Category: rwtxkbdjdvgv

LADA Improves Capacity of Vegetable Aggregators and Food Processors

first_imgLife Focus Vegetable Aggregators received a 30Kva generator from LADA.The Liberia Agribusiness Development Activity (LADA) over the weekend made a donation of two generators worth US$21,100 to a vegetable aggregator and food processor in Margibi and Montserrado counties.The Papé Natural Food Enterprise of Kakata received a 25kva generator, while the Life Focus Liberia Limited of Mount Barclay received a 30kva unit.The generators form part of several other equipment that LADA is currently procuring under its Co-Investment Fund (CIF), a matching grant fund aimed at building the capacities of agribusinesses in Liberia, according to Victor Ngorbu, CIF manager at the LADA program.Ngorbu told journalists during the delivery of the generators that his institution is building the capacity of agribusinesses in order to improve the incomes of smallholder farmers through market linkages and value addition.“LADA intends to enhance agribusiness productivity in the rice, cassava, vegetables, cocoa and aquaculture value chains. These empowered groups are involved in the aggregation and processing of food. We are collaborating with them to procure some machines that will enhance their aggregation and processing capacities. These generators are part of other equipment that will provide them with capacity to produce more food products for the market,” he said.“With these interventions, we expect that the productivity of these plants will increase to enable smallholder farmers to access better markets to earn more money and reduce poverty,” he said.LADA’s model to support agribusiness is meant to sustain them without much assistance from donor organizations in the future, he emphasized.The LADA CIF manager said several enterprises have benefited and others are in the process of benefiting from the initiative.According to a LADA press release, Life Focus Liberia Limited is benefiting from a grant of US$108,000, while Pape Natural Food received US$127,000 under a 50 percent cost-share arrangement, according to a LADA release. Patom Enterprise, another beneficiary in Montserrado County, received a 30kva generator from LADA on Monday.Receiving the equipment, the managing director of the Papé Natural Food Enterprise lauded CNFA/LADA for the high level of support.Joe Togba said the 25kva generator will put his group in the position to intensify the production of more foodstuff for the market.Papé Natural Foods is a family-owned and operated venture with its roots firmly planted in Margibi County that buys farm produce from smallholder farmers for processing.‘‘We have a small and dedicated staff, most of whom are women; ensuring that everyone receives training in all aspects of food processing is important to us. We are looking for more opportunities to work with more smallholder farmers in the future to improve their income generation through value addition,” he said.For his part, the administrative manager of Life Focus Liberia, Gaye Suomie, told reporters that his institution is involved in sourcing vegetables from smallholder farmers and selling them to supermarkets, restaurants, and hotels in Monrovia.“The LADA project donation is greatly transforming our facility in many ways as we are expecting a cold storage container that will improve our processing and aggregation capacities to reach more smallholder farmers,” he disclosed.The LADA program is a 5-year Feed the Future initiative of the U.S government aimed at increasing the income of smallholder farmers through increased private sector investment in the agribusiness sector of Bong, Lofa and Montserrado counties.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Read More

‘He listened:’ Alberta’s energy minister meets with federal counterpart in Calgary

first_img“It was a great opportunity to explain the very real problems that Alberta is facing,” she said. “He listened, for sure, and I believe he understood.“In the months ahead, we’ll see whether there is action.”The Canadian Press CALGARY — Alberta’s energy minister says she had a productive meeting with Canada’s newly appointed natural resources minister.Sonya Savage met with Seamus O’Regan, an MP from Newfoundland, this week during his first official visit to Alberta.She says he listened and appeared to understand the frustrations in Alberta.- Advertisement -Savage says there are many issues that need to be addressed in the near future.Her priority is dealing with the CN rail strike, which she says is preventing 170,000 barrels of oil from moving out of Alberta every day.Savage says her other concerns include getting the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion built without delay, and changing two controversial federal bills that affect the energy industry.Advertisementlast_img read more

