Category: obgvgtnyazmm

Keitany, Ghebreslassie win NYC Marathon

first_img UNOFFICIAL TIME Tatyana McFadden won the women’s wheelchair race to sweep the four major marathons for the fourth straight year. The 27-year-old American finished with an unofficial time of 1:47:43. She completed the Grand Slam by winning in London, Boston, Chicago and New York, extending her record streak to 17 straight wins in major marathons. McFadden, who won six medals at the Rio Paralympics, took the lead for good at the 15-mile mark and comfortably led the rest of the course to win for the fifth time in New York. Marcel Hug of Switzerland won his second NYC Marathon title in the men’s race and his sixth marathon this year. He edged Australia’s Kurt Fearnley by sixth-tenths of a second, repeating their photo finish at last month’s Chicago marathon. Defending champion Ernst Van Dyk of South Africa came in fourth. NEW YORK (AP): Eritrea’s Ghirmay Ghebreslassie and Kenya’s Mary Keitany won the New York City (NYC) Marathon yesterday. Keitany became the first woman to win three straight titles since Grete Waltz won five straight from 1982 to 1986. She pulled away around the 15th mile and finished with an unofficial time of 2 hours, 24 minutes, 26 seconds – one second behind her time last year. Ghebreslassie finished his debut in New York with a time of 2:7:51. For most of the course, the men’s field was a three-man race between Ghebreslassie, Kenya’s Lucas Rotich, and Ethiopia’s Lelisa Desisa. By mile 20, Ghebreslassie began gradually pulling away. The 20-year-old beat Rotich by 62 seconds to become the youngest male winner in New York. The previous youngest male winners were Alberto Salazar in 1980 and Tom Fleming in 1973, both won as 22-year-olds. Defending champion Stanley Biwott of Kenya withdrew at the 10-mile mark with a right calf injury. He also dropped out in the Rio Olympics after getting sick. American Abdi Abdirahman placed third. Desisa, who was the runner-up in New York in 2014 and a two-time Boston Marathon winner, dropped out at the 22nd mile.last_img read more

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Making the Wright plays

first_imgCarpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award MOST READ Nonito Donaire vs Naoya Inoue is BWAA 2019 Fight of the Year LATEST STORIES LA Revilla hurts hand in Phoenix win Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “It’s the only thing I wanted, man. I just wanted to win today,” he said after the Fuel Masters’ 74-72 win. “It was a big game, really important for both teams We were down all game but they let the door open. We’re just lucky to capitalize on some mistakes.”The Fil-Canadian dead shot, who had 16 points, five rebounds and three steals, said he already knew the kind of defense TNT was going to throw at him in Phoenix’s last offensive possession and he read it perfectly resulting to Kramer’s short baseline hook that won the game.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folk“I knew that they’re gonna double. I know Coach Josh (Reyes), I know the scheme that they’re trying to do, they’re not gonna let me get off a good shot. I knew right when I touched the ball, when I came off that screen that I was gonna be met with either Kelly (Williams) or Mo (Tautuaa),” he recalled.“So it was just a matter of Doug positioning himself in the right spot, and a matter of me just making a good pass. It just happened very instinctively.” Almazan vows to comeback stronger after finals heartbreak Michael Porter Jr. stays patient as playing time increases View comments Phoenix won despite playing catchup majority of the game and trailing by as much as 13.“We’re a veteran team. We have some young guys, like myself, Jason (Perkins). But we got some very savvy vets who know how to win: RJ (Jazul), JC (Intal), Willie (Wilson), Doug, Jeff (Chan). They know how to win games, they know how to close out games. So I feel like we have a good batch of guys to go far this year.”Wright likes his team’s chances heading into its last three games in the elimination round.“This is the PBA, man. Anything can happen, so we’re not taking any of those teams lightly. We are confident in our abilities, and we’re expecting to go 4-and-0 in our last four games. We took care of today, so we just gotta take care of the next three.”ADVERTISEMENT Matthew Wright. PBA IMAGESMatthew Wright turned 26 today and it was only fitting that the birthday celebrant was the one who put the icing on the cake Wednesday night.Wright accounted for Phoenix’s last five points inside the final minute, burying the game-tying triple and assisting on Doug Kramer’s game-winner with 3.0 seconds remaining.ADVERTISEMENT Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina Newsome sets focus on helping Bolts open new PBA season on right track OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ’a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ’a duplicitous move’ – Lacsonlast_img read more

