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Why does using a period in a text message make you…

first_img TAGSthe conversation.com Previous articleThe first resolution for 2018: VolunteerNext articleApopka’s biggest story of 2017: 11 finalists emerge Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Ej January 7, 2018 at 10:20 am By Lauren Collister, Scholarly Communications Librarian at the University of Pittsburgh and first published on theconversation.comWhen it comes to texting, the period, full stop, point – whatever you call it – has been getting a lot of attention.People have begun noticing slight changes to the way our smallest punctuation mark is deployed, from declarations that it’s going out of style to claims that it’s becoming angry.What they’re actually noticing is written language becoming more flexible, with texting possessing its own set of stylistic norms (sometimes informally called “textspeak” or “textese”).The period is merely one example of this shift, a change that has opened up new possibilities for communicating with written language. Just as we have different styles of speaking in different situations, so do we have context-dependent styles of writing.Reading between the periodsThough periods can still signal the end of a sentence in a text message, many users will omit them (especially if the message is only one sentence long). This tendency now subtly influences how we interpret them.Because text messaging is a conversation that involves a lot of back-and-forths, people add fillers as a way to mimic spoken language. We see this with the increased use of ellipses, which can invite the recipient to continue the conversation. The period is the opposite of that – a definitive stop that signals, as linguistics professor Mark Liberman has explained, “This is final, this is the end of the discussion.”For some, this can appear angry or standoffish.Earlier this year, psychologist Danielle Gunraj tested how people perceived one-sentence text messages that used a period at the end of the sentence. Participants thought these text messages were more insincere than those that didn’t have a period. But when the researchers then tested the same messages in handwritten notes, they found that the use of a period didn’t influence how the messages were perceived.In a 2007 study by linguists Naomi Baron and Rich Ling, multi-sentence text messages often had punctuation to indicate where the sentences stopped, but only 29 percent of these texts had punctuation at the very end of the message. The reason, Baron and Ling explain, is that “the act of sending a message coincides with sentence-final punctuation.”Situational switchesBut of all the things to feel when seeing a period at the end of a text message – why insincerity?The answer could have something to do with a term used by linguist John J. Gumperz: “situational code-switching,” which is when we change how we talk depending on where we are, who we’re talking to or how we’re communicating.A common example is the way we talk in a job interview versus at a bar with friends. Typically, a speaker will use much more formal language in an interview than when hanging out with peers. If you talked to your friends the same way you talked during a job interview, it would probably give a stilted, distant feeling to the conversation.Scholars originally investigated situational code-switching in spoken language because the spoken language was used in both casual and formal settings. In the past, written language was almost always tinged with a level of formality because it was associated with permanence in books and written documents.However, now that text messaging and social media have given their users an outlet for casual written language, differences between writing styles can be seen.The use of the period is one example of situational code-switching: When using one in a text message, it’s perceived as overly formal. So when you end your text with a period, it can come across as insincere or awkward, just like using formal spoken language in a casual setting like a bar.Social norms dictated by code-switching could explain why using proper grammar in a text might make you look insincere. ‘Paint Dots’ via www.shutterstock.comA different form of sincerityAnother example of language change in casual written forms is the repetition of letters. Communication scholar Erika Darics has observed that the repetition of letters or punctuation marks adds intensity to messages (“stopppp!!!”). She writes that this creates “a display of informality through using a relaxed writing style.”Linguist Deborah Tannen described a similar phenomenon, noting that repeated exclamation points in a message can convey a sincere tone, like in the following text message:JACKIE I AM SO SO SO SORRY! I thought you were behind us in the cab and then I saw you weren’t!!!!! I feel soooooooo bad! Catch another cab and ill pay for it for youuuuuNote that this message does not contain a message-final period, since that may convey insincerity that would contradict the apology being presented. Instead, the sender uses the non-standard long vowels in “soooooooo” and “youuuuu” as well as five exclamation points at the end of one sentence.Compare this to a standardized version of the text message:Jackie, I am so sorry. I thought you were behind us in the cab and then I saw you weren’t. I feel so bad! Catch another cab and I’ll pay for it for you.This more formal version, according to the arguments made by Tannen and Darics, reads more like a work email sent to a colleague than one to a friend sincerely and fervently apologizing for a transportation mishap.It’s a bit counterintuitive, but using formal language may undermine the sincerity of the apology; in order to convey the “right” message, it’s important to know the proper protocols. This may explain why some people’s text messages seem stilted or awkward: they’re used to writing with a formal style that doesn’t translate to the casual medium.Will texting erode our writing skills?In the media, there’s been a fair amount of debate about whether texting – or using overly casual language – can “ruin” someone’s writing ability. (Examples include the LA Times, the BBC and The Daily Mail, to name a few.)However, past research into situational code-switching in spoken language has shown that a person’s ability to code-switch can signal social competency, can affirm one’s sense of identity or membership in a community and may be an indicator of high intellectual ability in children.Studies like the recent work of psychologists Gene Ouellette and Melissa Michaud have shown that the use of text messaging and “textese” has little relationship to how someone will score on spelling, reading and vocabulary tests. Meanwhile, a study out of California State University found little use of “textisms” in formal letter writing assignments completed by students. This observation supports work like a study by psychologist Beverly Plester and colleagues, who found that an increased use of textese was correlated with higher scores on verbal reasoning ability tests. They suggested that the preteens in their study were able to “slip between one register of language and another, as they deem it appropriate.”This shows that frequent and fluent users of casual written language can often readily code-switch: they know to put that period at the end of every sentence in a formal writing assignment. Some educators are even beginning to incorporate lessons about formal and informal writing into their classrooms, which can help students identify those situations that require the use of different styles.Instead of ignoring or deriding the variation in written language, embracing the change in language – and the ability of speakers and writers to code-switch – can lead to better communication skills in all contexts.Knowing when a period might indicate insincerity is just one of them. 2 COMMENTS January 1, 2018 at 11:07 am Reply Nice UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 center_img Please enter your comment! Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter And that’s THAT…. . Reply EJ Please enter your name here Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