Read More

Man United will sign ‘a couple of players’ Wilkins tells talkSPORT

first_imgFormer Manchester United midfielder Ray Wilkins has backed new boss Louis van Gaal to quickly turn things around at Old Trafford, but insists that the Red Devils will need to delve into the transfer market in order to do so.Van Gaal’s Premier League debut ended in disaster as his side fell 2-1 to Swansea, with the Dutchman admitting afterwards that the players’ confidence was ‘shattered’, but as Wilkins told the Weekend Sports Breakfast, things can and will get better.“It’s all doom and gloom at Old Trafford, but I don’t see why it should be.“I’m sure before the transfer window closes they will add a couple of names to that. They already have a good squad and they need to add some top class names.“It’s basically the same squad of players. What has happened with Ander Herrera and Luke Shaw going to the club is that they’ve bought potential. If you look at Jose Mourinho, he buys the proven article and this is what Manchester United need.”United’s lack of experience in their ranks was there for all to see, with injuries and a loss of significant personnel over the summer taking its toll and Wilkins commented that this is one of the key areas that needs improving.“They’ve lost Nemanja Vidic; Rio Ferdinand and Patrice Evra. They therefore need some experienced players who know their way around the pitch to get them cracking again.“It has to improve. You saw that Louis [van Gaal] tried to play 3-5-2 and then moved to a 4-4-2 after the situation arose, but even that was exposed as was seen by playing young Jesse Lingard as a right sided wing back – he got done within the first ten minutes.”last_img read more

Read More

3 charged in slaying of Lancaster doctor

first_imgLANCASTER – Three men were charged Tuesday in the slaying of a retired plastic surgeon who was shot last year with a high-powered rifle while he was feeding livestock at his ranch near Lancaster. One of the three men, 56-year-old Nicolas Cordoba, had worked for several years for Dr. Esfandiar “Steve” Kadivar as a ranch caretaker and took over ranch operations after the doctor’s death. Cordoba then brought in a partner, Efrain Martines, 47, but the two had a falling out and Cordoba arranged to have Martines killed in April this year, prosecutors said. “Cordoba is the mastermind behind the whole thing,” Deputy District Attorney Michael Blake said. Prosecutors said Cordoba arranged for Martinez and Verdin to drive to the ranch on the afternoon the doctor was killed. Prosecutors claim Martinez and Verdin found the doctor alone, feeding his animals, and fatally shot him with a high-powered rifle. After the doctor’s death, Cordoba ran the ranch and persuaded Martines to buy in as a partner, investigators said. But after a falling out with Martines early in 2007, Cordoba promised to pay Garcia several thousand dollars if he, Martinez and Verdin would kill Martines, prosecutors said. Garcia shot Martines with an assault rifle while Martines was working at the ranch, Blake said. Blake said Martinez and Verdin helped remove the body. Martines’ body was found several miles away in a remote area near a road. karen.maeshiro@dailynews.com (661) 476-4586160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Accused of murder in the July 5, 2006, death of Kadivar were Cordoba; Antonio Martinez, 44, who lived west of the ranch; and Arturo Rosales Verdin, 40, of the San Fernando Valley. Those three and a fourth man – Marco Garcia, 31, of the San Fernando Valley – are charged with killing Martines on April 28 this year. The four defendants were being held without bail pending arraignment Thursday. The slaying of Kandivar, 64, at his sprawling 160-acre ranch baffled friends, who described him as a diligent doctor with no apparent enemies. He had grown up on a farm in Iran, and at his Antelope Valley ranch, about 15 miles west of Lancaster, he quietly raised cattle, goats, alfalfa and pistachios. Kadivar lived in the Antelope Valley for more than 30 years. He worked at Antelope Valley Hospital for 27 years before retiring in 2003. He also had offices in Palmdale and Beverly Hills, where he lived with his wife. last_img read more

Read More

When Eric met Gazza – Well-known Letterkenny man meets his Spurs hero!

first_imgLETTERKENNY man and well-known BBC Sports Journalist Eric White met up with his idol, the legendary Paul Gascoigne last night.White, a Tottenham Hotspur fanatic, attended ‘An Evening With Gazza’ at the Tullyglass House Hotel in Ballymena.The BBC Radio Foyle journalist is a life-long Spurs fan and was delighted to get the chance to meet one of his heroes. “An evening with Gazza – what a legend!” he tweeted.The night wwas compered by local personality, Pete Snodden and the crowd were entertained by football impressionist and comedian Darren Farley before hearing Gazza, the former England, Newcastle, Spurs, Lazio and Rangers, among others, midfielder, tell stories of his life and times.Gascoigne is also appearing tonight at the Armagh City Hotel.When Eric met Gazza – Well-known Letterkenny man meets his Spurs hero! was last modified: December 1st, 2016 by Chris McNultyShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Eric WhiteGazzaletterkennylast_img read more