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Plastic bags add up in Fort St. John

first_imgThe campaign is called “Take Me With You” and it’s a partnership between the City, NEAT and some schools in the School District 60.NEAT will also be holding a night dedicated towards the education of plastic bag usage.  There will be a film shown, called “One Less Bag,” produced by the School District 60 students.  Everyone is invited to attend the free event at the Whole Wheat and Honey Café on October 29th at 7:00 p.m. Peltier says these bags make a huge negative environmental impact.  Bags make their way into lakes and rivers, which eventually get into the ocean.So, on Saturday, members from NEAT were out in full force to spread the word on the importance of using re-usable bags.  The group covered five locations in the City, distributing materials to help people remember their re-usable bag.High School Student Kaymia Wheat was at Wal-mart, helping to distribute stickers that said, “take me with you”.  She says these stickers are meant to be put on convenient locations, like steering wheels or the rear view mirror.[asset|aid=2048|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=92293f48ecf91d4c2f238ae66945f91c-Kaymia 1_1_Pub.mp3]Advertisement Photo: Members of NEAT display some of the reminder materials that were handed out on Saturday in Wal-Mart – Christine Rumleskie/Energeticcity.caThe Northern Environmental Action Team is showing the community that even using one plastic bag every now and then, can really add up.In a new study, 42 businesses in Fort St. John monitored the amount of plastic bags that were distributed to customers for a period of 30 days.- Advertisement -Morgan Peltier from NEAT says participating businesses ranged from small independent retailers to national grocery, hardware and department chains.She says when all the figures where added together, the amount of plastic bags used totaled 307,473.[asset|aid=2047|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=92293f48ecf91d4c2f238ae66945f91c-Peltier 1_1_Pub.mp3]She says that if all businesses in Fort St. John could have monitored their bag distribution, the result would have easily exceeded 500,000.Advertisementlast_img read more

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Mikayla Capelle terrific at AHN track meet

first_imgBy Jon Zacks In all, 67 athletes took part in the competition, and 19 meet records were set.For a complete list of results, click on the attachment below. Mikayla Capelle continued her dominance over youth track and field this weekend.- Advertisement -The Dawson Creek native moved up an age class this year, but still set four new meet records at the annual Alaska Highway News Track and Field Meet in Fort St. John.Capelle set new marks in the 10 year-old girls long jump, javelin, 60 metre dash, and 100 metre dash.Other notable performances include:· Emma Lang – set a new meet record in the 9 year-old girls 60 metres (5.92 seconds) and 800 metres (3:15.6)· Danielle Harder – set new record in the 12 year-old girls 1500 metres (5:54.86)· Zoe Morrison – set new record in the 11 year-old girls javelin (11.4 metres)Advertisementlast_img read more

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Honda Classic hits some traffic

