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Professor explores Notre Dame’s St. Patrick’s Day history

first_imgSt. Patrick’s Day carries many different meanings. For the Irish, it is the Catholic feast day of Ireland’s patron saint and a day for honoring Irish heritage. For Irish-Americans, St. Patrick’s Day has become a celebration of Irish-American identity. And at Notre Dame — a school with the Irish leprechaun as a mascot — St. Patrick’s Day holds special significance, although spring break sometimes keeps students off campus on the holiday.Deborah Rotman, an anthropology professor and director of Notre Dame’s Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE), has conducted research on the Irish-immigrant experience in the U.S. and in South Bend.“The history of Notre Dame and St. Patrick’s Day actually goes back to our founding as an institution,” Rotman said.Although Fr. Edward Sorin was French, four of the seven monks who founded the University were Irishmen. In the midst of building the Notre Dame campus in 1842, Sorin had to address growing anti-immigrant sentiment toward Irish immigrants in the South Bend community. As a result, Rotman said Sorin made a point to integrate the Irish into the Notre Dame Catholic community. He established Sorinsville, a residential neighborhood around campus where the Irish-Catholic immigrants would reside together. Although Rotman said this strategy separated the immigrants from the community, she said Sorin wanted to help the immigrants integrate.“Sorinsville may seem like a form of residential segregation, but Fr. Sorin’s intent was to stabilize the workforce for the University and help these immigrants create new lives for themselves in South Bend,” she said.Despite his work with the Irish, Sorin banned the celebration of St. Patrick’s Day at Notre Dame, a decision that was justified for security reasons, Rotman said.“Most people do not know that Sorin’s decision to forbid celebration on St. Patrick’s Day was grounded in his belief that the anti-immigrant sentiment of the time was a public-safety issue,” she said. “In other words, Sorin was not trying to scorn the Irish or evade a day of festivities; he was really just trying to to protect the Notre Dame community from potential social conflict.”By the time of Sorin’s death, Rotman said the negative sentiment toward Irish-Catholics “shifted” to other immigrant groups, and Americans began to embrace the Irish much more. As a result, St. Patrick’s Day at Notre Dame involved a variety of activities. Every year, a Mass commemorated the feast of St. Patrick, the band played Irish sacred music in front of the Dome and students recited Irish poems to one another for entertainment. Classes were cancelled for University-wide concerts, banquets, football games, plays and parades.By the early 2000s, Notre Dame students had established a variety of festive traditions for St. Patrick’s Day. Some students attended the feast day Mass which features Notre Dame Folk Choir’s collection of Irish sacred music. Students dressed for class in green garb and make-shift “bands” paraded through academic buildings playing the bagpipes. Many of the dorms on campus hosted cookouts or gave out Irish paraphernalia, and the dining halls offered Irish cuisine in the form of potato dishes and cabbage.This year marked another year of a spring break St. Patrick’s Day. In fact, there have only been a handful of years in which St. Patrick’s Day has actually taken place when students were on-campus. Rotman dispelled the notion that the administration manipulates the dates of spring break to prevent a rowdy, on-campus celebration of the holiday. She noted that by rule spring break must begin the Saturday after the 39th class day.“I do not believe the administration purposely schedules spring break to avoid St. Patrick’s Day,” Rotman said. “I think the scheduling ultimately comes down to the timing of Christmas and Easter break, and they have to follow the registrar’s spring semester calendar rules, too.”Tags: Father Sorin, Heritage, immigrants, Notre Dame history, Saint Patrick’s Daylast_img read more

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Tickets Now Available for Revolution in the Elbow of Ragnar Agnarsson Furniture Painter