Read More

No. 49 Men’s Tennis Setback By No. 10 Michigan

first_imgMichigan clinched the match with a 7-6 (5), 6-3 victory at No. 1 singles by Jathan Malik. The Wolverines jumped out to a 1-0 lead by winning the doubles point.  Print Friendly Version ANN ARBOR, Mich. – The 49th-ranked Drake University men’s tennis team lost to No. 10 Michigan, 4-0 on Friday at Ann Arbor, Mich. The Bulldogs will have a quick turnaround as they will play a doubleheader against Western Michigan and Michigan State on Sunday in East Lansing, Mich.center_img Sophomore Tom Hands fell to Runhao Hua 6-3, 7-5 at No. 4 singles, while Calum MacGeoch dropped his match to Kevin Wong, 6-3, 7-6 (1) at No. 3 as UM took a 3-0 advantage. DoublesNo. 1 — Kevin Wong/Jathan Malik (U-M) d. Bayo Philips/Ben Wood (Drake), 6-2No. 2 — Myles Schalet/Runhao Hau (U-M) vs. Vinny Gillespie/Tom Hands (Drake), 5-5 UnfinishedNo. 3 — Gabe Tishman/Carter Lin (U-M) d. Ben Stride/Calum MacGeoch (Drake), 6-3Order of Completion: Doubles 1-3, Singles 4-3-1 Michigan 4, Drake 0 March 10, 2016SinglesNo. 1 — Jathan Malik (U-M) d. Vinny Gillespie, 7-6 (5), 6-3No. 2 — Myles Schalet (U-M) vs. Ben Stride (Drake), 7-6 (6), 4-5 UnfinishedNo. 3 — Kevin Wong (U-M) d. Calum MacGeoch (Drake), 6-3, 7-6 (1)No. 4 — Runhao Hua (U-M) d. Tom Hands (Drake), 6-3, 7-5No. 5 — Carter Lin (U-M) vs. Barny Thorold (Drake), 6-4, 6-6 UnfinishedNo. 6 — Davis Crocker (U-M) vs. Bayo Philips (Drake), 7-6 (6), 3-3 Unfinishedlast_img read more

Read More

The Keiskamma Tapestry

first_imgIn the entrance to the South African Parliament a remarkable piece of artwork winds its way along the wall, its 120-metre length reaching through the lobby to wrap around the exterior of the chamber.This is the Keiskamma Tapestry, an exquisite embroidery in the tradition of the famous Bayeux Tapestry and the work of over 100 previously unemployed women from the Eastern Cape.Along its length, the tapestry tells the turbulent history of the Cape frontier region, from the Stone Age San through the wars and tragedies of the Xhosa people to the peaceful resolution of the 1994 elections.The embroidery depicting the San Bushmen, the earliest inhabitants of the Eastern Cape, mimics the rock art the hunter-gatherers left behind (Image: Keiskamma Trust)The artwork’s presence in Parliament reflects the kinder, more vibrant and open nature of post-apartheid South Africa. Under the old regime, forbidding portraits of the 1961 Cabinet stared down from the walls of the austere lobby – including one of HF Verwoerd, the architect of grand apartheid.Interestingly, Verwoerd features on the tapestry, at the Rand Show in 1961 – the site of the first assassination attempt against him – and right next to an image of Nelson Mandela burning his pass book during the ANC’s 1959 defiance campaign.Nelson Mandela burning his pass book during the 1959 Defiance Campaign, and HF Verwoerd, the architect of apartheid, in 1961 (Image: Keiskamma Trust)From craft to artThe tapestry is a product of the Keiskamma Trust, set up in 2000 as a skills development project in the impoverished Hamburg region of the Eastern Cape. The trust helps women of the region develop their traditional embroidery skills to produce craftwork of a scale and skill that approaches art – which has a higher premium.Inspired by the Bayeux Tapestry, created by Saxon women in 1067 to tell the story of the Norman invasion of England, the Keiskamma Tapestry follows the same form as that artwork, with a similar narrative structure.The first panel of the Bayeux Tapestry, created in 1067 (Image: Museum of Reading)It begins with the San Bushmen, the earliest inhabitants of the Eastern Cape, with embroidered replicas of the rock art images of animals and human forms the hunter gatherers left behind.It then follows the history of the Xhosa people in the region, to the arrival of the white colonial settlers, the frontier wars and the great cattle killing of 1856.In that tragic event Nongqawuse, a 15-year-old girl prophet, instructed the people to kill 400 000 of their cattle, leading to mass starvation and the end of effective Xhosa resistance to white encroachment.The great Xhosa cattle killing of 1856 (Image: Keiskamma Trust)Cattle are a dominant motif throughout the tapestry, reflecting their importance in the history and economy of the Xhosa people.The tapestry continues through the history of the Eastern Cape and South Africa as a whole, ending with the country’s first democratic elections in 1994. In creating the epic embroidery, the trust says, the women involved came to learn about their own history, which they can then disseminate throughout their community.The people of the Eastern Cape queuing to vote in the 1994 elections (Image: Keiskamma Trust)The Keiskamma Tapestry was created with funding from the Department of Arts and Culture and over 100 private donations. The Standard Bank bought the work for R500 000, and loaned it for a long-term exhibit in Parliament.It was unveiled by Parliamentary Speaker Baleka Mbete on International Women’s Day, 8 March 2006, at a ceremony attended, among others, by all of the Eastern Cape women who laboured to create it.View the full Keiskamma Tapestry on the Keiskamma Trust website.SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Read More