first_img“You’ve got to feel for Boo,” Villegas said. “But it’s golf. Those things happen.” Each player made par at the par-5 18th, the first playoff hole. Wilson’s was spectacular, coming after he drove his tee shot into the mud and scrambling to the green before making a 30-foot putt to keep him in contention. Wilson, 0-for-110 in tour events, also made a 45-footer to save par at the 16th hole – which, obviously, kept his hopes afloat. And Coceres – who lost a playoff to Fred Funk in Mexico at last week’s tour stop, the Mayakoba Golf Classic – had a birdie try that would have ended the tournament hit the lip and roll away. “I’m old. I’m 43,” said Coceres, who is 1-1 in playoffs on tour, and is the only member of the final foursome here to go to extra holes in a tour event. “I couldn’t see.” Weekley then made a 3-footer to earn his trip to the second playoff hole, and Villegas followed with a tap-in from about 2 feet – the final shot before play was suspended. European PGA Anton Haig won a three-way playoff with Richard Sterne and Oliver Wilson to win his first tour title at the Johnnie Walker Classic in Thailand. The three finished regular play at the Blue Canyon County Club on 13-under 275. The 20-year-old from Johannesburg knocked in a 3-foot putt for a birdie in the 18th hole shootout to win for the first time in 17 appearances on the European Tour. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! They never came. And he had to wait until this morning to get a shot at redeeming himself. Courtesy of Weekley’s miss on the final hole of regulation, he, Camilo Villegas, Mark Wilson and Jose Coceres – who all finished at 5-under 275 – went into a four-man playoff Sunday night, one that they couldn’t finish before darkness fell on PGA National. “I was shaking,” Weekley said. “I ain’t going to lie about it. I mean, I was shaking like a leaf. … I made a good stroke. I just hit it way too hard.” Play was scheduled to resume today at 5:30 a.m., with the foursome on the par-4 10th hole. With a 15-footer on the tournament’s 71st hole, the par-3 17th, Weekley took the lead and only needed a par at the last to get that win and the money. He reached the 18th green in three shots, tipping his cap as he walked up to acknowledge the long, loud serenade of “Boo.” The gallery made a much different sound moments later, when his putt slid past the left edge. center_img Only 3 feet separated Boo Weekley from everything he’s spent the last decade chasing. A PGA Tour victory, the big winner’s check, a two-year exemption, all of them a mere short putt away. He pulled his putter back in the fading light on the 72nd hole of the Honda Classic in Florida, struck the ball and waited for the cheers to rain down. last_img read more

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Global warming endangers California’s water supply