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Floradas House / Obra Arquitetos

first_img “COPY” CopyAbout this officeObra ArquitetosOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesSão José dos CamposBrazilPublished on February 21, 2013Cite: “Floradas House / Obra Arquitetos” [Casa Floradas / Obra Arquitetos] 21 Feb 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogAluminium CompositesTechnowoodWood Siding in KSR Villa BodrumPlasticsMitrexSolar SidingMetal PanelsAurubisOxidized Copper: Nordic BrownEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesCupa PizarrasCupaclad® 101 Random in Les PalmiersUrban ApplicationsIsland Exterior FabricatorsPublic Safety Answering Center II Envelope SystemConcreteKrytonConcrete Hardening – Hard-CemSkylightsVELUX CommercialModular Skylights – Ridgelight 25-40°Porcelain StonewareGrespaniaPorcelain Tiles – Coverlam ImperialWindowspanoramah!®ah! Vertical SlidingFastenersSchöckConcrete Façade Fasteners – Isolink®CarpetsFabromont AGTextile Floor Covering – Arena®CoatingsFormicaLaminate – ColorCore®2More products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream ArchDaily Floradas House / Obra Arquitetos Floradas House / Obra ArquitetosSave this projectSaveFloradas House / Obra Arquitetos ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/335026/floradas-house-obra-arquitetos Clipboard Save this picture!© Rafael P. Schimidt+ 16 Share Copy•São José dos Campos, Brazilcenter_img Architects: Text description provided by the architects. Two spaces with double height, clashing with each other, allow full connection between the 3 levels of the house. Save this picture!© Rafael P. SchimidtThe goal is to promote a situation where its residents relatively know where the others are, so they can seek interaction or individuality. Save this picture!© Rafael P. SchimidtEach place has a single edge which mainly focused illumination. Similar sizes, the variation in time of day and orientation of the opening promotes a type and quantity of light for each specific place.Save this picture!© Rafael P. SchimidtProject gallerySee allShow less’Under the Cloud’ Railway Station Proposal / Arthur KupreychukUnbuilt ProjectCABII House / Nacho Carbó arquitectoSelected Projects Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/335026/floradas-house-obra-arquitetos Clipboard “COPY” Brazil Projects Houseslast_img read more

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Government announces funds for innovative fundraising

first_imgAn extra £9 million will initially be used to fund voluntary and community groups that support charitable giving; provide support for charities through training events; work with corporates to build private sector engagement with the implementation of the Russell Commission; and work with the Giving Forum to consider the potential benefits of a future national celebration of giving, such as a Year of Giving.Secondary schools in England will also be given ‘Charity Accounts’ offering balances of £500 for students to set up and run their very own charitable organisations. Howard Lake | 16 November 2005 | News Tagged with: Recruitment / people The Home Secretary, the Rt Hon Charles Clarke MP, yesterday announced that government funds are to be made available to fundraisers to test original and tax-efficient methods of fundraising.Speaking at the annual ‘Funding the Future’ conference organised by fundraising and strategy consultancy, Action Planning, with ACEVO and Third Sector, the Home Secretary launched an Invest to Give fund for innovation. This will give small and medium-sized charities the capacity to test new fundraising ideas, provided that an agreed proportion of monies raised from successful projects are re-invested in the fund. The innovation fund forms part of a package of measures entitled “A Generous Society” which the government hopes will promote “a culture of giving”. Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  17 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Government announces funds for innovative fundraisinglast_img read more