first_img Based on a story by Ívar and Gunnlaugur Jónsson, Revolution in the Elbow of Ragnar Agnarsson Furniture Painter answers the hypothetical question, “have you ever wondered what’s going on inside your elbow?” The emotionally charged rock love story explores a love triangle set in Elbowville, a small community within Ragnar Agnarsson’s body. Elbowville mayor Manuela (Huffman) must deal with a crisis when a “prosperity machine” compromises the peace of the sweet little community. Huffman won a Tony for her performance in The Producers; her additional Broadway credits include The Nance, Steel Pier and La Cage aux Folles. Shindle most recently appeared on Broadway in Wonderland, and has also starred in Legally Blonde, Cabaret and Jekyll & Hyde. In addition to Huffman and Shindle, the cast includes Michael Biren, Patrick Boll, Zach Cossman, Karli Dinardo, Danielle Kelsey, Graydon Long, Brad Nacht, Josh Sassanella, Marrick Smith and Jesse Wildman. Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 20, 2014 Revolution in the Elbow of Ragnar Agnarsson Furniture Painter View Commentscenter_img Tickets are now on sale for the world premiere of Revolution in the Elbow of Ragnar Agnarsson Furniture Painter, a new musical starring Tony winner Cady Huffman and Kate Shindle. Directed by Bergur Þór Ingólfsson, the tuner, which features a book, music and lyrics by Ívar Páll Jónsson, begins performances on July 28 at the Minetta Lane Theatre. Opening night is set for August 13. Revolution in the Elbow will feature choreography by Lee Proud, set and projection design by Petr Hloušek, lighting design by Jeff Croiter and Cory Pattak, sound design by Carl Casella and costumes by Hrafnhildur Arnardottir. Related Showslast_img read more

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Griswold Purchases Ready Mix Company Assets

first_imgGriswold and Company is pleased to announce the purcahse of the assets of Acro Redimix, located in Waterford, VT. With five ready mix locations, Griswold and Company now services the ready mix needs of Northern Vermont.Griswold and Company, though associated mainly with ready mix concrete, does concrete form work and produces a variety of concrete products including pavers, block, pipe, steps, manholes, septic tanks, architectural precast, and Sakrete for home and commercial use.last_img

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U.S. Cuts 2016 Coal Production Outlook

first_imgU.S. Cuts 2016 Coal Production Outlook FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Molly Christian for SNL:The U.S. government cut its coal production outlook for 2016 as the year began with the lowest monthly production total since July 1983.The U.S. Energy Information Administration estimates that domestic coal production totaled 59 million tons in January, a 7% decline versus the prior month. The government agency expects that U.S. coal production will total 834 million tons in 2016, a 2.2% decline versus the prior outlook and a 6.4% decline versus the prior-year total of 890 million tons. For 2017, the EIA expects that coal production will rise 0.9% to 841 million tons, a 0.3% decline versus the prior outlook.The government agency expects the Interior region to account for 20% of domestic production in 2016 and 2017, up from 13% of production a decade ago, as production declines at a slower rate than that of the Appalachian and Western regions.“This increase in share reflects the [Interior] region’s growing competitive advantages compared with other U.S. coal-producing regions, [including] higher heat content, closer proximity to major markets than Western region coal, and lower mining costs than Appalachia-produced coal,” the report said.Meanwhile, the EIA expects power-sector coal demand will remain flat as increased demand resulting from rising natural gas prices is offset by growing renewables penetration of the power market and coal plant retirements. The government agency projects that power-sector coal demand will slide 0.1% to 746 million tons in 2016, a 0.9% decline versus the prior outlook, before recovering 0.5% in 2017 to 750 million tons, up 0.9% versus the prior outlook.Full articlee ($): US government trims coal production outlook, projects demand to remain flatlast_img read more

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D’Addario & Co. Guitar String Maker Humming Along

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A century ago, an immigrant who settled in Astoria set up a tiny, home-based guitar string manufacturing shop, continuing a family tradition that he brought with him from the Italian countryside.That immigrant, Charles D’Addario, passed along the family trade to his children and grandchildren, who set up a larger manufacturing facility in Lynbrook with five employees four decades ago. Nowadays, D’Addario & Co. has an almost 200,000-square-foot facility in Farmingdale that employs nearly 1,000 workers, making it the world’s largest musical instrument accessory manufacturer. It recently opened a European division, effectively coming full circle.“We are very excited by the creation of D’Addario Europe and we look forward to advancing our brands in these extremely vital markets,” says John D’Addario, III, president of D’Addario & Company, Inc. “Our family began string making in Europe, so it is personally meaningful to return to Europe with the promise of building more direct relationships with this historic and vibrant music community.”Musicians who use their strings read like a who’s who of big-name acts: Keith Urban, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Zac Brown, and many more. Part of D’Addario’s success is its worldwide distribution and dealer networks. The company products are marketed in the United States through wholesale distribution and more than 5,400 retail music stores. Their products are sold in 101 countries worldwide.John Jr. and James D’Addario have taken great steps to pass down the family tradition. The family-owned company’s roots date back to the 17th century, originating in the small Italian town of Salle. The family traces their start in the craft back eight generations. A baptismal form filled out by their ancestor, Donato D’Addario, listed his occupation as cordaro, which is Italian for string maker.Centuries later, John D’Addario is still keeping the family business in tune.last_img read more

