Category: yigpxbjzjqgb

Dixie State Football Earns First Win of Season

first_img Tags: Conner Miller/Darrius Nash/Dejuan Dantzler/Dixie State Football/Fort Lewis Skyhawks/Simote Lokotui/Xavier Smith Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailDURANGO, Colo.-Kody Wilstead completed 16 of 32 passes for 327 yards, three touchdowns and an interception as the Dixie State Trailblazers bested the Fort Lewis Skyhawks 23-14 Saturday at Dennison Memorial Field in Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference football action.Wilstead judiciously spread the ball around, throwing touchdown passes to Conner Miller (3 rec, 110 yards, TD), Xavier Smith ( 2 rec, 65 yards, TD) and Dejuan Dantzler (3 rec, 59 yards, TD) in the win for Dixie State, which improves them to 1-1 on the season.The Skyhawks built a 14-0 lead at the half as Jake Lowry (17 of 34, 212 yards, 2 TD’s/INT) threw a pair of touchdown passes to Isaac Lepkee (2 rec, 54 yards, TD). Nevertheless, Dixie State took control in the second half by virtue of Wilstead’s steady quarterbacking as he averaged 9 yards per attempt and 19.4 yards per completion on the afternoon.Redshirt sophomore defensive back Darrius Nash added an interception and fellow redshirt sophomore defensive back Simote Lokotui stepped up with a pair of sacks to lead the Trailblazers’ defense.The Trailblazers again hit the road next Saturday as they face the New Mexico Highlands Cowboys at Las Vegas, N.M. in hopes of improving to 2-1 in RMAC play. September 14, 2019 /Sports News – Local Dixie State Football Earns First Win of Season Brad Jameslast_img read more

Read More

The Governor’s Week in Photos

first_img5) Centerville-Abington Elementary School // February 25, 2016. Governor Mike Pence visits with fourth grade students and teachers at Centerville-Abington Elementary School in Wayne County. 7) Celebrating Read Across America Week // February 26, 2016. Governor Mike Pence joins Indianapolis Colts mascot Blue to read to students at Newby Memorial Elementary School in honor of Read Across America Week.image009 3) Celebrating Indiana FFA // February 23, 2016. Governor Mike Pence joins FFA members from Hamilton Southeastern High School and Eastern Hancock High School at the Indiana State Poultry Association’s annual banquet in the midst of National FFA Week. image003 1) Welcoming Rick Hite to the Administration // February 22, 2016. Governor Mike Pence welcomes former Chief of the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department Rick Hite to the Governor’s Office prior to naming him executive director of the Indiana Civil Rights Commission.image001 2) Commending Poultry Producers and State, Local Officials for Successful Avian Influenza Response // February 23, 2016. Governor Mike Pence joins State Department of Agriculture Director Ted McKinney and Purdue University Dean of Agriculture Dr. Jay Akridge at the Indiana State Poultry Association’s annual banquet to commend poultry producers and state and local leaders for their spirit of cooperation in response to avian influenza in Dubois County.  image002center_img 4) Indiana Biosciences Research Institute Announces $100 Million in Grants // February 24, 2016. Governor Mike Pence joins the Indiana Biosciences Research Institute (IBRI), an independent, nonprofit applied biosciences research institute, to announce two new grants totaling $100 million from Lilly Endowment Inc. and the Eli Lilly and Company Foundation. The grants will support IBRI’s charitable, educational and scientific activities addressing metabolic disease and poor nutrition.image004 FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare image005 image0066) Wayne County Business Roundtable // February 25, 2016. Governor Mike Pence holds a roundtable discussion with business leaders in Wayne County.image007last_img read more

Read More

Yuletide Season

first_imgTo the Editor:Immediately after Christmas Day, I am faced with the most desolate vision, the depressing view of discarded Christmas trees thrown to the curb awaiting their final fate and the hands of sanitation workers. This is woefully wrong! The Christmas season officially ends on Jan. 6, Epiphany, or Three Kings Day. On that day, three kings, or magi, from the Orient visited the infant Jesus. Consequently, the Christmas decorations, to include the Christmas tree, should be taken down on Jan. 7, the day following Epiphany.Very respectfully yours,Albert J. Cupolast_img read more

Read More

Cookie Man wins waste award

first_imgEsher-based bakery, The Cookie Man, has been crowned winner of the Surrey Business Waste Minimisation Award. The privately-owned business introduced two waste minimisation schemes last year and now recycles all food and cardboard waste. As well as preventing around 750 tonnes of waste going to landfill, it will also save the bakery £60k a year.The company also aims to ensure its products don’t use excess packaging and employs an environmental task group committed to improving these figures.The Cookie Man supplies a number of major supermarket chains, including Waitrose, Sainsbury’s and Somerfield.last_img read more