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Corporate foundations spending & income trends revealed in nfpSynergy report

first_img Corporate foundations receive the greatest proportion of their incoming resources from their founding company, and spend near to or over 100% of this on charitable giving, according to an nfpSynergy report.The report, Strong Foundations: How corporate foundations raise money and do good work, has been compiled using information from two previous reports on corporate foundations published by Corporate Citizenship, a report published by the Association of Charitable Foundations, data from the Charity Commission and the individual webpages of the foundations in question.nfpSynergy researched 20 UK corporate foundations to reveal general trends regarding sources of income, spending on charitable activities, causes supported, and relationship to founder company.It found that more than half of the 20 foundations investigated receive over 50% of their incoming resources in the form of financial gifts from their founding company. This varied greatly between the foundations in the study however: Bupa UK Foundation and the Panasonic Trust receive 100% of their incoming resources through donations from their founder corporations for example, while the Hoover Foundation and the John Lewis Foundation receive none. Nine foundations out of the 20 receive 80% or more of their incoming resources from their corporate founder.Around a quarter receives donations from the public as part of their incoming resources, often through collection tins in stores, or using online schemes. Four of the 20 foundations receive income from sales of merchandise by the founding store, namely John Lewis (98% of incoming resources), Costa Foundation (48%), The Body Shop Foundation (41%) and Greggs Foundation (25%).Four also receive some income from staff fundraising. The WH Smith Group receives the most, as 50%, followed by Ford of Britain Trust (21%), Costa Foundation (4%) and Greggs Foundation (2%).While most foundations seem to support multiple causes, those with staff or in-store fundraising schemes often support causes picked by the staff or public, and common sectors are social welfare and economic hardship, young people, and education.90% of respondents to one of the Corporate Citizenship surveys referred to said that they have at least ‘some senior management involvement’ from the founding company. 84% have at least one trustee from the founding company, and 58% said their giving strategy is linked to their business focus.In general, corporate foundations are spending near to or over 100% of their incoming resources on charitable giving, supporting multiple causes from a wide range of sectors, many of which have no link to the business focus of the founding company.The report, including references to the data used, can be read in full on the nfpSynergy site. Melanie May | 23 January 2017 | News Tagged with: Research / statistics trusts and foundations Corporate foundations spending & income trends revealed in nfpSynergy report AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis26  159 total views,  1 views today Advertisement  160 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis26 About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

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Tenth Zayed Future Energy Prize offers US$1.5 million prize

first_img Tagged with: competition environment Tenth Zayed Future Energy Prize offers US$1.5 million prize  103 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis2 The Zayed Future Energy Prize is offering US$1.5 million to an NGO that is leading development of future energy solutions and contributing significantly to the fields of renewable energy and sustainability.Launched by the United Arab Emirates Government in 2008, the Zayed Future Energy Prize is now in its tenth year, and has already awarded more than US$30 million to 57 recipients. According to the Prize, to date, more than 289 million people are benefitting from the sustainable actions of previous prize winners.The annual award is worth a total of $US4 million, divided in in the following five categories:Large Corporation (A recognition award)Small and Medium Enterprise (SME) (US$1.5 million)Non-Profit Organisation (NGO) (US$1.5 million)Lifetime Achievement (US$500,000)Global Secondary Schools (US$500,000 divided amongst five regions: Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania)The deadline for entries is 6th July, and applications are via the Zayed Future Energy Prize website.In 2016, the prize received a record 1,676 entries from 103 different nations, a 22% increase on the previous record set the year before, with UK-based Practical Action recognised for its work in providing deprived communities with clean energy across the globe.Paul Smith-Lomas, CEO of Practical Action, said:“We would highly recommend other organisations to apply for the Zayed Future Energy Prize in the future. It allows you to benefit from the publicity and associated networking opportunities that come with this award.” Advertisementcenter_img Melanie May | 2 May 2017 | News About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.  104 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis2last_img read more