first_imgORANGE COVE – A century ago, when Harvey Bailey’s great uncle happened upon this spot where California’s Central Valley begins its ascent toward the Sierra Nevada, he could tell it was a land made for farming. Rich soils, abundant ground water, moderate temperatures. His ranch flourished as a modest family citrus farm after he planted the first tree in 1913. Three decades later came a change that would transform not only the Bailey ranch, but the entire San Joaquin Valley. A dam in the foothills to the northwest created Millerton Lake, and nine years after that – in 1952 – a canal carried water from the reservoir to farming communities lining the edge of the valley from Fresno to Bakersfield. California and the federal government had embarked on an era of building dams and hundreds of miles of canals, an ambitious engineering feat designed to capture the massive Sierra snowmelt and channel it to the state’s far-flung cities and farms. It marked the beginning of California’s population explosion and transformed the Central Valley into one of the richest agricultural regions in the world. Roughly half a century after that era ended, California finds itself forced to rethink its extensive system of capturing and delivering water. The state’s expanding population is part of the reason, but it is the effects of global climate change that have given policymakers a sense of urgency. Climate change is expected to alter California’s hydrology in dramatic ways. Scientists predict that the available supply of water may not be able to meet demand, while the existing levee and reservoir system will be insufficient to contain spring flooding. Finding solutions and ways to pay for them already is proving contentious, opening a new chapter in California’s ongoing saga of water wars. The debate has teamed farmers and metropolitan water planners, who argue for more dams and canals, in a battle against environmentalists and the Democrats who control the Legislature. They favor conservation and oppose any measures that will leave a heavy imprint on the environment. California’s era of dam-building helped the Bailey ranch evolve from a humble family farm into a massive citrus operation with 2,000 acres of orange and lemon trees. Harvey Bailey believes a transformation similar to the one California undertook more than half a century ago will be required to ensure its farms and cities thrive in the decades ahead. “You can’t sit on your thumbs and not plan for the future,” Bailey said. “Planning for the future means you’ve got to have more water supplies you can draw on year round.” Vulnerable resource California requires a lot of water, mostly for its nearly $32 billion-a-year agriculture industry. The state uses 43.1 million acre feet a year, enough water to fill three Lake Tahoes. Yet scientific models show the state’s water supply to be the natural resource most vulnerable to the effects of rising global temperatures. The state’s leading scientists and hydrologists generally agree on the potential consequences. Among them: The Sierra snowpack is expected to shrink and melt faster, leaving insufficient supplies for cities, farms and hydroelectric plants during the hottest months of summer and fall, when demand is greatest. Prolonged droughts along the Colorado River will force California and six other Western states to reduce the amount they draw from that river. Earlier melting of the snowpack coinciding with spring storms could overwhelm any part of the 1,600 miles of earthen levees, flooding Central Valley communities that have seen an explosion of suburban growth in recent years. A rising Pacific Ocean or a levee break will bring salty ocean water into the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, the heart of the state’s water-delivery system. That would jeopardize the fresh water supplies for 23 million Californians, two-thirds of the state’s population. To avoid that scenario, a plan to build a $3 billion canal to divert water around the delta is back in play. It already is generating dissension, however, much as it did a generation ago when Northern California voters defeated the proposed Peripheral Canal, fearing too much of their water would be sent south. The most crucial part of California’s water system is the snowpack that builds each winter along the 400-mile-long Sierra Nevada. It acts as California’s natural reservoir, holding a third of the state’s water for drinking and irrigation. For decades, the cycle has remained relatively unchanged: The snowpack builds through winter and early spring, then melts gradually from late spring through midsummer. That allows the reservoirs to fill and state water managers to release the water in late summer and fall, operating on a schedule that satisfies cities and farmers. Warming temperatures already are beginning to disrupt that pattern. The snowpack has shrunk about 10 percent below its wintertime average, and models show it shrinking 25-50 percent by the end of the century as more precipitation falls as rain rather than snow. “We’re going to have more water when we don’t want it and less water when we want it,” said John Dracup, an environmental engineering professor at the University of California at Berkeley and an expert on California’s hydrology. Expensive solutions The options for coping with the expected changes vary widely but have a common thread: All are expensive. Farmers, agricultural irrigation districts and some city water managers favor creating more reservoirs, an idea that has at least the partial backing of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. He has proposed spending $4.5 billion to build one reservoir in a valley north of Sacramento and another in a canyon above Millerton Lake near Fresno. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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DOUBLE LOYALTY CARD POINTS FOR TWO WEEKS AT ECLIPSE CINEMAS LIFFORD/STRABANE

first_imgENTERTAINMENT: Management at Eclipse Cinemas Lifford/Strabane are giving loyal customers Double points from Friday 29th April to May 12th.  Eclispe Classic: Kids Club  Sat & Sun & Mon (Bank Holiday)  @ 12noon(Saturday 7th &  Sunday 8th  May)Films this week are: Alvin & the ChipmunksOddball & the PenguinsTickets €1.80 eachCrazy Tuesday – All Tickets All Day €4.00Over 50’s Wednesday – Tickets €5.00Thursday Meal Deal – Ticket + Med Drink & Popcorn €10Check out all our listings @ www.eclipsecinemas.comFilms available this week include: Gift vouchers available: X-Men Triple Bill and Midnight Show: DOUBLE LOYALTY CARD POINTS FOR TWO WEEKS AT ECLIPSE CINEMAS LIFFORD/STRABANE was last modified: May 5th, 2016 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Eclipse CinemasEntertainmentFeaturesnewsticketslast_img read more

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IN PICTURES – MOMENTS DONEGAL TOWN BAND WERE CROWNED ALL-IRELAND CHAMPIONS

first_imgBand Leader Shannon Cassidy leads the band in the parade in Cavan after the competitionDONEGAL have won the All-Ireland – the All-Ireland Band Champions.The Donegal Town Community Band won at the All Ireland Fleadh Cheoil in Cavan at the weekend.“It was a superb weekend for us,” said Orla Hamilton. “Our band members are aged from just seven to 15 and they all put in a superb performance.“Hopefully there’s another All-Ireland title on the way!”Shannon standing with the other Band Leaders awaiting the announcement of the resultsThe band execute a bow and march out of the arena following their championship winning routine   IN PICTURES – MOMENTS DONEGAL TOWN BAND WERE CROWNED ALL-IRELAND CHAMPIONS was last modified: August 21st, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:IN PICTURES – MOMENTS DONEGAL TOWN BAND WERE CROWNED ALL-IRELAND CHAMPIONSlast_img read more