Read More

Moving with the times

first_imgGiven the continually yelp-inducing world we wake up to each morning of apocalyptic economic forecasts, swingeing job cuts and institutional greed, it comes as little surprise that many of us are greeting the environmental call to arms with mutters of ’sod the environment’. An Allegra Strategies survey earlier this year suggested that business directors in the food industry were doing just that, jettisoning their glossy corporate social responsibility (CSR) brochures to keep their ships afloat; CSR dropped from third to 13th in their list of business priorities.But becoming more carbon-efficient can ease those pangs of guilt induced by focusing on your drooping bottom line rather than combating rising sea levels. Access to The Carbon Trust’s interest-free loans has become easier of late, with sums of up to £200,000 now available, and the required carbon thresholds and admin burden reduced. Keeping your head above water by using more carbon-efficient machinery means you could both save money and rescue East Anglia from becoming a marine theme park in 2050.Working with relicsAs a baker, the oven is the very fabric of your business. And you couldn’t get a more literal interpretation of that than The Cavan Bakery, now in its 80th year. The business comprises four shops and local wholesale and bakes breads, cakes, pastries and morning goods. It has just won a prestigious two stars for its bread from the Guild of Fine Foods. Cavan was baking bread and morning goods on two antiquated gas ovens built into its walls, which required two electric water boilers for steam, and which frequently conked out. One of the relics was claimed to be the first three-deck oven in the country when it was installed… in 1944. The other oven was second-hand when it was fitted in 1961.Patch-up jobs on the prehistoric kit were becoming ludicrously costly. When your annual maintenance fee is approaching that of a full-time salary, as it did with Cavan (a staggering £20,000), then it’s time to act. An upgrade was beyond reason. They had to be replaced.Having taken over the family business nine years ago, owners Sarah Greenall (daughter of Tony Cavan) and husband Jeff knew massive investment was needed. “It was very apparent that we had old, inefficient ovens,” says MD Jeff Greenall. “When we took over, fuel costs were manageable. As bills went higher and higher, fuel became a significant cost to the business – almost unmanageable.” As if to avoid any understatement, Sarah adds: “They were absolutely enormous!”As the business squeezed its way through traumatic times – not least the last recession and the opening of the then-biggest Sainsbury’s in the country a mile away, which saw off the greengrocer and butcher on the high street – new machinery was unaffordable. “The first thing we had to do was stabilise the business, make it profitable and secure the future of the staff,” says Jeff. “It was like, ’we know what the goal is’, but before we get there we’ve got to fight a few battles and get the cash to do it. There are probably more ovens like this being used out there than you’d think. Once we’d made the decision, it wasn’t just a case of pulling the ovens out. It’s a huge expense to make it good underneath, out the back and relay the floor.”Dismantling to build upBusiness building often takes a bit of business dismantling, and the bakery in Hampton Hill, Middlesex, did just that over four months of upheaval in 2008. It claimed a £31,000 Carbon Trust unsecured interest-free loan for an oven; longer-term loans were taken for other machinery at “relatively low rates” and extra cash for the refurb was part-funded by the sale of the Greenalls’ house.Disassembling the existing ovens doubled the cost of the new oven. And the expense didn’t stop there; the new oven shone an unflattering light on the other ageing kit. The quicker and more efficient oven outpaced the old bread plant, which then needed to be replaced. If the escalating costs were daunting, the results were worth it. Reduced heat-loss and discarding the electric boilers has lopped 75% off energy consumption.But had they known that economy was going to nose-dive, would they have made those same investments? “Yes,” Jeff answers quickly. “Our gas and electricity costs are still huge, but had we not done anything, they would have been twice or even three times as much.” Another benefit has been improving capacity by releasing space in the bakery, meaning they don’t need to shift production off-site.The next progression will be more shops – its latest opened in Teddington in late 2008 – as well as reintroducing electric vans; ironically, Cavan was the first bakery to use electric vans, similar to milk floats, in the 1950s. “We’re keen to keep all the traditional elements – the huge asset of being a craft, artisan bakery – while embracing new things,” says Sarah. “The world does move on and we need to appeal to that ever-moving market.”—-=== Ways to cut your bakery’s energy consumption ===1. By investing in an energy-efficient steam oven, you could reduce baking times, increase the rate of production and reduce heat loss thanks to better insulation2. Reduce your power consumption by up to 3-5% by replacing the motors on your bulk flour blowing systems with higher-efficiency ones3. Regularly, and at least twice a year, check that your ovens are properly sealed to avoid hot air escaping. By checking and replacing your oven seals, you will avoid increasing the gas-firing rate to compensate for heat loss, providing you with considerable energy savings4. Make sure your oven is regularly checked by a qualified gas engineer to ensure optimum combustion. Poor combustion will result in loss of efficiency, increased gas consumption and increased emissions of atmospheric pollutants5. Motors consume nearly two-thirds of the electricity in Britain’s plant bakeries. By replacing your standard motors with high-efficiency ones you could make a 3-5% energy saving, and by making a 20% reduction in fan speed, you could make a 50% saving in power6. The leak rate on an unmanaged compressed air systems can be as much as 40-50% of the generated output. By regularly checking air compressors and eliminating leaks, you could reduce leakage to 5% – representing a cost saving of 35%7. Switch off plant and machinery that is not in use and provide automatic controls where appropriate (for example, ventilation systems)8. Consider replacing any luminaries that are over 10 years old, and try to use energy-efficient light sources in all areas. Compact fluorescent bulbs use 20-25% of the energy of a tungsten bulb and can last up to 18 times longer. Regularly cleaning luminaries is also essential to maintain lighting efficiency—-=== Fact file ===The business: The Cavan Bakery, Hampton, Middlesex; established 1929; there has been a bakery behind the shop since 1870Turnover: £900,000Oven: A Bongard gas deck oven, supplied by Mono Equipment. (It also uses a separate new energy-saving Sveba Dahlen four-deck oven at its second bakery)Stumbling blocks: being restricted to gas – increasing the power to the electricity sub-station would have cost £14,000+Savings: Cavan was on good gas and electric contracts when it made the changes; gas has since increased from 1.8p per unit to 3.6p and electricity from 4.2p to 12p per unit. “As yet we haven’t made any financial savings in real terms,” says MD Jeff Greenall. “Hopefully we will start to see changes when these contracts run out. However, without making the change we would be in real trouble, with old ovens and the current high utility prices”Size of the Carbon Trust unsecured loan: £31,000 (36-month payback)Annual energy savings: 12,000 units of gas and 6,000 units of electricityAnnual CO2 saving: 81.2 tonneslast_img read more

