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In Your Neighbourhood

first_imgtomorrowThe 2016 Clarendon Netball Association (CNA) season begins tomorrow at the Mineral Heights Sports Complex, with the start of the Jamalco Open League.As usual, the first day of competition will feature an opening rally of the 21 teams that have been registered. The opening ceremony, which begins at 1:30 p.m., will feature newly elected President of Netball Jamaica, Dr. Paula Daley-Morris, as guest speaker.Long-standing chief organiser, Winston Nevers told The Gleaner all is in place for asuccessful start.He said: “The people always look forward to the Jamalco League as you know that when Jamalco is involved the sponsorship is sure and things will be in place.”The competition is in its 17th year.Sporting Central, Jamalco head Venom on top in domino competition’s first roundVenom finished on top in the first round of the inaugural Orville Higgins/Caribbean Classic five-team franchises cross the table domino competition, which took place at Classic home ground, Portmore Drive.Venom finished on 63 points, five clear of Warriors in second, followed by Destroyers 51, Legend 49 and Punisher, who ended on 11 points, but failed to make it to the second round. All teams played eight matches each.The second phase of the competition gets under way tomorrow and will see the four teams that advanced playing each other twice, in a round robin format.At the conclusion, the top two teams play each other in the first preliminary round match, with the winner going straight to the final, while the loser goes to the second preliminary round. The third and fourth place teams play each other to decide who will take on the loser from the first preliminary round match. The winner of the second preliminary round match will move on to the final, where the winner will be crowned kingpins of cross the table dominoes.The competition will see the biggest monetary payout ever offered locally, with the winning team walking away with $600,000 and the second place team $400,000, while the team finishing third will receive $200,000.Mandeville hosts Street Gun contestThe Manchester Rifle and Pistol Club will host the first leg of the Jamaica National Street Gun Championships tomorrow at its Lincoln range, near Spur Tree. Starting time is 10 a.m., although the range will be opened at 8:30 a.m. to accommodate practice.The Street Gun contest is a popular shooting competition as it is categorised as a ‘minor affair’, meaning the firearm required is the regular carry-on weapon by ordinary licensed firearm holders. No rigs are attached, hence all competitors, including the established professionals, compete with the same disadvantages.Additional excitement is also created by the nature of the stages. There will be eight requiring only 100 rounds. The stages will be created to resemble practical scenarios and will test the shooter’s skill and ability to respond quickly.The organisers have promised trophies for first and second positions in each division. Food and refreshments will also be free.Tight battle for Manchester Major League semisWith just one round to complete, it remains anybody’s bet the three other teams that will join Hillstars in the semi-finals of Manchester Football Association (MFA) Magnum/Captain’s Bakery Major League competition.Hillstars are the unassailable leaders from Group One with 35 points and also the overall leaders in the 12-team slate. They are two points clear of their nearest challenger in Group One, but maintaining the overall lead is significant as the MFA awards a tidy sum to the team which accumulates the most points at the completion of the preliminary rounds, which includes return legs in group play, as well as cross zone matches.In the overall standings, Hillstars hold a slim lead over Ricam Academy (33) and Alligator Pond (32). Downs (31) are out of that contest, but are still in the pecking for a semi-final spot.Ricam, Alligator Pond and Downs are in a tight race to claim two semi-final slots from Zone Two. All three are therefore faced with must win scenarios.Meanwhile, Mile Gully (23) and Georges Valley (21) have the best chance of joining Hillstars from Group One. Either team must also win their final match and hope the other loses.In the penultimate round of matches played earlier this week, Georges Valley scored goals in the fourth and fifth minutes to defeat Greenvale United 2-1, Hillstars outscored Mile Gully 3-1, while in the biggest surprise of the day, Alligator Pond beat Downs in their own backyard 3-1.Clarendon netball season begins quarter-final chargeFormer National Premier League campaigners, Sporting Central Academy, as well as defending champions Jamalco, headline the qualifiers for the quarter-finals of the Captain’s Bakery-sponsored Clarendon Major