Mandela: a remarkable 92 years

first_imgNelson Mandela with Siphiwe Tshabalala, the South African football star who scored the very first goal of the 2010 Fifa World Cup. (Image: Nelson Mandela Foundation)President, Nobel Peace Prize laureate and statesman, Nelson Mandela, the world’s icon of reconciliation, compassion and goodwill, turns 92 on Sunday 18 July 2010.The day will be the first international Nelson Mandela Day, as declared by the United Nations in 2009. On the day, people around the world are urged to spend 67 minutes helping others, to celebrate the 67 years Mandela spent fighting apartheid.Today, US secretary of state Hillary Rodham Clinton issued a statement wishing Mandela happy birthday.“I am honoured and humbled to call President Mandela my friend,” she said. “Like millions of his admirers around the world, I am deeply moved by his generosity of spirit and unfailing courage in the face of overwhelming obstacles.“Nelson Mandela is a hero to people of all backgrounds and experience who strive for freedom and progress. His story is filled with an amazing strength and integrity of spirit. There is no one more deserving of this unprecedented international recognition, and I am delighted to offer him my warmest wishes on this special day.”Already, birthday presents are piling up at the Nelson Mandela Foundation’s gift office – many of them vuvuzela trumpets. Times Live reports that many of the presents began to arrive after the end of the 2010 Fifa World Cup, and they include a basket of books from Peru’s ambassador, a woollen hat from NGO Gogo Magic and a wooden boat from the Cameroonian soccer team.On Saturday Mandela will celebrate his birthday with South African President Jacob Zuma and other African National Congress dignitaries, and spend Sunday, his birthday, with his family, including his wife Graca Machel.An enormous legacyNelson Mandela’s 92 years have been remarkable.After spending 27 years in apartheid’s prisons, Mandela became South Africa’s first democratically elected president in 1994. He united a fraught and fearful country, bringing together blacks and whites when South Africa was living through violent and troubled times.His legacy is enormous, and most tangible in the Nelson Mandela Foundation and the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund. The former embodies the spirit of reconciliation, ubuntu and social justice, working through strategic networks and partnerships to capture the vision and values of Mandela’s life; the latter with developing programmes and partnerships to protect and improve the lives of children and youth.Out of the children’s fund grew the 46664 initiative, a worldwide concert fundraising programme to help victims and orphans of Aids.This year, his birthday was commemorated as Mandela Day, celebrated worldwide. It is hoped that the day will become a global fixture, to always remember the sacrifices Mandela made for peace and reconciliation in South Africa.Part of Mandela Day was a campaign to encourage everyone across the world to take 67 minutes in the day to do something for the good of humanity and the planet.“Mr Mandela has spent 67 years making the world a better place. We’re asking you for 67 minutes,” says the Mandela Day website.Troublemaker from the Eastern CapeNelson Rolihlahla Mandela was born on 18 July 1918 in Mvezo in the Eastern Cape province, the son of a chief of the Tembu clan of the Xhosa nation. At the age of seven he was enrolled in the local missionary school, where he was given the name “Nelson”, after the Admiral Horatio Nelson of the Royal Navy, by a Methodist teacher who found his African name difficult to pronounce. That name, Rohlihlahla, means “troublemaker”.After his father was stripped of his chieftainship following a dispute with a local magistrate, Mandela and his mother moved to the small village of Qunu. In 1927, when Mandela was nine, his father died, and the boy became the ward of the Tembu regent, Jongintaba Dalindyebo. He was to be groomed to assume high office but, influenced by the cases that came before the chief’s court, decided to become a lawyer.In 1939, after he had matriculated from school, Mandela enrolled at the University College of Fort Hare for a bachelor of arts degree. But the following year, after being suspended from college for joining in a protest boycott and fleeing an arranged marriage, he moved to South Africa’s principal city, Johannesburg.Arriving in Alexandra township in the north of the city, he found work as a guard at one of Johannesburg’s many gold mines, and later as an articled clerk at a law firm. He completed his degree by correspondence at the University of South Africa, and began to study law at the University of the Witwatersrand.In 1942 Mandela entered politics by joining the African National Congress (ANC), South Africa’s major liberation movement and today the country’s ruling party. It was during this time that he and a small group of mainly young members of the ANC embarked on a mission to transform the party into a mass movement.In 1944 he, Anton Lembede and Mandela’s lifelong friends and comrades Oliver Tambo and Walter Sisulu founded the ANC Youth League (ANCYL). That year he also married his