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Saragosa pays immediate dividends for Galaxy

first_img The defeat was the Wizards’ first at Home Depot Center since a 2-1 loss to Los Angeles on June 14, 2003 their first visit to the Galaxy’s home field. “It’s good to get back on track,’ Galaxy defender Chris Albright said. “Especially against what I think is always a tough team.’ CARSON — The Galaxy, continuing its maddening penchant for inconsistent play this season, got a lift from an unexpected source on Sunday and defeated a rival that hadn’t lost in Home Depot Center in more than two years. Midfielder Marcelo Saragosa, who joined the team only 10 days ago and is highly regarded more for his defensive work, headed in a free kick in the 74th minute for his first MLS goal to give the Galaxy a hard- earned, 2-1 victory over the Kansas City Wizards in front of an announced crowd of 22,552. The Galaxy, which has been its own worst enemy of late remember Troy Roberts’ back pass that skipped past goalie Kevin Hartman for a FC Dallas goal last week? almost made another costly blunder in the opening moments. Kansas City’s Jose Burciaga Jr. attempted a corner kick in the second minute of play, and the Galaxy’s Pete Vagenas attempted to direct it out of danger right in front of Hartman. The only problem was Vagenas’ header was heading right into the net, but only a brilliant, reflex save by Hartman prevented the Wizards from taking a 1-0 advantage. The next 30 minutes were uneventful until Kansas City had another great chance when its leading scorer, Scott Sealy, got around Galaxy defender Todd Dunivant and raced in toward the Los Angeles goal. Hartman came out to challenge, but Sealy evaded him, and his shot from less than five yards went off the crossbar and bounced harmlessly away. Then it was the Galaxy’s turn to mount a challenge, and it made good on its first real scoring opportunity. Landon Donovan gave a nice through ball to Herculez Gomez, whose shot from just inside the penalty area went into the far corner of the net past Wizards goalie Bo Oshoniyi for a 1-0 lead. The Wizards made it 1-1 in the 72nd minute when Jimmy Conrad, a graduate of Temple City High School and former walk-on at UCLA, gave a nice pass to Josh Wolff, who beat rookie defender Ugo Ihemelu for the equalizer. Larry Morgan can be reached at (626) 962-8811, Ext. 2272 or by e-mail at larry.morgan@sgvn.com. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!center_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe top 10 theme park moments of 2019 Saragosa was more than happy to help out after coming on in the 40th minute for Paulo Nagamura, who suffered a bruised right leg. Saragosa, who had started 24 games last season and had one assist, was playing in Brazil before rejoining the team. He said he already feels good in his new surroundings. “A lot of people have been very helpful … Tyrone (Marshall), Pete (Vagenas),’ he said. “I’m very happy I can contribute.’ “We know Marcelo from last year,’ Marshall said. “He fits right in … it’s not like’s out of sync. He got the winning goal for us, and that’s a good confidence-builder, for us and for him.’ It was just last Wednesday that the Galaxy was humbled by FC Dallas, 4-1, in arguably one of its lowest points of the season. But Los Angeles rebounded with one of its better performances despite wading through a stunning six minutes of extra time. “I’ve never seen six minutes,’ Galaxy head coach Steve Sampson said. “I thought it was way too much.’ last_img read more