League.Sporting Central qualified unbeaten from Zone Three with 20 points from six wins and two draws. They lead two other qualifiers from this group, namely Moores and Original Hazard, which both finished on 11 points. The latter qualified as one of two best third-placed teams, since there were three zones with two automatic qualifiers.Jamalco topped Group Two ahead of New Bowens. The champions mined 22 points from six wins and a draw. They scored 20 goals and conceded just once.Zone I, which featured the closest of the preliminarybattles, is headed by Kemps Hill (15), York Town (13) and Comfort (12).Starz Academy gain Manchester Division One leadStarz Academy have taken over the lead of the Jamalco-sponsored Manchester Division One. Starz Academy leapfrogged Technical Strikers after shutting out Mandeville United 3-0 earlier this week. They now have 10 points, one more than Technical Strikers, who have played one game less.Los Perfectos, who are making a return to the Manchester league after an absence of 10 years, are in third position with eight points from four games. Their second win of the season came on Tuesday, after a 2-0 effort against 360 degrees Youth Football Academy.Fourth on goal difference are Plowden, who walloped Epping Forest 4-0. They lead five other teams who have mined four points. Fourth is narrowly held on goal difference by Trinity, who have four points. In fact, the latter leads a quartet of teams who have also mined four points.Black Star, St Bess FC lead semi-final charge in St ElizabethWith just two rounds to complete the preliminary phase of the St Elizabeth Magnum Major League, defending champions Black Star sit pretty on top of the standings. In fact, their total of 43 points cannot be surpassed.Last Sunday, they celebrated their quarter-final berth with a 2-1 win over form team St Bess FC. On Wednesday, they added the scalp of Tafari Lions with a 1-0 win.Despite the loss to Black Star, St Bess FC (32) are still poised for a semi-final berth in their first year at Major League, after rebounding with a crucial 1-0 win over Holland Police Youth Club (28) who are also eager to make the semi-final cut.Other teams in the reckoning for semi-finals are Real Treasure Beach (26) and Appleton and Super Action. However, the latter two must win their remaining two games and hope for adverse results from the front-runners.Spit Fyah on topSpit Fyah domino team has carved out a four-point lead atop the standings of the City of Kingston Cooperative Credit Union Portmore Domino League after the ninth round of matches last Sunday.Spit Fyah (33 points) won their eighth match of the season, as they outclassed third place Right Stuff (29) 300-274. Spit Fyah’s nearest rivals, Exceptional International, cut down Soursop Tree 300-281. Exceptional International lead Right Stuff with a better points average.In other games, Waterhouse United got past Highlight Strikers 300-289, eighth-placed Eradication humbled Ken’s Wildflower 300-280, Fort International blew away Chedwin Strikers 300-266, Spring Village scolded Correctional Services300-268, while Garveymeade whipped Felluchie Strikers 300-258.Games on tomorrow (Home teams named first): Masterpiece vs Ken’s Wildflower; Exceptional International vs Highlight Strikers, Passagefort United vs Garveymeade, Spring Village vs Soursop Tree, Right Stuff vs Naggo Head, Chedwin Strikers vs Correctional Services, Spit Fyah vs Memory Lane, Felluchie Strikers vs Eradication and Waterhouse United vs Fort International.Cumberland, Racing replay for KO crownThe final of the York Pharmacy-sponsored Portmore Division Two knockout football competition between Cumberland and Racing United was rained out at the Cedar Grove Sports Complex last Sunday. A new date for this match will be announced shortly by the organisers.In semi-final action recently, Cumberland defeated Cedar Grove 2-1, while Racing’s win over Braeton United was a no-contest as the Gregory Park-based club ran out 4-1 winners over Braeton, the side that took home the midseason crown.Church cricket begins March 19The Power of Faith Ministries (PFM) Twenty20 Church Cricket League commences on Saturday, March 19, with adouble-header at Bridgeport Sports ground.Defending champions Power of Faith International will start against their brother team Power of Faith Development at 10 a.m., while at 2 p.m., Faith Temple New Testament will oppose Portmore Gospel Assembly.The league will be staged on a round robin format and the two top teams will advance to the final.”There is also a new development this year as an over-50 match is being planned during the course of the competition,” said Mark Williamson, coordinator of the competition.The competition is used as a tool to bring fellowship among churches and to seek souls for the Kingdom of Heaven.last_img read more