Read More

Harvey Goldman

first_imgHarvey Goldman, M.D. was born on May 25, 1932 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the city in which he spent his formative years. He received an A.B. degree in mathematics in 1953 and his M.D. in 1957, both from Temple University, where he was elected to membership in the Alpha Omega Alpha honor society. After a rotating internship at Philadelphia General Hospital, he did his residency in pathology at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston. In 1964, following a two-year assignment as a pathologist at the U. S. Naval Hospital in Great Lakes, Michigan, he returned to Boston, Beth Israel Hospital and Harvard Medical School (HMS). Over the next 45 years, he developed a stellar academic career. Beginning as an Instructor, he rose through the ranks to become in 1976 Professor of Pathology at HMS and also in the Harvard-Massachusetts Institute of Technology Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST), a separate academic track to train physician scientists. In 1989, Harvey left Beth Israel Hospital to become Chairman of Pathology at both the New England Deaconess and the New England Baptist Hospitals, positions he held until 1996 when the Beth Israel and Deaconess Hospitals merged to become the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC). At BIDMC, he served as Senior Pathologist and Vice Chairman of the Department of Pathology until his death. For many years he was also a consultant in gastrointestinal pathology at several other Harvard institutions, including Children’s Hospital, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Dr. Goldman died on April 6, 2009 from complications of a hematologic disorder. He is survived by his wife, Dr. Eleonora (Nora) Galvanek, herself a distinguished Harvard pathologist; daughter Vierka; son Sasha; son Dr. Palko Goldman and his wife, Dr. Lida Nabati; and grandson Jasper.Harvey Goldman was a “quadruple threat”: teacher and mentor, clinician, clinical researcher, and administrator, listed in the order of his preference, although he excelled in all facets of academia. He was first an outstanding teacher at HMS, at Beth Israel Hospital/BIDMC and at the national and international levels. At HMS, he not only taught for many years in the basic pathology course and the gastrointestinal pathophysiology block but also in the cardiovascular, renal, and respiratory pathophysiology courses. For 14 years he was the Pathology Coordinator for an elective Systemic Pathology Course for third- and fourth-year medical students He served as Chairman of the HST Human Pathology Course from 1971-1988, and supervised the elective Pathology Clerkship at Beth Israel Hospital for 18 years. As an administrator, he completed terms as Chairman of the Preclinical Promotion Board, the Curriculum Committee, the Pathology Education Committee, and the Faculty Teaching Activity Committee. An important mandate of the latter group was to quantify and elevate the role of teaching as a criterion for academic promotion, a role previously under-recognized at HMS. Success in these endeavors resulted in his being chosen to serve a five-year term as Faculty Dean for Medical Education (1988-1993). In this capacity, he played an important part in implementing the conversion of the preclinical curriculum from a lecture-based to a small group, tutorial-based, interactive format; i.e., the HMS New Pathway. He received multiple teaching awards from the medical students between 1970 and 2006, culminating in his being awarded the Special Faculty Prize for Sustained Excellence in Teaching in 2007. Harvey’s interests in teaching also extended to the postgraduate level, and he was a dedicated and beloved teacher of scores of pathology residents and fellows. At BIDMC, Harvey was the first recipient of the newly created Resident Teaching Award in Anatomic Pathology in 2001; in addition, he was also selected that year for the S. Robert Stone Honorary Teaching Award, a yearly prize given to an outstanding clinician-educator at the medical center.Dr. Goldman was also a giant in teaching at the national and international levels. He was a founding member of the Gastrointestinal Pathology Society (now the Roger Haggitt Gastrointestinal Pathology Society) and served as its president (1982-1983). He was also active in the New England Society of Pathologists (President, 1992-1993), the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation, and the International Academy of Pathology (North America vice-president). However, he is best remembered for his contributions to the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology (USCAP), the society for which he was a tireless advocate. He served on nearly all of its committees, was Chairman of the Education Committee, a member of the governing council, led courses (his gastrointestinal mucosal biopsy course ran for over 10 years by popular demand), and was its President (1999-2000). At the time of his death, he was enthusiastically engaged in planning, with two other BIDMC faculty, a new Short Course on gastrointestinal pathology. His many contributions to USCAP were recognized by his receipt of both the F.K. Mostofi Distinguished Service Award (1995) and the Distinguished Pathologist Award (2006). His abilities as an educator were also recognized by his many invitations to serve as a visiting professor, lecturer, or course director at numerous institutions and professional society meetings throughout the United States, Canada, and Europe as well as forays to Israel, Argentina, and the Far East.Dr. Goldman was not only a master educator but also an outstanding surgical pathologist and investigator in the field of gastrointestinal pathology. Interpretation of gastrointestinal mucosal biopsies is now so well established that it is difficult to recall that in the 1960’s, the use of flexible endoscopy, with the ability to sample esophageal, gastric, small-intestinal, and colonic mucosa, was in its infancy. Harvey was one of the pioneers in advancing study of mucosal specimens and correlating the findings with clinical and imaging data to obtain accurate diagnoses. His studies, often in collaboration with other pathologists and clinicians, resulted in major contributions in many areas including reflux esophagitis, allergic gastrointestinal disorders, inflammatory bowel disease and Barrett’s esophagus. Of particular note was his contribution to