Category: jhzpoienkmlo

Doctoral student researches history of Catholicism, American liberalism at Vatican archives

first_imgBetween study sessions, doctoral candidate Susanna De Stradis takes breaks at a small, private courtyard cafe of the Vatican Apostolic Archive to drink coffee, meet other scholars and “zoom back to the present day.”De Stradis recently started conducting research into the Vatican’s archives for her dissertation during her third year as a doctoral student of history at Notre Dame. Her investigation explores the relationship between Catholicism and principles of American liberalism like religious freedom and the separation of church and state.Her studies focus primarily on Vatican perspectives on post-war Catholicism in the United States, that is, between the end of World War II and the Second Vatican Council.During that time, the Church is learning to deal with American democracy through a closer, geopolitical relation with the United States, De Stradis said.“But also, the United States is rethinking the terms of its own First Amendment and what it implies, both in the courts, but also in Congress,” De Stradis said.The archives open at 8:30 a.m. every day. Whenever she goes to the Vatican, De Stradis arrives at the Porta Sant’Anna around 9 or 9:30 a.m. and shows her entrance badge to the Swiss guards. Then, she passes through a metal detector and heads to the archive; before entering, she leaves her belongings in a locker — even her phone.“It’s not a normal Hesburgh Library-type thing, obviously,” she said.There is no signal inside the Vatican Archive and no photos are allowed, anyway. “This slows the process quite a bit,” De Stradis added, “but it also forces you to really think critically about what you’re seeing on the spot.”Her research is being funded by a Peter R. D’Agostino research travel grant through the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism and the Center for Italian Studies, as well as by a “Religion, Spirituality and Democratic Renewal” fellowship from the Social Science Research Council.De Stradis initially became interested in the historical tensions between the United States and Catholicism when she studied history as an undergraduate student at the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa and as a Master of Arts student at the University of Pisa.“As I started to delve deeper into this kind of history, I realized there had been frictions between the Vatican and the United States, something that I was not necessarily aware of before I entered college,” she said.She called her particular interest an “exotic topic to pursue” in Italy, but not so much in the United States where she was told even sociologists, political scientists and lawyers would be interested in the questions she wanted to ask.“I was interested in the history of American Catholicism, so Notre Dame is pretty much the best place in the world to pursue this kind of studies,” De Stradis said.In fact, she said, a book that drew her to this research topic was “Catholicism and American Freedom: A History” by John McGreevy, professor of history and De Stradis’ mentor and dissertation adviser at Notre Dame.“I lived in South Bend for three years, and now the time has come to finally go do some research — or should I say come do some research — over here, in Rome,” she said.De Stradis is originally from Apulia, the “heel of the [Italian] boot,” but she said she had not been feeling homesick before returning to her country.“I can’t say that I’ve missed Italy while I was in South Bend,” she said. “I really loved the U.S. … But Rome is sort of exceptional.” Courtesy of Susanna De Stradis Originally from Italy, Notre Dame doctoral candidate Susanna De Stradis arrived in Rome Sept. 14 to study the Vatican archives.De Stradis said her plans fell into place, time-wise, since Pope Francis opened in March 2020 the archives of Pope Pius XII’s papacy — which lasted from 1939 to 1958, when World War II took place.For doctoral students, De Stradis said, their academic credentials and a letter of recommendation are often enough to apply for and gain access to the archives.“I don’t know of anyone who has applied and has been rejected for obscure reasons,” she added.De Stradis said most documents that can be accessed through the Vatican Archive were produced or received by the central organs of the Roman Curia — the different branches of the Vatican’s central bureaucracy. Of particular interest to her, though, was the collection of the Apostolic Nunciature of the Holy See to the United States.“Every kind of communication between the American Catholic hierarchy and the Vatican had to go through the Apostolic delegate,” she said. “Since I want to look at Rome’s attitude towards mainly domestic developments in the U.S., this is the place to look at.”But the archives are not as well sorted as she expected, so “you have to rely a lot on the goodwill of the personnel there,” De Stradis said. She, for one, has been collaborating with an archivist to overcome these hurdles.“He’s basically bringing folders to me that I wouldn’t otherwise be able to locate and ask [for] through the normal system,” she said.Due to COVID-19 health and safety precautions, the archives can accommodate only 25 scholars every day in a room that would normally accommodate 60, De Stradis said. But the effects of the pandemic can be seen outside of Vatican City and throughout Rome, as well.“The city is empty,” De Stradis said. There are few tourists — particularly, very few Americans — and the subway is not crowded.She said she expects her research at the Vatican and her stay in Rome will last for at least seven months.“I do realize that I’m in a very uniquely privileged position as an Italian [and] as a graduate student who’s still able to go to the archives,” she said.De Stradis arrived in Italy on Sept. 14.“Which is exactly the date I had planned to be here, so this is not COVID-related, it’s just as planned,” she said. “Again — I feel very blessed.”Tags: American Catholicism, Rome, Vatican Archivelast_img read more