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Shotgun, ammo found at Mango Landing

first_imgPolice are currently investigating the circumstances surrounding the discovery of an improvised shotgun and ammunition, which were found on Friday at a shack at Mango Landing in Region 10 (Upper Demerara-Berbice).Reports are the gun and ammo were found at about 08:15h after officers from E Division (Linden-Kwakwani) acted upon information. A search was conducted and the improvised 12-gauge shotgun and 10 live cartridges were subsequently unearthed.last_img

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Chairman has no authority to debar Sooba – Commissioner

first_imgLGC controversy…claims some Commissioners seeking to cover up wrongdoingsThe Chairman of the Local Government Commission (LGC), Mortimer Mingo, has no authority to remove Commissioners from committee meetings since the Commission is a constitutional body.Commissioner Carol SoobaThis is according to LGC Commissioner Clinton Collymore, who spoke to Guyana Times on Monday in the wake of a fellow Commissioner, Carol Sooba being barred from attending deliberations on City Hall’s Commission of Inquiry (CoI) findings.Collymore pointed out that based on legal advice provided, Mingo unlawfully acted outside of his capacity and they intended to address this matter at the next meeting.“We’re going to raise the matter again when we have another meeting, because they intend to pursue this matter. We have gotten legal advice and we were told that the Chairman doesn’t have that authority and the Local Government Commission doesn’t have the authority to expel a member because it is a constitutional body,” said Collymore.He opined that Sooba was experienced in the Mayor and City Council’s operations and the LGC was allegedly attempting a cover-up. He also hinted that this outcome was linked to a political card, played by the Chairman to dissolve some of the recommendations in the report.Commissioner Clinton Collymore“There are other reasons for this. One of the reasons is that she was at the municipality for a very long time and she has some institutional knowledge as to what is going on and they don’t want that exposed.”Sooba confirmed that she was asked to recuse herself from a particular meeting where those discussions would be convened. She was told afterwards that she could not sit on the meeting to discuss other matters upon the insistence of the Chairman and Vice Chairman Andrew Garnet.In this regard, Collymore stated, “The Commission agreed to recuse her from her matter, but in the interim, it seems as though the Chairman got other advice. He is saying that she has to recuse herself from the entire Commission.”LGC Chairman Mortimer MingoWhen contacted for an invited comment on Saturday, former Attorney General Anil Nandlall also condemned these actions, positing that the CoI would have compiled the findings and the LGC was only responsible for implementing the report. While rejecting the decision to prevent Sooba from sitting at the meetings, the Attorney posited that her presence was essential to her appointment as a Commissioner.“I reject such a notion, because the Local Government Commission is simply engaged in considering the report and possibly, to recommend or implement these recommendations. The Commission is not making any findings. Those findings have already been made by the CoI. I cannot imagine how Sooba’s presence can influence or prejudice,” said Nandlall.“On what basis are you excluding her? The report is already completed. What is going on now is examining the report to determine its implementation. As a duly appointed member of the Commission, if the Commission was assigned that responsibility, then she must play a part,” he was quoted as saying.Disciplinary measures were recommended for senior staffers of the Mayor and City Council with the Town Clerk, Royston King as the chief for gross misconduct. Some of the officers are expected to appear before the Commission next Wednesday.Efforts by this publication to contact the Chairman proved futile, since he was not in office and his phone was unreachable.last_img read more

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Turf war

first_imgThe ironic thing about the power struggle between the LAPD and the LAX police is that the argument over which keeps the airport safer puts all of us in danger. And it’s up to the commander-in-chief of both departments – Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa – to put an end to the differences and find a solution to questions raised about public safety. The tension between the Los Angeles Police Department and the Los Angeles Airport Police has been brewing for years. It boiled over last week when LAPD Chief William Bratton came out against legislation that would expand the LAX police force’s duties at the airport when it came to bomb scares and crowd control. If that happens, Bratton warned, the airport force wouldn’t be up to the LAPD’s snuff. Now it’s a great thing that Bratton is so proud of the men and women of the LAPD, and it’s understandable that his understaffed department would like to take over the LAX police jobs. But bad-mouthing the LAX police – though there may be some truth here – comes off as just another salvo in the turf war, undermining public confidence. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2Currently, the LAX police force of 400 cooperates with the 59 LAPD officers assigned to the airport, the Transportation Security Agency, Immigration, ATF and various other law-enforcement agents working at the busy international hub. Bratton has raised the stakes by questioning the training and competence of the airport police; Villaraigosa has chastised the chief and defended the airport police. Others are choosing up sides. Yet the idea of merging the two forces won’t die. The latest attempt came 13 months ago in the form of Measure A, which would have merged the two forces. A compelling case for the merger wasn’t made, and the majority of voters said no. Now it’s up to Villaraigosa to put an end to the squabbling and answer the rising public concerns that LAX is less than fully safe. If Bratton is indeed correct that LAX officers aren’t up to the same training level as the LAPD’s officers, then they ought to get that training. If their recruitment practices are inferior, they need to be fixed. Whatever it takes, it’s on the mayor. This drawn-out battle isn’t making anyone feel safer.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Lancers seeking a new beginning versus Fullerton