establishing criteria for the diagnosis of dysplasia in both inflammatory bowel disease and Barrett’s esophagus. In addition to publishing numerous original articles on these subjects, Harvey co-edited two editions of a major textbook on GI pathology and published a monograph on GI mucosal biopsies. His two-part paper on the usefulness of GI mucosal biopsies, published in 1982 in “Human Pathology,” remains a landmark review that is still widely referenced.There was a personal side to Harvey that was equally, or even more, important to him than his public achievements. No matter how busy he was, Harvey was devoted to his family and always found time to share their lives. As his son Palko said, “He really made a point to get out of work at 5:30 and participate in our Little League games and our homework. But at the same time, he would have to get back to work, and I have this image of him working at the dining room table until the early hours of the morning. Lots of people sacrifice their careers for their family or the opposite. I really think my father excelled at both and sacrificed neither.” Everyone who worked with him knew he wanted you to succeed; he could be a firm but constructive critic in the preparation of lectures, abstracts, and manuscripts, always with the goal of improving the material at hand. Even during the several months of his final illness, he continued to teach residents and fellows on a daily basis, and kept in constant, supportive contact with colleagues who were ill or hospitalized. As his daughter Vierka said, “He really experienced joy in other people’s successes. A lot of people pretend to, but they’re secretly jealous, and he really wasn’t like that, which is a very rare quality.” About 35 years ago, Harvey and his wife Eleonora discovered a tiny resort on the Adriatic coast of Italy. They formed a warm and lasting bond with the Italian family who owned the “pensione” at which they stayed. Among all the foreign destinations he knew, this became the resort of choice for relaxation, and he and his wife returned for a two-week holiday every year, becoming the adopted US component of an extended Italian family.In 1991, Harvey had a heart attack and immediately quit smoking. At his family’s suggestion, he used his former cigarette money to buy two season tickets for Red Sox games. For the rest of his life, he combined his love of baseball with his love of reading. He brought a book to every Red Sox game, and would read between innings and even during protracted innings, a fact observed by his fellow season ticket holders. His son Palko recalls that, “One night when a non-season ticket holder a few seats down remarked, ‘Look at the guy reading a book. How can you read a book at a baseball game?’ Someone responded, ‘He watches a thousand innings a year.’” Ironically, Harvey died on the date that was scheduled to be opening day of the 2009 Red Sox season.On November 17, 2009, a symposium was held in the rotunda of the Joseph B. Martin Conference Center to celebrate Dr. Goldman’s life and achievements. Dean Jeffrey Flier reviewed Harvey’s many accomplishments in teaching, noting that “his clear, elegant, well-organized communication style, his personal warmth and his consensus-building skills translated into several educational leadership positions at HMS.” He read from the nomination for the Special Faculty Prize for Sustained Excellence in Teaching that Harvey received two years ago: “He knows GI pathology like the back of his hand and he is a motivator of medical students. Regarding his ability to teach: being in his Castle Society GI path group, he was like the Pied Piper attracting all the students from all sections. He is also interested in the personal lives and well-being of medical students, as evidenced by his frequent lunches with many students in the class. He even sent food to a student who was studying late at the Medical Education Center!” Dean Flier further noted that at the time Harvey was appointed Faculty Dean of Medical Education, an HMS publication quoted Harvey as saying: “I derive great joy from teaching pathology.” Dean Flier stated that “it brings me great joy to know that Harvey felt uplifted by his work at HMS, as we were so fortunate to be uplifted by him.”Robert Najarian, M.D., gastrointestinal pathology fellow at BIDMC, remembered Dr. Goldman as the “ultimate educator,” noting that “humor was his hammer.” When one resident was correct on two of three diagnoses and thought that that was pretty good, Harvey responded that “2 out of 3 was excellent in baseball but awful in pathology.”Henry Appelman, M.D., Professor of Pathology at the University of Michigan and Harvey’s colleague for more than 30 years, remembered Dr Goldman as “a pioneer in gastrointestinal pathology, a superior intellect, a creative mind.” Dr. Appelman noted that Harvey, he, and a few other contemporaries were founders of the field of gastrointestinal pathology and we “had no one to teach us so we taught ourselves.” Harvey was “at or near the top of the list of the most important people in gastrointestinal pathology over the past 40 years.”Fred Silva, Executive Vice President, USCAP, spoke warmly of his associations with Harvey over the course of more than 25 years at USCAP. Referring to the enormous influence that Harvey had in educating generations of medical students and pathologists, he concluded by applying to Harvey the inscription on the gravestone of Sir Christopher Wren: “LECTOR, SI MONUMENTUM REQUIRIS, CIRCUMSPICE,” which translates as “reader, if you seek his memorial – look around you.”In recognition of Dr. Goldman’s monumental contributions to the teaching of pathology, the Department of Pathology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and the USCAP have jointly endowed an award named for Dr. Goldman to be given to a master educator in pathology. This award will be bestowed each year at the annual meeting of the USCAP. Finally, as a lasting memorial to Harvey’s presence in pathology at BIDMC, the main departmental conference room in which he spent thousands of hours teaching residents and fellows has been named the Harvey Goldman, MD Conference Room and bears his portrait and a commemorative plaque.Professor Harvey Goldman was a giant in the field of pathology, and he is sorely missed as a friend and colleague.Respectfully submitted,Harold F. Dvorak, M.D.Stuart J. Schnitt, M.D.Donald A. Antonioli, M.D.last_img read more