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Journalist barred from participating as guest on television programme

first_img NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say January 9, 2002 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Journalist barred from participating as guest on television programme Morocco / Western SaharaMiddle East – North Africa Morocco / Western SaharaMiddle East – North Africa On 2 December 2000, Le Journal and Assahifa were banned after publishing a letter credited to former opposition figure Mohamed Basri, which stated that the Moroccan Left was involved in the attempted coup d’état against King Hassan II in 1972, and directly implicated current Prime Minister Abderrahmane Youssoufi. The two newspapers were allowed to publish again under new names (Assahifa Ousbouiya and Le Journal hebdomadaire) in January 2001. Receive email alerts According to information collected by RSF, the news director of the 2M television network’s second channel, based in Casablanca, Ahmed El Bouz, a journalist from the Casablanca-based Arabic-language weekly Assahifa Ousbouiya, from participating as a guest on one of the station’s programmes. Sub-editor El Bouz had earlier been invited by Hamid Saâdeni to speak on the 5 January 2002 episode of the “Lil sahafa raie” (The Press Has an Opinion) programme, which is broadcast live on 2M on Saturdays at around 1:00 p.m. (local time). Yet on 4 January, Saâdeni called El Bouz in order to tell him that “after having checked the list of invited guests for (this Saturday’s programme), news director Sitaïl had crossed out (the journalist’s) name and stated that as long as she was 2M’s news director, neither Assahifa Ousbouiya nor Le Journal hebdomadaire would be invited as guests on any of the station’s programmes.” Contacted by Aboubakr Jamaï, publication director of Assahifa Ousbouiya and Le Journal hebdomadaire, Sitaïl confirmed her statement and added that she “(took) responsibility for these facts.” News to go further RSF joins Middle East and North Africa coalition to combat digital surveillance Follow the news on Morocco / Western Sahara June 8, 2021 Find out morecenter_img Organisation News Help by sharing this information Hunger strike is last resort for some imprisoned Moroccan journalists RSF_en News News In a letter to Minister of Communications Mohammed Achaari, Reporters sans frontières (Reporters Without Borders – RSF) expressed its concern about the ban on Ahmed El Bouz, sub-editor of the Arabic-language weekly Assahifa Ousbouiya, from speaking on a programme of the 2M television station. “We ask that you explain this decision and particularly 2M news director Samira Sitaïl’s remarks,” stated Robert Ménard, the organisation’s secretary-general. April 28, 2021 Find out more April 15, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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King amends constitution to keep ban on newspaper

first_img November 14, 2019 Find out more RSF asks Nauru to let journalists cover Pacific Islands Forum News to go further RSF condemns cancellation of Vanuatu newspaper editor’s work permit Reporters Without Borders (Reporters sans frontières) today criticised King Taufaahau Tupou IV of Tonga for signing constitutional amendments and reintroducing press laws on 5 December that allow his government to maintain a ban on the independent newspaper Taimi o’ Tonga.The king’s actions posed a serious threat to free expression and represented a huge step backwards for press freedom, the organisation said. It was very regrettable that the Tongan authorities had gone so far as to amend the constitution just to keep blocking distribution of Taimi o’ Tonga, which is produced in New Zealand.Reporters Without Borders called on the Tongan prime minister, Prince ‘Ulukalala Lavaka Ata, to convince the king to reverse these decision and allow the newspaper to circulate freely.In view of the seriousness of the situation, the organisation also announced that it will ask the European Union authorities to apply provisions of article 96 of the Cotonou Convention, which envisage sanctions in case of failure to respect “human rights, democratic principles and the rule of law.” Tonga is a signatory to the convention.The constitution used to guarantee free expression. The amendments signed by the king on 5 December served to retroactively validate a February ban on Taimi o’ Tonga, which the Supreme court had ruled unconstitutional in May.The king also approved the reintroduction of two press laws, the Newspaper Act and the Media Operators Act, which give the government extensive powers including to grant publication and import licences.These amendments and press laws eroding the principle of an independent press were approved in October by a parliament with 30 members, of whom 21 are named by the king. The constitution will henceforth allow the authorities to ban a news media if it violates “cultural traditions or the right to private life.”Taimi o’ Tonga editor Kalafi Moala, who lives in New Zealand, said free expression had completely ceased in Tonga. The constitutional amendments will allow the authorities to ban distribution of other foreign publications, as well as Taimi o’ Tonga. RSF_en Help by sharing this information TongaAsia – Pacific Follow the news on Tonga News King amends constitution to keep ban on newspaper December 12, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 News Receive email alerts Tonga gags state broadcaster two weeks before election Organisation August 14, 2018 Find out more News October 31, 2017 Find out more TongaAsia – Pacific last_img read more