Read More

London Datebook: Buyer & Cellar, Gypsy & More

first_img View Comments The play for once really is the thing in a London month that puts musicals on the back burner for a change—well, that is until Gypsy begins previews—and lets the plays take center stage instead. The talent involved includes Americans and Brits, Tony winners and nominees, and well-known TV names. For more on an ever-eclectic London line-up, read on.MARCH 9-15Teale Time: Those who saw it are unlikely to forget the 1997 Broadway revival of A Doll’s House that won Tony Awards for stars Janet McTeer and Owen Teale. The strapping Teale is back on the London stage starting March 12 in a rare sighting of the Jacobean tragedy, The Broken Heart, at the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse at Shakespeare’s Globe. Caroline Steinbeis directs a cast that includes Amy Morgan from TV’s Mr. Selfridge.ALSO: The 2015 Olivier Award nominees are announced March 9, so check back to see if your favorite play or player has made the cut. Di and Viv and Rose plays its final performance at the Vaudeville Theatre March 14, with a cast including Samantha Spiro and Jenna Russell; the Southwark Playhouse revival of Paula Vogel’s How I Learned to Drive, with Olivia Poulet, also concludes its run March 14.MARCH 16-22Funny Guy: Ugly Betty star and New York theater regular Michael Urie brings his hugely acclaimed solo performance in the Jonathan Tolins play Buyer & Cellar to the Menier Chocolate Factory, opening March 19. The play, revolving around its hero’s singular obsession with Barbra Streisand, is coming to the capital where Tolins’s earlier The Twilight of the Golds was seen in 1997 with none other than Streisand’s son, Jason Gould, heading the cast.ALSO: Broadway veteran Zoe Wanamaker opens March 16 at the Hampstead Theatre in Stevie, playing the English poet Stevie Smith in a revival of the 1977 Hugh Whitemore play that also stars Chris Larkin, one of the two actor-sons of the great Maggie Smith. Mel Brooks takes to the Prince of Wales Theatre for a one-night-only solo show on March 22—a rare opportunity to see the legendary funnyman, now 88, in action.MARCH 23-29Learning the Rules: Marianne Elliott seems to strike gold with every production she directs at the National Theatre, as War Horse and The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time have proven. So all eyes will be on her latest venture, Rules for Living by Sam Holcroft, opening March 24 in the Dorfman auditorium. Tony nominee Stephen Mangan (The Norman Conquests) heads the cast.ALSO: Staying with the National, Nicholas Hytner looks back on his distinguished tenure running this address in an early-evening Q&A on March 27, within days of handing over the artistic directorship of the building to Rufus Norris. Mary Chase’s perennial comic favorite Harvey opens at the Haymarket on March 23 with James Dreyfus (The Producers) playing the bunny-loving Elwood P. Dowd.MARCH 30–APRIL 5Phys(ics) Ed: The so-called “father of the atomic bomb,” the American theoretical physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer, gives his name to Tom Morton-Smith’s acclaimed Royal Shakespeare Company play, Oppenheimer, transferring from Stratford-upon-Avon for a London run that opens March 31 at the Vaudeville and with the wonderful John Heffernan in the title role. Angus Jackson, whose credits include the Frank Langella King Lear on both sides of the Atlantic, directs.ALSO: More than 40 years after Angela Lansbury played Momma Rose in London, Gypsy finally gets another West End revival, with performances starting March 28 at the Savoy Theatre. Imelda Staunton repeats her triumphant Chichester Festival take on this most legendary of stage mothers, with Sherlock’s Lara Pulver in the title role and Peter Davison joining the cast to play Herbie.last_img read more