first wife, Evelyn Mase. In 1947 he was elected president of the ANCYL.The year 1948 was a dark one in South Africa, with the election of the racist National Party, voted into government by a white electorate on the platform of apartheid. In response, in 1949, the ANC adopted its Programme of Action, inspired by the Youth League, which advocated the weapons of boycott, strike, civil disobedience and non-cooperation with authority. The programme aimed at the attainment of full citizenship and direct parliamentary representation for all South Africans. In policy documents co-written by Mandela, the ANCYL paid special attention to the redistribution of the land, trade union rights, free and compulsory education for all children, and mass education for adults.During the Campaign for Defiance of Unjust Laws in 1952, Mandela was elected the ANC’s national volunteer-in-chief and travelled the country organising resistance to discriminatory laws. He was charged and brought to trial for his role in the campaign and given a suspended prison sentence.Mandela and Tambo attorneysIn recognition of his contribution to the defiance campaign, Mandela was elected president of both the Youth League and the Transvaal region of the ANC at the end of 1952. He subsequently became the deputy president of the ANC.Soon after the defiance campaign, Mandela passed his attorney’s admission examination and was admitted to the profession. In 1952 he and Oliver Tambo opened a law firm in downtown Johannesburg.Tambo, the chairperson of the ANC at the time of his death in April 1993, wrote of their practice: “To reach our desks each morning Nelson and I ran the gauntlet of patient queues of people overflowing from the chairs in the waiting room into the corridors … Our buff office files carried thousands of these stories and if, when we started our law partnership, we had not been rebels against apartheid, our experiences in our offices would have remedied the deficiency. We had risen to professional status in our community, but every case in court, every visit to the prisons to interview clients, reminded us of the humiliation and suffering burning into our people.”The 1950s turned out to be a time of strife and tribulation for Mandela – he was banned, arrested and imprisoned. His personal life was also in some turmoil, with him divorcing Evelyn to marry Winnie Madikizela. He was also one of the accused in the historic Treason Trial that ended in 1961, with the state dropping all charges.The Black PimpernelIn 1960 police opened fire on a group of protesters in the township of Sharpeville, killing 69 people. The reaction was immediate, with demonstrations, protest marches, strikes and riots across South Africa. On March 30 1960, the government declared a state of emergency, detaining more than 18 000 people, and banning the ANC and other liberation movements.With the banning, the ANC leadership went underground and Mandela was forced to live away from his family. He was a master of disguise and managed to evade the police, a feat which earned him the nickname in the media as the Black Pimpernel.The banning also forced the ANC to move from nonviolent to violent means of opposing apartheid. Umkhonto we Sizwe, the movement’s armed wing, was formed in 1961, with Mandela as commander-in-chief. After travelling abroad for several months, he was arrested in 1962 on his return to South Africa for unlawfully exiting the country and for incitement to strike. Convicted, he was sentenced to five years on Robben Island, the notorious political prison off the coast near Cape Town.While serving this sentence, he was charged with sabotage in the infamous Rivonia Trial. In 1964 Mandela was sentenced to life imprisonment.Eighteen of Mandela’s 27 years in jail were spent on Robben island, where he carried out hard labour in a lime quarry. As a D-group prisoner, the lowest classification, he was allowed only one visitor and one letter every six months. While in prison Mandela studied by correspondence with the University of London, earning a Bachelor of Laws degree. In 1984 he was transferred to Pollsmoor Prison in Cape Town, and in December of that year he was moved to Victor Verster Prison near Paarl in the Western Cape.President of South AfricaOver the years, South Africa slowly descended into near-chaos, with almost constant unrest inside the country, armed insurgency from without, and steadily increasing international pressure from the international community to end apartheid. On 2 February 1990 the country’s National Party president, FW de Klerk, made a remarkable announcement: a negotiated settlement would end apartheid, all liberation movements would be unbanned, and all political prisoners released – including Nelson Mandela.Nine days later Mandela walked out of Victor Verster prison, his wife Winnie on his arm and his fist raised in the liberation movement salute.In 1991, at the first national conference of the ANC held inside South Africa after its decades-long banning, Mandela was elected president of the party. His long-time friend, Tambo, became national chairperson. In 1993 he and FW de Klerk were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for their different roles in the