Read More

Running the show

first_imgAfter more than two decades under the leadership of Allan “Bud” Selig, the owners of the 30 Major League Baseball teams last week elected Robert Manfred as the 10th commissioner in the history of the game. Currently the league’s chief operating officer, Manfred, J.D. ’83, bested television executive and Red Sox chairman Tom Werner, ’71, for the top job. Manfred will assume the post in January following Selig’s retirement.He made his name in the league in the late 1980s, working on labor relations, including collective bargaining and revenue sharing. He served as outside counsel for MLB during the disastrous 1994-1995 players’ strike, joined the league’s management in 1998, and rose through the ranks as a trusted Selig lieutenant. Manfred was lead negotiator during the 2002, 2006, and 2011 contract talks, and in 2002 he was instrumental in getting the players’ union to sign off on the game’s first mandatory drug testing agreement, now considered the toughest policy among the four major professional sports.Manfred, 55, who graduated Harvard Law School magna cum laude and served as articles editor of the Harvard Law Review, has maintained close ties to HLS, supporting a scholarship fund and clinical placements for students in the sports law program and frequently speaking before the law school and during sports law symposia. In one of the first interviews since his election, Manfred spoke with the Gazette by phone about the challenges facing baseball and his vision for the future of the game. GAZETTE: When you were at HLS, did you ever envision that you would become the 10th commissioner of Major League Baseball?MANFRED: I was a summer associate at Morgan Lewis in Philadelphia during the summer of 1981 after my first year. And there was a long baseball strike that summer, and I could remember laughing with the guys in the law firm that “I like my labor relations and my sports separate.” I’ve always been a huge baseball fan, but I really did not think that I was going to have a career in sports.GAZETTE: Which team did you grow up rooting for?MANFRED: I grew up a Yankees fan.GAZETTE: So should Red Sox fans be worried: Not only did their guy [Werner] lose, but there will be a Yankee fan in charge?MANFRED: [Laughs] I’ve moved into a state of “permanent neutrality” is the way I’d put that.GAZETTE: Prior to your selection, much of the media speculation concerned whether the owners would remain loyal to Commissioner Selig and vote you in as his hand-picked successor, or get behind Chicago White Sox owner Jerry Reinsdorf, long vocal about his desire for baseball to institute a salary cap and about his dissatisfaction with the league’s revenue-sharing arrangement. Reinsdorf reportedly had assembled a small faction of owners backing Werner, his preferred candidate. What do you say to the claim that you’re not tough enough with the MLBPA [Major League Baseball Players Association], and what ideas did you put forward during your presentation to the owners about how you would lead the game?MANFRED: I don’t want to get into a lot of the campaign back-and-forth. That part of the process is over, and I’m really focused on working with all 30 clubs. What I will say to you about labor is: I think for the vast majority of clubs, my experience in the labor-relations area, the agreements that I’ve negotiated for baseball during the time that I’ve been there, were a positive in terms of my selection.The only thing I would say to you, because it’s really a carry-over idea and it’s relevant to what I’m doing today, is Commissioner Selig has had a number of us working on a project to try to increase youth participation in baseball as a long-term mechanism for growing the game. I’m actually on my way to Williamsport [Penn.] now to go to the Little League World Series. I think my ability to talk about our findings with respect to youth participation and some of the ideas that we’ve developed along with Commissioner Selig for encouraging youth participation was a big positive in the process.GAZETTE: You’ve been at the forefront of baseball’s labor and drug-testing program, but some of the biggest obstacles facing the league today are marketing-related: sagging television ratings, stagnant ballpark attendance, and a “graying” fan base. What should be done to reverse these trends?MANFRED: I have a more optimistic view of the state of the game. I think it’s important to remember that 150 million people go to watch professional baseball games worldwide each year. It is the most-watched professional sport, and when you talk about just that absolute number of people who go watch professional games, I think it is testimony to the fundamental quality of the product. Does that mean that we don’t need to work really hard to remain competitive in