Read More

Errata

first_img July 1, 2003 Errata A June 1 story about HIPAA erroneously reported that lawyer Elizabeth F. Hodge represents an Orlando hospital, when in fact her firm represents an Ocala hospital.Also, Mark Eiglarsh’s name was misspelled in the June 1 News and Notes section. Erratalast_img

Read More

Governor Wolf, Senator Yudichak, & Rep. Pashinski Announce $125,000 in State Funds for Solomon Creek Flood Wall

first_img Press Release,  Weather Safety Harrisburg, PA – Today, Governor Wolf, Senator John Yudichak, and Representative Eddie Day Pashinski announced that the state would commit $125,000 for a temporary fix to the Solomon Creek flood wall in Wilkes-Barre to try to prevent further erosion until a full repair can be made.“I am glad the state is able to support the temporary fix to the Solomon Creek flood wall,” said Governor Tom Wolf. “My administration will continue to monitor this situation closely and work with local and federal officials for a long-term solution to this serious issue. I want to sincerely thank Senator Yudichak, Representative Pashinski and Mayor George for their swift response and commitment to ensuring the safety of Wilkes-Barre’s citizens.”In the evening of December 9, 2016, approximately 40 feet of the Solomon Creek flood wall along Brook Street collapsed.  The immediate short term solution consists of repairing the failure location with a moment slab style wall for a distance of approximately 48’ between existing wall construction joints. This will eliminate the risk of more of the wall collapsing.“Mayor George has worked non-stop to find funding to repair the damaged Solomon Creek flood wall, and with the Governor’s release of $125,000 in state funds, we are one big step closer to addressing the long-standing problems related to Solomon Creek,” said State Senator Yudichak.“I would like to sincerely thank Gov. Wolf for his commitment to assist Sen. Yudichak and me to secure much needed funding for the Solomon Creek emergency,” said Rep. Eddie Day Pashinski. “I am pleased to announce the Gov. along with the House and Senate Appropriations staff have released $125,000 to jump start the construction necessary to protect the residents and businesses in the South Wilkes-Barre area.”Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf Governor Wolf, Senator Yudichak, & Rep. Pashinski Announce $125,000 in State Funds for Solomon Creek Flood Wall December 22, 2016center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Read More

Outdoor play helps steer kids away from being couch potatoes

first_imgProvidence Parklands at South RipleyA residential masterplanned community at South Ripley is the first in Queensland aiming to get more children off the couch and involved in outdoor activities.The partnership between Providence South Ripley and Nature Play Queensland will help shape the community into a place for children to play freely outdoors.A community Playbourhood Day was held last month where local children enjoyed outdoor games and cubby house building.Providence is the largest masterplanned community in the Ripley Valley with nearly 700 families now calling the estate home.Nature Play Queensland’s mission is to increase the time children spend in unstructured play outdoors and in nature. It is founded on the understanding that unstructured play outdoors – nature play – is fundamental to a full and healthy childhood.Nature play promotes a range of health benefits, including cognitive, social and emotional development, and builds resilience and creativity. More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus14 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market14 hours agoProvidence project director Michael Khan said: “Providence has always been about families and one of the things we hear from our community is around the challenges of getting kids out of the house to enjoy the outdoors”.“We have amazing parks, paths and playgrounds but need to do more to teach children about the value of unstructured, outdoor play,” he said.Meanwhile Stockland’s Pallara community has started two new activity groups for kids as well as parents and babies.The nationwide Ready Steady Go Kids program at Pallara’s Central Park teaches children the fundamentals of 10 sports and has been designed to develop motor skills in a fun, non-competitive environment.Stockland residential communities Queensland general manager David Laner said the new groups offered wonderful opportunities for residents and children to get to know each other and improve their fitness. Nature Play Queensland program manager Hyahno Moser said the partnership was an important step toward prioritising the health and wellbeing of children in their neighbourhoods.“Encouraging outdoor play is aided by maximising open and community places and spaces for playing and connecting, and designing streets that are safer for children by reducing speeding,” Mr Moser said.Ensuring residential areas are connected to community facilities such as parks, schools and shops encourages walking.last_img read more