peaceful end of apartheid.In 1994, after South Africa’s first democratic elections, Mandela became president of the Republic of South Africa. That year he published his autobiography, Long Walk to Freedom, which he started writing in prison.After serving a five-year term as president of the country, Mandela ceded the ANC presidency to Thabo Mbeki. He retired from public life in June 1999, though not from the public eye. He built himself a home in his birthplace in Qunu, which he visits as often as he can.FriendshipsKnown affectionately by his clan name of Madiba, Mandela has friends across the world – Bill Clinton, Bono of U2, Naomi Campbell. His friendships go back in some cases 60 years, as with Walter Sisulu, Oliver Tambo and Ahmed Kathrada.In his autobiography Memoirs, Kathrada recounts that he and Mandela affectionately called one another madala, isiZulu for old man.“Charming and charismatic, he has both a magnetic personality and a commanding presence,” writes Kathrada. “An uncommon amalgam of peasant and aristocrat, he is a living paradox: a democrat par excellence, with just a touch of the autocrat; at once proud but simple; soft yet tenacious; obstinate and flexible; vain one moment and humble the next; infinitely tolerant but also impatient.”Kathrada and Mandela spent 18 years together on Robben Island and a further seven in Pollsmoor Prison, along with Sisulu.“For all the public exposure and media attention Madiba remains an enigma to all but his most intimate circle,” concludes Kathrada.He recounts an incident with a terminally ill girl, Michelle Britz, that is typical of Mandela. She wanted to meet Madiba, and when she met Kathrada on Robben Island, he got to know of her wish. Kathrada passed on her wish to the then president, who sprang into action immediately.“The president of South Africa, a universally respected statesman with one of the busiest schedules on earth, flew to the Mpumalanga town of Secunda by helicopter, bearing gifts for a sick child.“The emotional meeting between Madiba and Michelle was shown on national television, and as she clasped her little arms around his neck and kissed him, the eyes of millions must have filled with tears, just as mine did.”In his honourNelson Mandela has the freedom of 45 cities around the world, and honorary citizenship of 11 cities.In Johannesburg, Madiba’s image is cast in a 6m high bronze statue and stands preserved in his famous jive in Nelson Mandela Square.Speaking at the statue’s unveiling in April 2004, Ndileka Mandela, Madiba’s eldest granddaughter, said: “This is a very happy statue. The dancing stance pays tribute to the spirit of joy and celebration inherent in the people of South Africa.”The countless tributes to him around the world are without precedent. He has 23 schools, universities and institutions named after him; 25 halls, buildings, monuments and housing developments; 13 stadiums, squares, plazas, parks and gardens; 91 streets, roads, boulevards and parks; 32 bursaries and scholarships, foundations and lectures. Thirteen statues, sculptures and artworks carry his name.Madiba had collected dozens of accolades from around the world: 18 sports-related honours and awards, and 115 other awards.He has a range of strange items named after him: a landfill site, a spider, a seaslug, a protea, a tea, an orchid, a rescue dog, and a racehorse.Marriage, children and old ageMandela and Winnie divorced in 1996. In 1998 he married Graca Machel, widow of Samora Machel, the president of Mozambique until his death in 1986.The 18th of July 2010 will not only be Mandela’s 92nd birthday; it is also the 12th anniversary of his marriage to Machel. In a 2008 interview with Mike Hanna on the Al Jazeera television network, she describes how lonely Mandela was when she first met him.“After 27 years in jail, what he most longed for was not the glory of political life, but to have a family life,” she said. “It was a meeting of minds and a meeting of hearts.” Although she hadn’t wanted another marriage after Samora Machel’s death, she decided that her gift to Mandela on his 80th birthday would be to marry him.“Madiba has allowed me to continue to be myself. He has always respected my space. We have a deep sense of sharing, but at the same time we respect each other’s identities.“For a man of his age, a man who has gone through those kinds of experiences, he could have become extremely possessive. He’s not. Maybe that’s what love really means. We have found a balanced and respectful way of relating.”Today Mandela and Machel spend most of their time at their home in the upmarket suburb of Houghton, in Johannesburg. His greatest pleasure of his old age, he says, is watching the sun set, with the music of Handel or Tchaikovsky playing in the background.A short distance from the tranquil surrounds of Houghton, his famous words from the Rivonia Trial echo on the walls of the Drill Hall in central Johannesburg:“I have fought against white domination, and I have fought against black domination. I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. It is an ideal for which I hope to live and to achieve. But if it needs be, it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die.”last_img read more