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week Kickoff is 7 p.m. at Cal State Fullerton. PCC (1-4) is led offensively by quarterback Carlos Celis. He has completed 64 of 129 passes (49.6 percent) for 723 yards, five touchdowns and five interceptions. Fullerton running back Joe Chatman has rushed for 928 yards and 11 touchdowns on 142 carries (6.5 average). — Robert Morales 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Tonight’s game against Fullerton College is a Mission Conference American Division opener, so the Lancers could look at this as a fresh start. But PCC has been out-scored 148-78 on the season, so it’s hard to imagine its fortunes turning. In addition, Fullerton is 5-0 and ranked No. 3 in Southern California. center_img When Pasadena City College opened the football season with a victory over Los Angeles Valley College, there was optimism for a program that had gone 3-17 the past two seasons. Alas, the Lancers have not won since, losing four consecutive games. Last week was a low point, as PCC was trounced at home by Santa Ana College, 50-7. last_img read more

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Bang Bang club lives on in film

first_imgThe cover of the book written by GregMarinovich And Joao Silva on which thefilm is based.(Image: Axis gallery) The haunting eyes of Kevin Carter abovethe Pulitzer Prize winning picture thatultimately cost Carter his life.(Image: HBO)Khanyi MagubaneFilming of The Bang Bang Club, a movie which reveals the lives and times of four photojournalists who captured the harrowing violence of the apartheid South Africa, is underway in Johannesburg.Based on the lives of photographers Ken Oosterbroek, Joao Silva, Kevin Carter and Greg Marinovich, the movie tells the true story of the four men, recounting their relationships with each other and the stresses, tensions and moral dilemmas of working in situations of extreme violence, pain and suffering.Hollywood stars who signed up for the feature include, Ryan Phillippe (Greg Marinovich) Taylor Kitsh (Kevin Carter) and Malin Akerman (as photo editor, Anna).The film follows the journey of the four photographers as they venture into dangerous territory to capture the images that shocked the world about the brutal violence during the apartheid era.South African documentary producer Steven Silver is directing the film.Silver, who began his career in the South African film industry, before writing and co-producing Gerrie & Louise, an international Emmy award-winning, feature-length documentary for the US TV channel CBC in 1997.He has directed several documentaries for the History Channel and Discovery Channel.Silver is also respected for the critically acclaimed The Last Just Man, which won over 14 international awards.To his movie credits, Silver has written and directed six films for movie studio Barna-Alper Productions, including Box Car Rebellion; Doctor’s Strike; The Last Just Man; The Anglo Boer War; and The Dark Years.He has a law degree from the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg.Telling real life storiesThe film has been adapted from Greg Marinovich and Joao Silva’s book, The Bang Bang Club, and it recounts true stories of the four men.The plot tracks the relationships with each other, the stresses that came with the job and surviving both as humans and journalists.Between the four journalists, they have captured images of iconic moments in South Africa’s history like the Boipatong massacres, as well as the Shell House massacres, which made front-page news across the world.The photos illustrate the brutality inflicted on black South Africans by the police and armed forces, as well as the clashes between African National Congress and Inkatha Freedom Party supporters.In 1994, during the famous Thokoza township hostel violence outbreak, Ken Oosterbroek, who was on site to photograph the incident, was shot dead in the cross-fire. Marinovich was injured in the same riots.Kevin Carter committed suicide in the same year that he won the prestigious Pulitzer Prize for his famous photograph of a Sudanese child and a vulture ominously standing behind the bone-thin child.In as much as he celebrated his win of the Pulitzer, Carter was also devastated by the amount of criticism about his picture.According to a Time magazine feature entitled, The life and death of Kevin Carter, some journalists in South Africa called his prize a “fluke,” alleging that he had somehow set up the picture.Others questioned his ethics. “The man adjusting his lens to take just the right frame of her suffering,” read the St. Petersburg Times, “might just as well be a predator, another vulture on the scene.”Even some of Carter’s friends questioned why he didn’t help the starving, barely alive child.Two months after receiving the award, Carter was found dead inside his truck, where he had gassed himself.Greg Marinovich also won a Pulitzer for his image of an ANC member hacking to death Lindsay Tshabalala after he had been set alight.Speaking to The Times newspaper, Marinovich expressed his excitement about the Hollywood production.“I have some mixed feelings because you never know how the movie will turn out. But it is exciting to know our story will be told,” he said.Silva, who now works for The New York Times, said the movie would contribute in “keeping the memory of Ken Oosterbroek and Kevin Carter alive.”He said it was important to him that the movie kept the truth about their experiences,“The plan is to guide the producers into bringing a real portrayal of what it was like in those days to the screen. The book was in many ways a token of love for what we went through.”In preparation for their roles, Marinovich and Silva are working closely with the directors, “We are being consulted on the final script because the producers want it to be authentic,” he said.The two photographers will also meet the actors before shooting starts to familiarise them with the story’s historical context.They will also show the actors what went into a typical day in the life of four almost recklessly brave photojournalists, to assist them in understanding the true nature of being journalism in tumultuous conditions.Useful linksThe Bang Bang Club – the book The death and times of Kevin CarterThe Pulitzer prizelast_img read more