Read More

The Gold Coast’s best suburbs to buy an investment property

first_imgLeading the top 100 list was country town Blackwater in the Central Highlands Region, which had a gross rental return of 11.7 per cent. “Median house values ranged from $89,483 to $521,597 and for units between $133,205 and $395,577,” the report read. “(It) featured 63 suburbs where houses represent good rental opportunities and 37 suburbs where units offer the highest yields, while also demonstrating positive rental growth.” The other states lagged behind Queensland’s impressive rental performance, with only 17 suburbs making it to the list in New South Wales, 15 in South Australia and Victoria, eight in Tasmania and one in Western Australia, Northern Territory and Australian Capital Territory. MORE NEWS: Mansion listed with eye-watering price A total of 42 Queensland ’burbs graced the CoreLogic list.CoreLogic research analyst Cameron Kusher said to make the cut, the suburb had to have delivered “solid rental yields, consistent rental growth and vacancy rates of less than 3 per cent”.He added finding a positively geared investment was more likely in the top 100 areas. All seven Gold Coast suburbs featured on the list for their unit’s performance, with Reedy Creek leading the pack for the city at No. 51. The suburb’s units had a gross rental yield of 6.8 per cent per annum, a median rent of $430 per week and a median sales price of $350,000. Southport units followed at No. 79 thanks to a gross yield of 6.5 per cent, median rent of $390 per week and median sales price of $375,000. Labrador was ranked 80 followed by Upper Coomera (83), Mudgeeraba (92), Currumbin Waters (95) and Helensvale (97). Reedy Creek was home to the Gold Coast’s best performing investment units.Harcourts Coastal agent Katrina Keegan said the Gold Coast’s expansion of public transport was shinning the spotlight on suburbs further out of the CBD. “Main Beach would usually take the accolade but the public transport expansion is sharing it around,” she said. “The apartment sector has gone up because the light rail and extensions of the train stations are pushing people further out.”Ms Keegan said interstate investors and buyers looking for a sea-change were also bolstering the unit market. More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa10 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag1 day ago“In 2019, we have definitely seen an increase in interstate investors across the board,” she said.“The biggest numbers have come out of New South Wales.” Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:46Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:46 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenChoosing an apartment to invest in01:47 Seven Gold Coast suburbs made the list of Australia’s best 100 areas for rental performance.QUEENSLAND has dominated a list of 100 best places in the country for rental performance, with seven Gold Coast suburbs taking out top honours. The latest CoreLogic report, which ranks rental yield figures, saw Reedy Creek, Southport, Labrador, Upper Coomera, Mudgeeraba, Currumbin Waters and Helensvale as investor hot spots. The Glitter Strip ’burbs joined 35 other areas in the Sunshine State in the nationwide list that was made up of suburbs with an estimated gross rental yield of 5 per cent or more a year for either houses or units. MORE NEWS: House with theme park backyard sells in million-dollar deal mikaela.day@news.com.aulast_img read more