an increasingly competitive entertainment market? No, but there are fundamentals about this game that are absolutely phenomenal. Another one is our digital business, MLB.com, is a tremendous asset for this industry as it moves forward. Not only is it widely recognized to be the best digital operation in professional sports, but it’s a great vehicle for making sure that we capture younger audiences as we move forward. I really do think that the game presents a great opportunity for growth. It’s really well positioned to grow going forward.GAZETTE: So those fears are overblown? I think people compare it to the NFL and say it’s not doing as well and that the trends are going in the wrong direction in terms of revenue and popularity.MANFRED: The last time I looked, 73 million people a year didn’t pay to go see NFL games in the United States. It’s how you interpret numbers. There are challenges. Like most TV audiences, our audience is getting older, and I think that we have some great ideas about things that can be done with the game to help on that front. I’m not Pollyannaish about the fact that there are challenges out there. I just think the picture you paint is a little bleak.GAZETTE: Baseball gets criticized for being a slow game, one that not only doesn’t match the speed of football, basketball, and hockey, but also the speed of modern life. In light of the ratings decline, are there any plans to improve the pace of play?MANFRED: Commissioner Selig has been focused on the issue of pace of game for a number of years. I think that moving forward, we’ll continue to look at the pace of the game, how we can make it quicker, things that can be done to make sure that there’s sufficient action in the game, and the absolute length of the game is obviously a third piece of it. And then, I also think that what we do both in the ballpark and in our broadcasts surrounding the core play of the game is very important in terms of keeping the product as appealing as possible. So, yes, I do think pace is an issue that we will continue to focus on.GAZETTE: The current MLBPA collective-bargaining agreement expires at the end of the 2016 season. What issues do you expect will dominate those negotiations? How soon do you start preparing for those talks?MANFRED: We’re doing staff work already. I think that by spring we’ll have appointed a labor-policy committee of owners, and the pace of that preparation will pick up. Right now, I think the issues surrounding amateur talent acquisition will be important, whether we go all the way to an international draft, whether it’s a single worldwide draft or a domestic and an international draft. I think those issues will be important, and I think they’ll be important because probably the most dominant trend in the game right now is that people are winning with younger players, and when people win that way they’re going to be interested in talent acquisition.GAZETTE: So where is the best young talent coming from?MANFRED: The hottest trend in players right now is Cuba. And that really has to do more with the political situation than anything else. More and more players are leaving Cuba, and it is a source not only of talent, but of fairly polished professionals. That’s a new frontier for us right now.GAZETTE: You served as outside counsel to the league when players went on strike in 1994-1995. Since then, MLB has been the only major sport to avoid a labor disruption. What did you learn from that experience?MANFRED: Well, look, a 232-day strike does teach you in very graphic terms about the cost of the application of economic leverage. Great damage was done to the game, both to players and clubs during that strike, and it’s a lesson you don’t forget easily.GAZETTE: You’ve been very active in helping HLS students gain clinical experience in sports law. How did that come about, and what kinds of things do they learn about the practice?MANFRED: I think that the young people whom we’ve had … benefit from the fact that, particularly our labor group, is as strong a group of legal professionals as you’ll find anywhere. Fortunately or unfortunately, we have a tremendous number of difficult, cutting-edge legal issues, and I think that provides law students with a great opportunity to see an alternative to big-firm practice, to see a place that you can go, have challenging issues, and address them in an environment that’s really exciting.GAZETTE: What’s the best piece of advice you’ve gotten from Commissioner Selig?MANFRED: Commissioner Selig has reminded me early and often that governance of baseball is about the clubs, and that you always need to make sure that you’ve got great communication going with the clubs so you understand where your constituents are. And believe me, I will follow that advice as I move forward.last_img read more