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Record number of passengers take wing

first_imgIn a year of upheaval and discontent at least one story sparkled: “Air travel was a good news story in 2016,” asserts Alexandre de Juniac, Director General and CEO of the International Air Transport Association. New routes and low fares helped prompt a record number of people to fly.“Three-point-seven billion of them flew safely to their destination,” says the IATA chief. Airlines forged some 700 new routes, linking the world ever more closely, this as average roundtrip airfares fell by US$44.And the show isn’t over yet. Juniac says,“Demand for air travel is still expanding. The challenge for governments is to work with the industry to meet that demand with new infrastructure,” Translation: we need more runways, new terminals and new airports to cover demand.By the numbers, total international passenger traffic skyrocketed 6.7 percent compared to 2015. Capacity—essentially seats and flights—rose by 6.9 percent. Load factors—the percentage seats filled by paying passengers—fell by just a whit, to 79.6 percent. Here is a breakdown of international activity by region:Buoyed by the likes of Emirates, Etihad andQatar the Middle East saw the most robust growth of all regions: 11.8 percent.As it has been for a while now, Asia-Pacific was robust. Demand there increased by 8.3 percent compared to 2015.Despite what IATA calls “some economic and political uncertainty” traffic was up by 7.4 percent among Latin American carriers, even as Latin airlines put on 4.8 percent in capacity.Not since 2012 has activity been as strong in Africa, where determined demand for seats to and from Asia and the Middle East means international traffic among that continents air carriers shot up 7.4 percent. Capacity precisely matched demand.In Europe, international traffic climbed by 4.8 percent in 2016, this while seat capacity gained 5.0 percentage points.Bringing up the rear in terms of international air traffic was North America, whose driving force was the United States. Traffic demand inched up by just 2.6 percent last year. Despite the ongoing consolidation of carriers in the region capacity rose 3.3 percent. Had it not been for strong passenger demand for seats on the transpacific the numbers here would have been even softer.That’s’ the scene as far as international air traffic is concerned. IATA says domestic air travel grew by a healthy 5.1 percent, on average. Interesting to note here that all major markets, save for Brazil, showed some growth.The International Air Transport Association represents some 265 air carriers all told. Together they account for 83 percent of global air traffic.last_img read more

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Read to Rise gets kids hooked on books