Read More

Calls to Investigate EPA

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Chris ClaytonDTN Ag Policy EditorCOUNCIL BLUFFS, Iowa (DTN) — Iowa’s ethanol industry and officials are pushing back on EPA’s small-refinery waivers with demands for multiple federal investigations and demanding EPA follow court rulings.Two months ago, Mike Jerke was standing next to President Donald Trump at Southwest Iowa Renewable Energy as the president championed year-round E15. On Wednesday, Jerke, CEO of the 130-million-gallon ethanol plant, was standing next to a congresswoman calling for a federal investigation into EPA’s 31 new small-refinery waivers. Trump had promised to preserve and protect the Renewable Fuels Standard, Jerke said.On Tuesday, EPA stated to Reuters there “is zero evidence” that granting small-refinery exemptions “has had any negative impact on domestic corn ethanol producers,” Reuters reported, quoting an email from an EPA spokesman.Jerke said EPA’s 31 waivers would translate into 300 million bushels of lost corn demand. He added that the EPA’s unchecked use of small-refinery waivers “guts the RFS and breaks the president’s promise.”The Aug. 9 waiver announcement, the China trade war and USDA’s Aug. 12 crop report have combined to take potentially $10.6 billion of wealth from farmers and ethanol plants and transferred it to oil companies, Jerke said.Rep. Cindy Axne, D-Iowa, on Wednesday called on the Environmental Protection Agency’s Inspector General to investigate EPA’s rationale for granting the small-refinery waivers. Axne said EPA’s actions “eliminated millions of gallons of ethanol that had been obligated to sell.”Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds and Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig sent a letter to EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler on Wednesday asking him to reallocate ethanol gallons lost to small-refinery waivers to the Renewable Fuel Standard and to increase transparency in the program.As the president reportedly considers options in response to a rural backlash to Trump ordering the approval of 31 new waivers for 2018, Reynolds and Naig said the latest round of waivers was a “clear violation of the president’s commitments to Iowa farmers and renewable energy producers across the Heartland.”They said in the letter the “damage from these exemptions has piled up year after year and gallon after gallon. Over the last three years, the agency has undercut more than 4 billion gallons of homegrown energy, without transparency or accountability, even for so-called small-refinery exemptions offered to oil giants like Exxon and Chevron.”Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, was more direct last week when the small-refinery waivers were announced by EPA. “They screwed us,” the senior senator said.Ethanol supporters say EPA also is refusing to comply with an earlier court order to reallocate 500 million gallons of waivers from earlier years. Jerke said those gallons should be put onto the 2020 mandated ethanol volumes for refiners.Tensions are high right now in agriculture. Bruce Rohwer, a northwest Iowa farmer and board member for the National Corn Growers Association, said farmers are facing five years of stagnant prices and are watching their markets lost through different government actions in trade and ethanol waivers.“It just piles on,” Rohwer said. “The frustration has been the EPA’s failure to follow the courts. EPA to this point has just ignored that. It leaves a frustration of how do you work with a government agency that won’t recognize the authority of the courts? I don’t have the answer for that.”Rohwer said farmers just want to see positive cash flow leading to positive income again. That goes to both trade and biofuels policies that hurt farmer income.“You have to keep knocking and keep talking and keep pointing out the economic consequences of not having good markets, because it’s serious,” Rohwer said. “It must change.”The 31 waivers displaced 1.4 billion gallons of required ethanol volume for the refiners. Since the Trump administration took office, EPA has granted about 4 billion gallons in waivers. EPA has not reallocated waived gallons to other obligated parties to the RFS since at least 2016.The RFS allows the EPA to issue small-refinery exemptions for refiners that process 75,000 barrels (around 3.15 million gallons) or less of petroleum a day and demonstrate “disproportionate economic hardship.”Poet, one of the nation’s largest ethanol producers, on Tuesday said it would idle a 92-million-gallon plant in Cloverdale, Indiana, in response to EPA’s waivers. Poet had already cut production at some of its other plants in Iowa and Ohio as well. Jeff Broin, Poet’s CEO and chairman, said the company had been hurt by EPA’s decisions on the Renewable Fuels Standard.Jeff Jorgenson, a Sidney, Iowa, farmer and board member for the Iowa Soybean Association, said at the Council Bluffs event that soybean farmers would gain some further stability if Congress would reauthorize the $1-a-gallon Renewable Biodiesel Tax Credit. The tax credit expired nearly two years ago and six biodiesel plants have closed since then while Jorgenson said others are running at just 50% capacity.Geoff Cooper, president of the Renewable Fuels Association, lashed out at EPA’s statement, stating at least 15 plants have shut down or idled since EPA began issuing large volumes of small refinery exemptions last year. Meanwhile, the waivers have reduced corn use by 225 million bushels.“Farm bankruptcies and debt are on the rise, and farm income is plunging,” Cooper stated. “Yet, EPA pretends nothing is wrong. Rome is burning, while EPA plays Nero’s fiddle.”Other Iowa Democratic members of Congress Reps. Abby Finkenauer and Dave Loweback also called for an investigation by the Government Accountability Office into the small-refinery waivers. Growth Energy praised the congressman for the move.“Already, dozens of biofuel plants have closed or cut production, and hundreds of millions of bushels of grain are falling in value, just as farmers face the worst economic conditions in a generation,” said Emily Skor, CEO of Growth Energy. “The EPA needs to account for these lost gallons immediately and start repairing the damage before more rural communities lose hope for a comeback.”Chris Clayton can be reached at Chris.Clayton@dtn.comFollow him on Twitter @ChrisClaytonDTN(AG/ES)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More