Read More

A flight from homophobia

first_img Related But he knows he can’t change the past; he knows other young people are similarly “trapped in that homophobic environment”; and he knows that if he can prevent what happened to him from happening to anyone else, he has to try. One way forward, he said, is to return to the job he loves in the country he calls home.“Just to be in the classroom teaching English with the knowledge of who I am, that itself is sufficient enough to actually send a message that the right way forward has been taken,” he said. “And I just feel, in principle, I need to fight for the right as a Zimbabwean citizen to get to work and contribute to the country in which I was born. I believe I am a good and principled educator, and my intention has always been to go back and argue for the right to use these abilities once again.” U.N. independent expert’s report examines root causes and highlights danger spots and progress How to navigate the gender landscape at work A global look at LGBT violence and bias A Radcliffe fellow, Hovelmeier is also supported by the Scholars at Risk Program, which is part of an international network of institutions and individuals devoted to protecting scholars and promoting academic freedom.“That immediately gave me some sort of purpose, something to look forward to — the thought of being able to gather my thoughts and spend some time in what I knew would be a tonic to what had gone on,” said Hovelmeier.Hovelmeier has spent the first months of his fellowship scouring Harvard’s libraries, part of a personal and professional quest to better understand homophobia in Africa. He hopes his research will inform both a script he is crafting for a play commissioned by the Fugard Theatre in Cape Town, South Africa, and a new curriculum promoting tolerance that can be implemented in Zimbabwe’s schools.“This work is both for my own knowledge and understanding of why Africa hasn’t been able to progress past this issue,” he said. “But it’s also helping me formulate a framework using the solid background of Harvard’s resources to argue for a change in approach, particularly in Zimbabwe.“I am not going to go into schools and say ‘Every student should accept homosexuality,’” he said. “What is more important is to say that ‘regardless of people’s differences and views and opinions we should be engendering a culture that is at least tolerant of other people’s ways of life.’ And I think that starts with school authorities, making sure that their curriculums and ideologies are always conscious of the passive intolerance that features into much of society.”The potential benefits, he argues, are wide-ranging. “We need to remember there is a more universal social agenda beyond Zimbabwe’s borders, and that if we are really going to produce citizens who are global, who can fit in with the world’s changing perspectives, especially if we want those students to come back to the country in future and add to its progression and its prosperity, we need to change,” he said.Despite his experience and his desire to help change the narrative around homosexuality in his homeland, Hovelmeier doesn’t see himself as a gay activist, and he has no desire to assume such a role. In fact, if he could, he said he would simply turn back time. “I wish this whole thing had never happened and that I could be back just doing what I used to do very well in my own country, believing in a purpose that I felt was genuine.” Educator and novelist Neal Hovelmeier’s life changed forever in 2018. The longtime deputy head of school at St. John’s College, a boys’ academy in Borrowdale, a suburb of Zimbabwe’s capital, Harare, was at his desk on a September afternoon when the email arrived. It was a short, direct note from a journalist at a local paper who was writing an article about him that would run the following day. “Do you wish to comment?” the reporter asked.“I was about to be outed in a country that hates homosexuals,” said Hovelmeier, the Robert G. James Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and a Harvard Scholar at Risk. “I knew immediately that this was that awful moment of reckoning and that what had been an intensely personal life for me was going to be made into a public debacle.”Being gay isn’t illegal in Zimbabwe, but according to the country’s Criminal Law Act, consensual physical conduct between men is punishable with a fine, or up to one year in prison, or both. In addition, the nation’s new constitution, approved by parliament in 2013 and signed into law by longtime authoritarian leader Robert Mugabe, bans gay marriage. Mugabe, who was deposed in 2017, once described gay people as being “worse than pigs and dogs.” Discussing the current political climate, Hovelmeier said he is cautiously optimistic that Zimbabwe’s new president, Emmerson Mnangagwa, who has been “far more circumspect on issues of LBGTQ rights” and who hasn’t politicized homophobia like his predecessor, may be signaling a new direction. Still, the English literature teacher knows his future in the country he loves is far from certain.It happened fast. After meeting that September day with the head of school and faculty members, and consulting with a lawyer, Hovelmeier was advised to tell the student body he was gay at a general assembly the next morning. School officials planned to simultaneously notify parents by email. At first, the reaction was overwhelmingly positive, Hovelmeier recalled. Many students stood and cheered as he spoke; others approached him afterward with words of support. For a moment he thought he’d worried for nothing and that his bold move had struck a blow against intolerance. He even hoped he might have inspired others to feel safe and included in their school environment.He was wrong.Soon “a small but vocal group of parents,” he said, began demanding his dismissal. Hate messages and death threats poured in after his phone number and address were leaked to the press. Facing increasing pressure to step down, and fearing for his safety, Hovelmeier reluctantly resigned. But the pain and the anguish lingered.“I lost 40 pounds. I couldn’t sleep. I couldn’t eat. My teeth hurt from grinding them. I was suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and severe depression,” he said. “I was trying to gather the strength to convey this sense of normality, but privately I was completely shattered.”The love and support of family and friends, and a longtime Harvard initiative offered him support and hope. At the urging of a fellow writer Hovelmeier applied to the University’s Scholars at Risk Program. “And to my absolute surprise and wonder,” he recalled “I received an email saying that I was being offered a fellowship here at Radcliffe.” “I need to fight for the right as a Zimbabwean citizen to get to work and contribute to the country in which I was born. I believe I am a good and principled educator, and my intention has always been to go back and argue for the right to use these abilities once again.” LGBTQ language and institutional responsibility are where it begins The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