first_imgBy offering these children a chance to own books, they hope that the sense of ownership will strengthen their interest in reading. (image: Read to Rise)In a bid to address some of the harsh realities of growing up in underprivileged areas, Read to Rise offers South African youth a chance to discover new worlds through reading.As one of the country’s core focuses, education is extremely important with regards to moulding the leaders of the future and arming them with the skills and knowledge necessary for them to lead productive lives and become contributing members of society.The Read to Rise non-government organisation (NGO) was established in 2013 by couple Athol Williams and Taryn Lock, who between them boast seven academic degrees and vast business experience.Born from their shared passion for literacy, education and helping others reach the heights of their potential, the Read to Rise organisation has been working with youth from under-resourced communities such as Mitchell Plain and its surrounding areas near Cape Town.“Athol grew up in Mitchells Plain so he knows the challenges that these young children face,” says Lock.With a large number of schools lacking properly stocked libraries – some lacking libraries all-together – the Read to Rise organisation offers children suitable reading material fitting for their age groups in an attempt to instil a love of reading early on in life.“Read to Rise aims to inspire children to read in under-resourced communities. As the name indicates, we firmly believe that children need to read in order to rise in their personal development and contribution to society,” says Lock. “We believe that children who love to read will excel at school and go on to become constructive citizens. It all starts with reading.”AN EARLY STARTAccording to Read to Rise, children in their foundational phase of education should be reading around 40 books a year that are suited to their level. Their findings suggest that children in the areas they operate read one or two books, which fall far short of the recommendation.This is due to the lack of motivation to pick up a book and read. To address this, Read to Rise visits to hold interactive reading sessions with the children.The organisation has taken a different angle when it comes to encouraging a good reading ethos amongst school children. By offering these children a chance to own books, they hope that the sense of ownership will strengthen their interest in reading.Lock says that they “believe that book ownership is important so give children their own new book to take home.“In addition, we place a Mini-Library – which is a brightly painted bookshelf which contains 50 new age-appropriate story books – in every classroom so that learners have access to these books.”Since its establishment, Read to Rise has visited children in more than 350 classrooms, handing out in excess of 2 800 books to pupils in Soweto and Mitchells Plain.Read to Rise has been working with youth from under-resourced communities such as Mitchell Plain and its surrounding areas near Cape Town.BOOKS IN THE NEW AGESpeaking on the role that books have in the age of tablets and smart phones, Lock says “books play a huge part in today’s age especially in the under-resourced, crime-ridden communities that we work with.“There is something special about holding a new book in your hands, turning the pages and reading it. Book ownership is important as it creates a sense of pride, responsibility and an enjoyment of reading. That’s exactly why we give a brand new, high quality book to every child.”PLAY YOUR PARTIf you’re looking to help the Read to Rise organisation you can visit their website at www.readtorise.co.za or email them at info@readtorise.co.za.“Individuals can volunteer their time to read to children at schools, cover books in plastic at one of our “Cover & Coffee” sessions or offer their expertise to assist with our operations.” Lock explains.“Individuals or corporates can sponsor new books. It costs R45 to sponsor a new book for a learner or R3,200 to sponsor a Mini-Library for a class.”last_img read more

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It’s Time to Plan for Electric Vehicles on the Grid