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Marks & Spencer ahead of the game

first_imgA mandatory retirement age stops service firms attracting talent, sayspersonnel director of Marks and Spencer Helena Feltham. “We are looking for the best people and an age barrier is a restrictionon that,” Feltham said. M&S has recently scrapped retirement ages. Staff who reach 65 can nownegotiate with their managers whether or not they stay on at work. Feltham said the firm was responding to demands from the business andchanges in social attitudes. “Legislation is on the way and we want to beahead of the game,” she said. Scrapping the retirement age would not harm productivity, Feltham said. Thefirm had robust disciplinary and sickness policies to deal with underperformingor persistently absent staff. Earlier this year the Nationwide Building Society raised its retirement ageto 70. Marks & Spencer ahead of the gameOn 1 Nov 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Be inspired and let your big ideas flow

first_img Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Be inspired and let your big ideas flowOn 18 May 2004 in Personnel Today Ideas. We all want them – from the writer faced with the anguish of theempty page, to the chief executive who knows that if he could only tap into thecreativity of the workforce, there would be a step change in energy, innovationand productivity. But where and how can you promote ideas? The American psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi is famously associatedwith the concept of ‘flow’ – a form of super-focus which the best sportsmen andwomen, musicians and writers adopt when they are at their best. Flow comes tous ordinary mortals when, for example, writing a piece such as this. You mightbe completely stuck and nothing comes to mind for hours. But when flow descends– usually triggered by the adrenaline of an approaching deadline – it can becompleted fast. All the bits of your brain that create the connections thatgenerate ideas suddenly lock into place. You are on a roll, blanking outeverything except what you need to focus on the task. If we could find flowmore systematically, we would perform so much better. In some respects, HR professionals are trying to create organisational flow.If all the elements in the organisation can be persuaded to focus and pull inthe same direction, you create the kind of sustained roll that defines allhigh-performance organisations. It doesn’t matter whether it’s based on Porrasand Collins’ great book Built to Last, or our own findings in the first phaseof a Work Foundation project called ‘Work and Enterprise’. What createsperformance is the integration of multiple objectives around a clear sense oforganisational vocation. The serendipities and connections lock into place;teams function; quality conversations are routine; leadership and engagementjust work. I suppose our next phase of work – amassing survey evidence and case studiesto bear out this approach – could be thought of as trying to identify whatcreates organisational flow. We have fragments of the picture. My colleagueMyles Downey, director of studies at the School of Coaching, is a devotee of flow.His approach to coaching is essentially about blocking out externalinterference to maximise performance – a lesson he transfers from sport tobusiness. But what are the embedded processes that create flow? Are theremethods of generating ideas and getting them adopted in the way common tohigh-performance organisations? Is there more to innovation than giving peoplethe permission to fail? Is it vastly easier to ‘say’, than to ‘do’? One idea is technology brokering, or ‘waterholing’. This is the consciousbringing together of disparate people who can fire off each other infacilitated conversations. But while that might generate great ideas, wherenext? The trick, as always, is implementation, getting ownership and buy-in.Most organisations are just like most people – they don’t achieve their truepotential. If they could just find the flow… By Will Hutton, Chief executive, The Work Foundationlast_img read more

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Dixie State Football Earns First Win of Season

first_img Tags: Conner Miller/Darrius Nash/Dejuan Dantzler/Dixie State Football/Fort Lewis Skyhawks/Simote Lokotui/Xavier Smith Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailDURANGO, Colo.-Kody Wilstead completed 16 of 32 passes for 327 yards, three touchdowns and an interception as the Dixie State Trailblazers bested the Fort Lewis Skyhawks 23-14 Saturday at Dennison Memorial Field in Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference football action.Wilstead judiciously spread the ball around, throwing touchdown passes to Conner Miller (3 rec, 110 yards, TD), Xavier Smith ( 2 rec, 65 yards, TD) and Dejuan Dantzler (3 rec, 59 yards, TD) in the win for Dixie State, which improves them to 1-1 on the season.The Skyhawks built a 14-0 lead at the half as Jake Lowry (17 of 34, 212 yards, 2 TD’s/INT) threw a pair of touchdown passes to Isaac Lepkee (2 rec, 54 yards, TD). Nevertheless, Dixie State took control in the second half by virtue of Wilstead’s steady quarterbacking as he averaged 9 yards per attempt and 19.4 yards per completion on the afternoon.Redshirt sophomore defensive back Darrius Nash added an interception and fellow redshirt sophomore defensive back Simote Lokotui stepped up with a pair of sacks to lead the Trailblazers’ defense.The Trailblazers again hit the road next Saturday as they face the New Mexico Highlands Cowboys at Las Vegas, N.M. in hopes of improving to 2-1 in RMAC play. September 14, 2019 /Sports News – Local Dixie State Football Earns First Win of Season Brad Jameslast_img read more

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