Los Angeles, in the United States, in the 1980s, with a primarily Mexican membership, subsequently expanded its operations to Central American countries and Mexico. Youth gangs have spread in poor areas and sow terror in the neighborhoods where they operate. Hundreds of police officers and soldiers, supported by military vehicles with guns, launched a vast operation in a working-class area of the Guatemalan capital, where they arrested 13 alleged members of the feared Mara 18 gang, an official source announced on May 12. last_img read more

Read More

At the Bar’s Annual MeetingJustices discuss their role in the presidential election

first_imgJustice Harry Lee Anstead noted the positive effect Florida’s openness and cameras in the courtroom have had on other states: “I’ve had calls from 10 to 12 members of high courts.. . . One example is New York. They’ve taken up this issue of camera in the courts almost every year with their state bar. And every year, they’ve turned it down. This year, for the first time, they are going to have an experimental program in New York to have cameras in the courtroom.” “It’s important to remember that all courts are reactionary institutions,” Anstead said. “Once those cases come to the institution, we have to grapple in a workmanlike manner. Really, that’s what happened at the court. Other than the visible increase of security, we really were cocooned there in the court.. . . In a sense, all of those crisis-mode operations (when death warrants are issued) served us well in terms of conceptualizing how to address serious cases issued that had to be turned around in a relatively short period of time.” Justice Anstead At the Bar’s Annual Meeting Justices discuss their role in the presidential election Associate Editor Stuck in Homestead during the natural disaster of Hurricane Andrew. Presiding over an intense trial. Going into crisis mode, like when the governor signs a death warrant. A Kodak moment you couldn’t get wrong because so much was at stake and the whole world was watching. Justice Wells Chief Justice Charles Wells answered: “I wasn’t in Homestead for Hurricane Andrew, but I think it was a lot of the same feeling. My reaction was it was certainly a unique privilege to have an opportunity to be part of that type of event, which was certainly historical. It was much like being in a very intense trial, because you really know that storm was out there swirling. And that you were going to have to be prepared on a very short-term basis.” Justice Leander Shaw agreed: “The U.S. Supreme Court was not too impressed by our rulings, but I think they did take a leaf from our book in getting opinions out on the same day for the first time.” Justice Fred Lewis added: “The communications we received from judicial officers of other states was consistent in saying: ‘We care not what the result is, but we thank you for being open, and you’ve added a new dimension to our understanding of court operations. The second aspect was the openness. One of the letters that touched me was from a person with a military background. It started out something along the lines of: ‘I began questioning what my country was about, until I saw the court. And your court looks like my country.’ July 15, 2001 Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Regular News “And everybody in America knows about the Florida Supreme Court and credits the Florida Supreme Court as being a court that will work under conditions that are unimaginable in the appellate arena, decide tough cases expeditiously, and do it in a way that America understands.”Raoul Cantero of Miami was the first audience member to step to the microphone with a question: “It became apparent to me during the election cases that there was a surprise to the public outside of Florida how open the court was, especially how it had already allowed cameras in the courtroom. It was easy to get videos of oral arguments. What kind of influence has that kind of openness in your court had across the country? Do you see other supreme courts developing that system to allow cameras in the courtroom?”Justice Barbara Pariente got a laugh when she said: “As far as us being on camera, I thought Justice Wells had the greatest observation: Really, we had started televising our proceedings back when Justice (Gerald) Kogan was chief justice, and we had been televised regularly on the educational channels. We needed something to increase our ratings.” Wells called the televised court proceedings “a great civics lesson for all of us and the whole country. I think some people may have learned something about the appellate process by watching on television. Although, I noted there was a letter to the editor that I read that said, ‘Obviously, those justices on the Florida Supreme Court didn’t know what they were doing, or else they wouldn’t have had to ask those lawyers all those questions.’”Deleria Hendrix of Tampa asked the justices to comment on the professionalism of the attorneys who appeared before the high court in the elections cases, as well as commenting on professionalism in general, in the context of how many Bar grievances they see compared to the past.“The professionalism of the attorneys who participated in the elections cases was above reproach,” Lewis said. “You had some of the finest lawyers, and they behaved admirably. I certainly hope that the American public perceived in the manner that we did that these were fine, fine lawyers and the legal system at its best.”Regarding the overall behavior of lawyers, Lewis admitted: “There are times you are a little saddened by what you see occurring before and during oral arguments. Your final issue is that we see more than we should of cases dealing with lawyers who have gone astray. And there are a great many of those matters that are handled really before we get involved. I think it’s wrong to think professionalism is at the back end. Professionalism is at the front end. That’s where it’s going to be resolved before they get into law school and in law school. That’s the time.”Quince said until she came to the court, she really never had a real appreciation for the number of discipline cases.