first_imgPrograms and incentives drive booming market growthIn the U.S., a variety of state and federal tax incentives, other local benefits, and deployment targets are supporting double-digit growth rates in EV adoption and charging-station installation:California aims to have 1.5 million EVs on the road by 2025 — a more than 600% increase over the roughly 200,000 EVs it has today — along with the supporting charging infrastructure. And the three big investor-owned utilities in California are developing programs to radically increase the number of charging stations available in their territories, under a variety of innovative programs.Nine states have followed suit on California’s Zero Emissions Vehicles program, which sets goals for manufacturers to sell EVs. Several states have begun to transition their fleets of state vehicles over to EVs.The Drive Clean Seattle program aims to increase EV adoption by 400% and get 15,000 EVs on the road in the city by 2025, as well as to triple the number of publicly available fast chargers.The City of Indianapolis intends to replace its entire gasoline-powered fleet with EVs by 2025. The City of Houston now has one-quarter of its fleet plugged in. New York City plans to create the largest municipal electric vehicle fleet in the country.Group purchase programs in Colorado for Nissan Leafs quadrupled sales in Boulder, and increased sales by a factor of six in northern Colorado.So, although EVs are a small part of the fleet (0.16%) and of new vehicle sales (0.7%) in the U.S. now, watch out: Their adoption could follow the path of other disruptive technologies, like cell phones and internet access, and become ubiquitous in an astonishingly short time.This is particularly likely as the world begins making real strides toward its climate change targets. Bloomberg New Energy Finance estimates that electric vehicles could account for 35% of all new vehicle sales worldwide by 2040, as the price of long-range EVs falls to less than $22,000 and drivers begin to appreciate how much cheaper they are to drive than internal combustion vehicles. BY CHRIS NELDERIf you think electric vehicles are still a niche technology, think again. The International Energy Agency (IEA) estimates that more than 1 million electric vehicles (EVs) were on the road in 2015, including 400,000 in the United States. In order to limit global warming to 2 C° or less, the agency says the world will need 150 million EVs by 2030 and 1 billion by 2050, implying a 21% compound annual growth rate from now until 2050.India is considering a state-financed plan that would let drivers buy EVs for zero money down, then pay for the vehicles out of gasoline savings. The plan aims to transition India’s entire fleet to electric vehicles by 2030.China also is aiming to have a fully electrified fleet, eventually, and has a target of putting 5 million battery-electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles on the road by 2020. EV sales there quadrupled to more than 247,000 last year, more than double the 115,000 sold in the U.S.EVs already have a larger market share in Norway, at 17%, than anywhere else in the world, and although the country is not banning the sale of gasoline and diesel vehicles, as recent reports suggested, it is formulating targets for zero-emission vehicles in order to reach climate goals. RELATED ARTICLES How will your decisions help or hamper the grid of the future?But the EV revolution will need more than utilities and regulators to support it; many of us have important roles to play. A new report from RMI’s Electricity Innovation Lab (eLab), Electric Vehicles as Distributed Energy Resources, developed in conjunction with the Regulatory Assistance Project and San Diego Gas and Electric, identifies best practices for elected officials, vehicle manufacturers, regulators, utilities, and other stakeholders, as well as important considerations for consumers and consumer advocates.Among other things, we have to ensure that charging stations are installed and available at the right time and place for drivers to use them. But what that means may vary by state and utility grid. We have to ensure that EVs are affordable and practical for the broadest possible cross section of drivers, as a matter of social equity. And we need to influence, with increasing precision, where and when EVs are charged through a combination of partnerships, incentives, and market structures. In its early stages, the interesting challenges and opportunities related to vehicle grid integration will be local or even hyperlocal, at the scales where grid-related issues will first emerge.By working together and managing EV charging so that it happens at the right times and places, EVs can be integrated into the electricity system in ways that deliver net benefits to utility customers, shareholders, vehicle owners, and society at large. EVs currently have a 10% market share in the Netherlands, which is discussing the possibility of banning the sale of gasoline vehicles and only allowing EV sales by 2025. Can We Power Our Car With the Sun?How Green Is Your Car? As Electric Cars Stall, A Move to Greener Trucks and BusesWill Self-Driving Cars Save Energy?The Downside of Low Gas PricesElectric Vehicles Hit a Pothole in CaliforniaNew Life for Old Electric Vehicle BatteriesPlan for California Vehicle Charging Stations on HoldMinnesota OKs Special Rates for Electric VehiclesAn Indiana Utility Offers Free Car ChargesA Charger in Every GarageMore Tips for Improving MileageHouses Versus CarsUsing Parked Electric Cars For Peak ShavingRunning Our House on Prius Power Utilities: Be preparedIf utilities and their regulators are not prepared for such a rapid expansion of the EV fleet, it could have negative effects on the grid. The life of grid infrastructure components could be shortened and greater investment in peak capacity could be required, making the grid less efficient, increasing the unit costs of electricity for all consumers, inhibiting the integration of renewables, increasing grid power emissions, and making the grid less stable.But if utilities and regulators anticipate rapid EV growth and plan accordingly by implementing the right incentives and tariff structures, EVs could become an incredibly valuable grid asset, and actually reduce the cost of electricity by helping to optimize the grid so that it operates more efficiently.EVs can enable the growth of wind and solar on the grid by absorbing their output when it is greatest, helping utilities avoid new investment in grid infrastructure, reducing electricity and transportation costs, reducing petroleum consumption and emissions, improving energy security, and supplying ancillary services to the grid, such as frequency regulation and power factor correction.Utilities should prepare for a rapid adoption of EVs for another reason: avoiding undue stress on the electricity distribution network. EVs with high-capacity batteries, such as the 30 kWh 2016 Nissan Leaf, can consume as much electricity as the average U.S. residence consumes in a day. In order to avoid overloading distribution grid components, utilities will need to either invest in expensive grid upgrades or offer electricity rate structures that encourage vehicle owners to recharge their vehicles when grid power demand is low. Managing charging patterns is already important for neighborhoods with more than three or four EVs in places such as San Diego and Silicon Valley. Chris Nelder is a manager with the Rocky Mountain Institute’s electricity practice. This post originally appeared at the RMI Outlet.last_img read more

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