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5 marketing trends for 2015

first_imgAre you prepared for the marketing trends of 2015? The Credit Union Times reported five marketing trends for 2015 last week and as a DigitalMailer client we wanted to let you know how you can utilize our tools to make sure your financial institution is a trend-setter.The article, which can be seen here, noted the five trends we will see this year are:Digital Advertising DominatesMaking Digital InvestmentsPredicting What Members WantMaking it Real with Video MarketingThe Latino Market Is CallingWe’ll break down the facts, the predictions and how you can prepare as a client of DigitalMailer.1. Digital Advertising DominatesAccording to the article, credit union marketing professionals expect to see credit unions shift more dollars from traditional advertising to digital advertising.A Gartner survey showed that digital advertising spending averaged about 25 percent of a company’s marketing budget last year, but around half of those companies plan to increase their digital marketing budget by 17% on average in 2015. continue reading » 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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ACUC, World Council millennial focus grabs Denver media attention

first_img 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr The Denver Business Journal took a look at credit unions and their aspiration to be millennials’ primary financial institutions just weeks before global credit union advocates arrive in Denver for America’s Credit Union Conference and World Credit Union Conference.“A critical segment of the population for credit unions to reach is, of course, millennials,” Scott Earl, Mountain West Credit Union Association (MWCUA) president/CEO, told the Journal (June 12). “Our research tells us that within two years, they will wield more purchasing power than any other generation.”Millennials are expected to surpass baby boomers as the largest living generational group in the United States.“It is vitally important for credit unions to first reach those potential members, and then communicate a relevant message that will make them consider a credit union as their financial institution of choice,” Earl said. continue reading »last_img read more

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If your 2018 goals include revenue and loan growth you are not alone

first_imgGiven that it is late December I will hazard to guess that most credit unions have inked a strategic plan and if the 2018 operating plan and budget is not already approved it likely will be very soon. I will even go out on a limb and project that many, if not most, in Credit Union Land have aspirations for revenue growth in 2018.Callahan & Associates’ Peer-to-Peer software provides some insights into the credit union revenue dynamic. On average, loans constituted 70% of credit union assets and directly contributed 63% of total income generated by credit unions in Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas in the third quarter of 2017. “Other” operating income, which is frequently derived from loan-related activities, accounted for 12.8% of income. Adding the two together one might say that lending directly or indirectly contributes over 70% of credit union income.Rounding out the categories, fees are the second largest single source of income at 17.2% of the regional total. Investments, which constitute 17% of credit union assets, generate 7% of total income.Depending upon your credit union’s loans-to-assets ratio your income composition may not look like the averages, which are admittedly influenced heavily by large credit unions. And credit union profitability is generally higher among credit unions with healthy loans-to-asset positions. So, if you are looking for revenue enhancement and your loan mix is not where it needs to be, a likely candidate for revenue enhancement may be loan growth. continue reading » 11SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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NAFCU publishes FAQ on ADA to help CUs targeted by lawsuits

first_img continue reading » NAFCU published a new FAQ document to help association members and nonmembers with concerns about the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and website accessibility. The document explains why credit unions are being targeted with legal action and what NAFCU is doing to help, among other useful information.Credit unions can download the FAQ from a message sent by NAFCU President and CEO Dan Berger yesterday or by clicking here.The document includes questions and answers on strategic options under consideration, which credit unions are being targeted by plaintiffs’ attorneys and how credit unions are responding to demand letters regarding their website compliance with the ADA.NAFCU has myriad resources available online that can help credit unions better understand and manage recent litigation risk related to the ADA. Last week, Berger provided an update to members on NAFCU’s efforts thus far to put an end to meritless lawsuits concerning website accessibility under the ADA, obtain clear guidance on the issue and help those credit unions currently facing litigation. 9SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Generational relativity & payments preferences