“Sometimes, it’s very troubling to see the number of lawyers who do have to go through the disciplinary process. I am hopeful the more we have professionalism and ethics seminars, it will help to decrease those numbers,” Quince said. At the Bar’s Annual MeetingJustices discuss their role in the presidential election The bonus to having oral arguments broadcast worldwide during the unprecedented challenges of those deadline pressures, the justices agreed, was that Florida now serves as a model for the nation on the benefits of cameras in the courtroom, and the attitude of openness at the high court with a public information officer and court web site that cater to the public’s right to know. Florida’s Supreme Court justices Those were among the justices’ descriptions of what it felt like to be caught in the whirlwind of the presidential election litigation as a member of the Florida Supreme Court. They shared their observations during the congenial question-and-answer session known as Discussion with the Court at the Bar’s Annual Meeting June 21. Pariente said the feedback the court has gotten from around the country is that Florida “has been a model, as far as openness. Whether people agreed or disagreed with the outcome, the fact that the public at large was able to see us and hear us, I think it certainly indirectly influenced the U.S. Supreme Court, as far as getting their oral arguments out in historic time, within that same day.” Justice Pariente Tony Musto, of Hallendale, asked: “I was just wondering, from a personal perspective what you went through. This is such a unique thing for a state supreme court. What was it like? I’m sure, like any of us, you would have rather the election had been very clean and decided. But was it like: ‘Oh, boy! We’re the ones doing this! or ‘Geez, I wish this was going on in Illinois!’? In the aftermath, what are your feelings? Do you get fan mail from Peoria?” Justice Peggy Quince commended the law clerks and judicial assistants who worked all hours: “The openness of the court is dependent on all the other people who work there. And what has really struck me since I’ve been there is how much everyone who works at the court truly feels a part of it and is really willing to do all that is necessary in order to get the job done.” Justice Quince Justice Lewis “I thought that was a very powerful statement about the composition of the court itself. I was very proud to be part of a system that was open. I think it served a great purpose,” said Lewis, crediting much of the court’s cutting-edge openness to the leadership of Kogan, who watched from the audience. Justice Shaw And Shaw added: “Of course, we were seeing some of the best lawyers in the country on this particular case. I have a son in law school, and he didn’t feel they showed the proper deference to the court. I had to explain to him, ‘Look, those lawyers have 20-some minutes to put their case on, and they didn’t have time to spend 10 minutes of it bowing and scraping to us.’ They had to get in and get the job done, and they did a masterful job in doing it. “Appellate practitioners thought knowing the Florida Supreme Court was one of those highly guarded secrets we wouldn’t even tell our trial lawyer partners about what the justices were like. Now the cat is out of the bag, so to speak,” said Ben Kuehne, chair of the Appellate Practice Section that sponsored the event. Ben Kuehne Shaw added: “Basically, we’re problem-solvers, and this was another problem to solve. I think that was the approach of everybody on the court. The only difference here was this was a Kodak moment, and you couldn’t get it wrong. We did spend a lot more time than we normally would, and we tried a lot harder. We had just an impossible situation because the statutes were in irreconcilable conflict. And we tried our best to reconcile that which could not be reconciled. But you did know the eyes of history were upon you. And we did have that added pressure.”Pariente admitted that the first day of the election brought not dread, but a sense of relief: “That was the day Justice Lewis, Justice Quince and myself had been up for merit retention, so we were just happy to have been retained. I think the Saturday of the Florida State, University of Florida game was a very sad day for me, because I was supposed to go to Cape Cod to spend Thanksgiving with my family.”And Wells, a Gator fan, interjected dryly of that Seminole trouncing, 30 – 7: “It was a very sad day for me.”“For different reasons,” Pariente continued, while the audience chuckled. “Not only was it an intense period, but as we reflected back on our calendar during that period in time, the 36 days, we realized that the first week of post election was an oral argument week, and the first week in December was another oral argument week. The governor had signed two warrants during that period of time, so we had death cases we were also having to attend to. Plus, we were monitoring and getting copies from the pleadings of all the other litigation that was go on.. . . If you think of the normal appellate process and how long it takes to have briefs filed, and then have oral arguments and then a decision. Then imagine that for the first case we had we ordered briefing on a Friday, briefing had to be in over the weekend. We had oral arguments on Monday, and we issued our unanimous opinion on Tuesday. Just imagine that! That was amazing!“People say: ‘Well, how did you feel after the second opinion?’ Obviously, there was disagreement among the court. But we’re used to have disagreements among one another, and we’re used to going on to the next case. Yes, it was a unique situation,” Pariente said. “Maybe this was an unsolvable problem. But as far as legal principles that were underlying the principle, those of us on whatever side we were coming from felt that we had reached principled decisions. And that’s the best you can do.”Anstead drew an analogy to the crisis mode when death warrants are issued. “As far as discipline, I think the Bar does a great job in disciplining lawyers who do go astray. The only problem that occurs, and I don’t know what the solution is, the problem with public perception of whether the Bar circles the wagon or takes complaints seriously,” Shaw said. “Perhaps the PR facet is what we need to pay more attention to.. . . But until it is shown a lawyer has done something wrong, we can’t make things public.”(Justice Major Harding did not participate in this year’s Discussion with the Court, because he was presenting a program for the judiciary in Oklahoma.)last_img read more