WigWag Wants To Build A Lingua Franca For The Internet Of Things

first_imgWhy You Love Online Quizzes lauren orsini This morning, I had to press a switch to turn on the lights. I had to open my own blinds and turn on my own coffee maker. And I, for one, am sick of it. It’s 2013. Where’s my smart house? There are a lot of roadblocks between our low-tech homes and the Internet of Things. Most significantly, there’s no common language that allows our devices to talk to one another. See also What’s Holding Up The Internet of Things?Enter WigWag, a Kickstarter-funded sensory device that wants to change that. Part operating system, part IFTTT for your physical space, WigWag wants your smart light bulb and your smart outlet to shake hands and get acquainted.“You don’t want a smartphone app for every device in your house,” said founder Ed Hemphill. “There’s only a limited amount of value to come out of smart control. What we’re trying to do is interlink each device’s super protocols.”Your Chatty Future HomeWigWag doesn’t just give your devices a common language, it gives them something to talk about. The sensor comes with eight different plugins that allow it to detect sound, movement, temperature or even moisture. In the video, Hemphill demonstrates how you can use WigWag to automatically turn on the lights when it senses a cooler night time temperature, or send your smartphone a text when the (snail) mail is delivered. Related Posts If there was any doubt that WigWag was something people wanted, look no further than their Kickstarter. It’s nearly earned triple its funding goal and still has 30 days to go.Hemphill said the WigWag team has been especially inspired by the ways backers are planning to use their devices. For example, one backer in the UK is planning to turn his WigWag into a burglar alarm. Another is hoping to put it in her aging parents’ home so it’ll alert her to their movements and when they might need her help. What Hemphill’s noted is that many backers already take advantage of smart devices that are already on the market. They just haven’t been able to take full advantage of them yet because the devices don’t always communicate with each other. They’re trusting WigWag’s promise to change that. “A lot of backers are people who already live in smart homes, but want to make them easier to customize,” he said. “Customization is really required in automatization and that’s why cookie cutter solutions are frustrating for people.” 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac…center_img The magic happens in the code. WigWag is the first Internet of Things platform to be built on top of DeviceJS, a type of JavaScript that isn’t restricted by physical location. Since there are more than 12 communication protocols for smart devices in existence, DeviceJS serves as common ground through which these different protocols can interact. WigWag opens up the programming floodgates to millions of JavaScript-savvy developers. “You can plug in a Z-Wave dongle, a ZigBee dongle, an X10 adapter, a Insteon adapter, and over time we’ll support even more protocols,” Hemphill said. “The [WigWag] Relay also supports talking to WiFi devices like LIFX or the Phillips Hue. And cloud services such as email or Twitter.”All you need to know to use WigWag out of the box is how to drag and drop on a smartphone. The app asks you to add one or more variables, like temperature or time of day, and then an action, like “alert phone.” Voila! It’s If This, Then That for your home.For more complex operations, WigWag is offering Arduino shields for developers who want to take full advantage of that complexity.Smart Homes On Steroids How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? Tags:#DeviceJS#home#Internet of Things#smart home#WigWag Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoidlast_img read more

Read More