first_imgWhen it comes to innovation and implementing change, credit unions have many things to consider, including cost to implement, deployment strategy, security and compliance, and employee and member onboarding—among other things.For many organizations, generational preferences are the driving force behind improvements and innovation, propelling credit unions and their partners to remain focused on staying one step ahead of technology and consumer trends.One thing that the data does agree on is that all consumers, regardless of age, are starting to migrate from traditional payment methods, opting for digital payments. For financial institutions competing with fintech disrupters, inertia is not an option—they must innovate to meet the payment preferences across the generational divide. In this article, we’ll take a look at recent industry trends and evaluate the payment preferences of the different generations to help your credit union develop the best strategy for improving every member’s experience. Baby Boomers (1944-1964)Born in droves in the years after World War II, baby boomers are currently in their mid-fifties to mid-seventies. Although it is a common industry misconception that the younger generations are forcing financial institutions and payment acceptance providers to innovate, provide cashless only options, and remove all friction from the buying process, baby boomers are actually just as put-off by inconvenience when it comes to making payments as their millennial and Gen X counterparts. Debit has evolved from being a youth-focused payment method to being the payment option of choice for 171 million U.S. consumers,1 becoming the number one most-used payment method across nearly all age segments. In fact, 77% of baby boomers use debit and credit cards.2 For credit unions, options are key when it comes to debit card payments. Giving all of your account holders, regardless of generational affiliation, options that include different reward programs, fee structures, and cashback options could be the difference between deeper wallet share—or a one-and-done borrower.Gen X (1965-1980)Born between 1965 and 1979, Gen Xers lived through the end of the Cold War and Watergate. Gen Xers have the highest total debt of all age groups, and only 42% of them pay off their credit card balances each month.3Overall household credit card debt has steadily risen over the last five years, sitting at $1.3 trillion more (in nominal terms) than the previous peak in 3Q 2008.4 So, while credit cards cannot be used on loan payments, in most cases, credit cards are very much a part of the daily purchasing habits of many U.S. consumers.Millennials (1980-1995)Everyone knows that millennials are digital natives, but simply having an online banking site doesn’t mean you’re providing all the convenience millennials seek. You have to optimize your website and online banking portal for how millennials use them.Although millennials are thought of as one group, there are actually two distinct subgroups that make up this demographic:Older Millennials (1980-1988)Younger Millennials (1989-1995) Having grown up with the internet, both older and younger millennial consumers expect easy access to information—when they want it, where they want it, and in whatever channel they choose. They hold a high comfort level when using mobile devices as part of a multichannel experience and are using mobile to connect the online and offline worlds. Although the emerging omni-channel consumer is typically a younger person, there is a growing amount of overlap for this preference, even among baby boomers and members of Gen X. There are pockets of older consumers—primarily technology-savvy segments—that share the enthusiasm for mobile payments but also have strong cross-channel behaviors. In other words, just because mobile is a preferred method of payment for millennial consumers, convenience is still at the top of everyone’s list, and it’s important not to lose sight of other payment channels like online, IVR (Interactive Voice Response), cash (ex: MoneyGram), and customer service representative (CSR)-assisted.With more options than ever, today’s consumers want their payments experience to be fast, easy, and secure, with the latest and greatest technology. Providing a frictionless and diverse payment experience that is effective across the generational divide can help credit unions thrive in a competitive financial services landscape. The path forward will require a thorough understanding of your customer base, generational preferences, and trending payment technology.To learn more about how payment preferences differ across generations, download our ebook, Equal and Opposite Reactions: Payment Preferences Across the Generational Divide. Sources:1 Simmons National Consumer Study, Fall, 2017.2 https://www.pscu.com/eye-on-payments3 https://www.business.com/articles/kristen-gramigna-customer-payments/4 https://www.newyorkfed.org/medialibrary/interactives/householdcredit/data/pdf/hhdc_2019q3.pdf 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Ali Masoudi A pragmatic, Ivy League educated and a recipient of Feigenbaum Medal presented by American Society for Quality (ASQ), Ali is an experienced product manager with 10+ years proven track record … Web: https://www.swbc.com Detailslast_img read more

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