Read More

Broome County reports more than 100 new positive COVID-19 cases

first_img(WBNG) — Broome County Executive Jason Garnar tweeted Saturday there were more than 100 new positive COVID-19 cases. Garnar says more than 1,500 people in the county are in quarantine, and is asking people to stay home. The county tracker also says there are 9 people hospitalized, that’s the same number as on Friday. Today Broome County is reporting over 100 new positives. 373 active positives, 1500+ in quarantine. If you see a violation report it here: https://t.co/jaqtbPkiBn I need everyone to STAY HOME to reduce spread or we will be at risk of our schools and businesses being shut down.— Jason Garnar (@jasongarnar) October 3, 2020 The Broome County tracker said on Saturday there were 373 active cases. The City of Binghamton has 140, Vestal more than 60, and the Town of Union more than 35.last_img read more

Read More

Manchester Residential: Supersonic sales

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Read More

Why we must defend the institution of marriage

first_imgNews Weekly 1 Sep 2012This is the address given by the president of the National Civic Council, Peter Westmore, to the National Marriage Day Rally outside federal parliament on August 14, 2012.I also wish to express my grateful thanks to the members of parliament who have joined us here today. Our rally today has particular significance, because shortly our parliament will be called upon to vote on bills designed to change the definition of marriage. All of you will have heard the saying, “A camel is a horse designed by a committee”. I want to take that metaphor today in a different direction. Horses and camels are, in many ways, similar. They look somewhat similar. They are large animals, with four strong legs capable of carrying heavy weights. Both are able to move quickly. The bodies of both of them are covered in hair. But if someone said to you that a camel is a horse, you would rightly say: it is not. And even if a parliament were to define a camel as a horse, it would remain a camel. So it is with natural marriage, the union of a man and a woman voluntarily entered into for life, as our parliament unanimously reaffirmed in 2004, and as every society has recognised since time immemorial. To recognise this is not to demean other relationships. It is simply to say they are different. Australian law on partnerships has existed since the colonial era, and it is common to call people who cohabit — whether married or unmarried, heterosexual or of the same sex — partners. Same-sex couples are not husband and wife, and they are not married, because marriage refers to a different type of relationship.We often hear media commentators say that the push for same-sex marriage is inevitable. If we listen only to the chattering classes, we could believe this to be true. But in fact, it is not true. There were over 200 countries competing in the Olympic Games, but same-sex marriage is performed in only 11 countries, most of which are in Western Europe, and in a small minority of states of the USA. In other words, same-sex marriages are not performed in over 190 countries, including Australia, which cover around 95 per cent of the world’s population. We are in the majority.READ MORE http://www.newsweekly.com.au/article.php?id=5304last_img read more

Read More