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How (Older) Homes Work

first_imgOpportunities for builders to obtain building science education may seem scant, but opportunities for people who own and operate buildings — particularly homeowners — are even rarer. About two years ago, this lack led to my developing a class for homeowners called “How (Older) Homes Work” (HOHW). My good friend and colleague, Steve Snider, really got got the ball rolling when he suggested that I come to his community (Newton, Massachusetts) to do this training as a two-evening seminar through a group called Historic Newton. The students were members of Historic Newton who owned and (frankly) needed help with their older homes. We intentionally set the two sessions a week apart, giving attendees a chance to digest the basics of building science and building performance, and to come back the next week with key questions and even their own projects for discussion.RELATED ARTICLESDo Homeowners Need to Understand Home Performance?Embarking on the Building Science Learning CurveGreen Building for BeginnersEnergy Upgrades for Beginners Building science basics for homeowners I have now done about a half dozen HOHWs in Vermont and Massachusetts. Most recently, the Western Massachusetts Green Consortium hosted HOHW at the World War II Club in Northampton, drawing over 60 people the first night with about 45 returning the following week. Here’s how the educational sessions were described in a Northampton HOHW press release: “Session 1, February 27, examines how heat and moisture interact in buildings, and looks at some building science ‘puzzles.’ As we make our homes more energy efficient, we shift the energy-moisture balance and potentially damage that building or compromise the health of occupants. Session 2, March 6, is an opportunity to bring your own building science puzzles and questions and will conclude with a survey of the tools and techniques used to diagnose building issues and energy efficiency.” The homeowner interest and demand for building performance knowledge is there. Here are some post-event survey comments from Northampton attendees: “Lots of good in-depth information.” “Very eye-opening; thank you!” “Could have used a third session!” “Excellent delivery of this information – so fundamental – so interesting!” “I understand some things that are going on in my home now.” Rules for this type of educational session Here is what I have learned from the How Older Homes Work events so far: We need to ensure that home inspectors, building performance auditors, and high-performance remodelers are all up-to-date on their building science knowledge so that homeowners can connect the results from the work of each. The internet is a double-edged sword for homeowners; they have access to a tidal wave of information about buildings, but the information generally overwhelms them rather than informing or guiding them. Scheduling a week between the two 2.5-hour sessions is really important. Everyone needs time to chew on so much new information. Start with simple, basic information, but don’t eliminate technical content; attendees will find their own level of understanding, which changes over time and with further study. Start with basic rules and then build to more complex examples. For example: Manage building performance in this order: water leaks, air leaks, drying, heat. Existing building performance is more complicated than new; with existing buildings, you need to assess and understand historical performance and current performance before you can improve building performance. There are three sources of moisture in buildings: the enclosure, the mechanical systems, and the occupants. They interact, so improving building performance almost always involves all three. Avoid building industry jargon and acronyms. (This is one I struggle with.) Homeowners only? Are “How (Older) Homes Work” events for building industry professionals as well as homeowners? I do encourage homeowners who are working with a builder or architect to bring the builder or architect with them. I also encourage building industry professionals to bring clients or prospective clients. But take care: this event is for homeowners, not the industry. On the second night of the Northampton HOHW, I let detailed technical questions from building professionals drive too much of the discussion and ran out of time for covering homeowner questions or an epic case study that one homeowner brought. Homeowners can use a questionnaire when interviewing designers or builders For the GBA community, one element introduced at the HOHW sessions is worth considering: a questionnaire for homeowners to use as they interview prospective building professionals for their project. Here is a link to the questionnaire. This is a draft document, and I am sure we can improve and sharpen this tool. I believe it is a tool for both homeowners and building professionals to use. For both, it is a way to distinguish high performance building in the marketplace. Author’s note: Many thanks to the Sustainable Energy Outreach Network and its staff (Guy Payne and Theresa Spear) for working with Building-Wright to make more of the HOHW events available to New England communities.   Peter Yost is GBA’s technical director. He is also the founder of a consulting company in Brattleboro, Vermont, called  Building-Wright. He routinely consults on the design and construction of both new homes and retrofit projects. He has been building, researching, teaching, writing, and consulting on high-performance homes for more than twenty years, and he’s been recognized as NAHB Educator of the Year. Do you have a building science puzzle? Contact Pete here.last_img read more

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