Read More

Judicial campaign conduct forums set

first_img May 1, 2004 Regular News Judicial campaign conduct forums set Judicial campaign conduct forums setcenter_img The Florida Supreme Court and The Florida Bar Board of Governors, in conjunction with the Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee and the state’s trial court chief judges, are again sponsoring a series of judicial campaign conduct forums in advance of this year’s elections.The forums will be conducted May 24-28 in all judicial circuits in which there will be contested judicial elections. Each forum will last approximately an hour and will cover requirements imposed upon candidates for judicial office by Canon 7 of Florida’s Code of Judicial Conduct and the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar. The forums will emphasize the importance of integrity and professionalism among candidates for judicial office and the consequent impact of campaign conduct on public trust and confidence in the judicial system. The presentations will further impress upon candidates and others in the community the seriousness with which the Supreme Court and the Bar view any abuse of the election process, according to a press release from the court.At each forum, the circuit’s chief judge will open with brief remarks stressing the nonpartisan character of judicial races, then present a videotaped introduction by Chief Justice Harry Lee Anstead. Representatives of The Florida Bar Board of Governors will speak briefly regarding the Bar’s role in ensuring compliance with the code. Members of the Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee will then provide a summary review of Canon 7, give participants a list of informational resources, and discuss the disciplinary process.The Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee is charged with rendering advisory opinions interpreting the application of the Code of Judicial Conduct to specific circumstances confronting or affecting judges and judicial candidates. The committee’s booklet, “An Aid to Understanding Canon 7,” will be distributed at all forums, first to candidates and campaign managers, then to others as available. Copies of the booklet will be available for downloading from the “Press Page” of the Supreme Court’s Web site at www.flcourts.org/pubinfo/documents/temp_canon7.pdf.All candidates for judicial office and their campaign managers are encouraged to attend. The forums are also open to local bar association presidents, local political party chairs, representatives of the print and broadcast media, as well as members of the general public.The following is a listing of judicial campaign conduct forums preliminarily scheduled throughout the state. Forums will be canceled in any circuit in which there are no contested judicial elections following the close of qualifying on May 7. • First Circuit, Monday, May 24, 1 p.m. (CDT) M.C. Blanchard Building, Courtroom 407, 190 Governmental Center, Pensacola 32501 • Second Circuit, Wednesday, May 26, 1 p.m., Leon County Courthouse, Courtroom 3C, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee 32301. • Third Circuit, Friday, May 28, 1 p.m., Dixie County Courthouse, 214 NE 351 Highway, Cross City 32628. • Fourth Circuit, Wednesday, May 26, 1 p.m., Duval County Courthouse, Conference Room 220, 330 East Bay Street, Jacksonville 32202. • Fifth Circuit, Monday, May 24, 1 p.m., Marion County Judicial Center, 5th Floor Conference Room, 110 N.W. 1st Avenue, Ocala 34475. • Sixth Circuit, Monday, May 24, 1 p.m., Pinellas County Criminal Justice Center, Courtroom #1—Fourth Floor, 14250 49th Street N., Clearwater 33762. • Seventh Circuit, Thursday, May 27, 1 p.m., Volusia County Courthouse Annex — City Island, Courtroom #5, 125 E. Orange Avenue, Daytona Beach 32114. • Eighth Circuit, Tuesday, May 25, 1 p.m., Alachua County Courthouse, Courtroom 4A, 201 E. University Avenue, Gainesville 32601. • Ninth Circuit, Tuesday, May 25, 1 p.m., Orange County Courthouse, Conference Room—23rd Floor, 425 N. Orange Avenue, Orlando 32801. • 10th Circuit, Friday, May 28, 1 p.m., Polk County Courthouse, 9th Floor Conference Room, 255 North Broadway, Bartow 33831. • 11th Circuit, Monday, May 24, 1 p.m., Dade County Courthouse, Courtroom 4-2, 73 West Flagler Street, Miami. 33130 •12th Circuit, Wednesday, May 26, 1 p.m., Sarasota County Judicial Center, Room 810, 2002 Ringling Boulevard, Sarasota 34237. •13th Circuit, Tuesday, May 25, 1 p.m., Hillsborough County Courthouse, Judicial Conference Room 214-G, 419 Pierce Street, Tampa 33602. •14th Circuit, Thursday, May 27, 1 p.m., (CDT), Washington County Courthouse, Main Court Room, 1293 Jackson Avenue, Chipley 34248. • 15th Circuit, Friday, May 28, 1 p.m., Palm Beach County Courthouse, Judicial Dining Room, Room 1.2402, 205 North Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach 33401. • 16th Circuit, Thursday, May 27, 1 p.m., Monroe County Courthouse, Grand Jury Room, 4th Floor, 500 Whitehead Street, Key West 33040. •17th Circuit, Friday, May 28, 1 p.m., Broward County Courthouse, Courtroom #400, 201 S.E. Sixth Street, Ft. Lauderdale 33301. • 18th Circuit, Monday, May 24, 1 p.m., Brevard County Government Center, Building C, Supervisor of Elections Room, 2725 Judge Fran Jamieson Way, Viera 32940. • 19th Circuit, Wednesday, May 26, 1 p.m., St. Lucie County Courthouse, Room 217, 218 South 2nd Street, Ft. Pierce 34950. • 20th Circuit, Thursday, May 27, 1 p.m., Lee County Justice Center, Grand Jury Room, 3rd Floor, 1700 Monroe Street, Ft. Myers 33901. Questions regarding the forums may be directed to Susan Leseman or Cathy Brockmeier, Office of the State Courts Administrator, (850) 922-5079.last_img read more

Read More

New swine flu found in China has pandemic potential

first_imgResearchers in China have discovered a new type of swine flu that is capable of triggering a pandemic, according to a study published Monday in the US science journal PNAS.Named G4, it is genetically descended from the H1N1 strain that caused a pandemic in 2009.It possesses “all the essential hallmarks of being highly adapted to infect humans,” say the authors, scientists at Chinese universities and China’s Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Topics : Tests also showed that any immunity humans gain from exposure to seasonal flu does not provide protection from G4.According to blood tests which showed up antibodies created by exposure to the virus, 10.4 percent of swine workers had already been infected.The tests showed that as many as 4.4 percent of the general population also appeared to have been exposed.The virus has therefore already passed from animals to humans but there is no evidence yet that it can be passed from human to human – the scientists’ main worry.”It is of concern that human infection of G4 virus will further human adaptation and increase the risk of a human pandemic,” the researchers wrote.The authors called for urgent measures to monitor people working with pigs.”The work comes as a salutary reminder that we are constantly at risk of new emergence of zoonotic pathogens and that farmed animals, with which humans have greater contact than with wildlife, may act as the source for important pandemic viruses,” said James Wood, head of the department of veterinary medicine at Cambridge University.A zoonotic infection is caused by a pathogen that has jumped from a non-human animal into a human.center_img From 2011 to 2018, researchers took 30,000 nasal swabs from pigs in slaughterhouses in 10 Chinese provinces and in a veterinary hospital, allowing them to isolate 179 swine flu viruses. The majority were of a new kind which has been dominant among pigs since 2016.The researchers then carried out various experiments including on ferrets, which are widely used in flu studies because they experience similar symptoms to humans – principally fever, coughing and sneezing.  G4 was observed to be highly infectious, replicating in human cells and causing more serious symptoms in ferrets than other viruses.last_img read more

Read More