Read More

Premier League clubs plot to beat Sevilla to Ligue 1 target

first_imgJulen Lopetegui’s side were linked with the midfielder during the January transfer window, after having an €8M bid rejected last summer.However, due to the ongoing suspension of football during the Covid 19 lock down, reports from Marca claim Marseille will lower their asking price.Lopez is rated at €15M by the Ligue 1 club, however, as he moves into the final year of his contract, that could drop to €8M. Promoted Content10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?You’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of Anime7 Of The Wealthiest Universities In The WorldEver Thought Of Sleeping Next To Celebs? This Guy Will Show You2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This Year10 Stargazing Locations To ‘Connect With Nature’Couples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way7 Worst Things To Do To Your PhoneFantastic-Looking (and Probably Delicious) Bread Art7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better13 kids at weddings who just don’t give a hoot Read Also: Lionel Messi is above Ronaldo, CR7, Ronaldinho – XaviBut despite being the front runner to sign him this summer, the report also claims Sevilla will now be challenged by Aston Villa, West Ham and Tottenham.Villa are only likely to make a move if they remain in the Premier League for the 2020-21 campaign, but the other two sides could be genuine challengers to Lopetegui in the coming months.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Sevilla will be pressured in the race to sign Marseille star Maxime Lopez, with three Premier League sides now interested in the French U21 international.Advertisement Loading… last_img read more

Read More

DNR Program Teaches Skills To New Hunters

first_imgINDIANAPOLIS — Registration is open for a free DNR program that teaches participants how to hunt white-tailed deer in Indiana.Hunt, Fish, Eat starts Aug. 19 in Indianapolis and Aug. 27 in Bloomington. The program is a four-session series, with an optional fifth session. Sessions are once a week and offer hands-on learning in a safe environment.Hunt, Fish, Eat helps new hunters ages 18 and older to improve their self-reliance skills and to learn to harvest a delicious source of fresh, local meat.Curriculum will focus on laws and regulations, firearms and safety, locating a hunting spot, tracking and field dressing your harvest, and handling and preparing your venison for the table.Each session includes an opportunity to sample venison recipes from instructors and examine a variety of hunting gear and resources.Participants should attend all sessions. All equipment is provided.Register at dnr.IN.gov/fishwild/7548.htm.last_img read more

Read More

Twisters Get Win Over Cougars

first_imgThe Oldenburg Academy Twisters Varsity Baseball team defeated The South Decatur Cougars 10-6 to improve to 8-10 on the season.OA Batting:  Nick Bischoff 1-3, 2 runs, rbi, bb; Chase Hogg 1-2, 3 runs, bb, hbp; Sam Gast 2-2, 3 runs, 3 run HR, sac fly, bb, 5 rbi; Tanner Alley 3-4, 3 rbi; Aaron Huber 2-4, run, double, 2 rbi; Tyler Hesselbrock 0-4, run; Dalton Mooney 1-2, 2 runs, bb; Zach Pottschmidt 3-3, 3 runs, 2 doubles, rbi; and Ian Dickey 0-3, run.OA Pitching:  Tyler Hesselbrock   5 IP, 6 earned runs, 9 hits, 3 k, 5 bb.    Win.Next game: at Union Co. 5/19/16.Courtesy of Twisters Coach Doug Behlmer.last_img read more

Read More

Mary Ann Addison

first_imgMary Ann Addison, 60, of Sunman passed away Saturday, March 14, 2020 at Margaret Mary Health in Batesville.  Mary was born Sunday, October 4, 1959 in Batesville, Indiana, the daughter of the late Joseph and Jennie (Buchanan) Goodpaster.  Mary worked as a bartender for Irish Bowl in Moores Hill, Milan Country Club, and the Moores Hill Legion; and worked at the Super Value in Milan.  She was a member of Moores Hill American Legion Auxiliary; enjoyed playing pool; watching food network; and enjoyed spending time with family, especially her grandchildren.Mary is survived by her fiancée Thomas Nelson Jr. of Sunman; daughters: Kristie Addison of Aurora, Kenya Joe Addison of Sunman, and Katie Marie Addison of Moores Hill; many grandchildren; one great grandchild; brothers and sisters: Scott & Diana Goodpaster of Dillsboro, Joseph and Patty Goodpaster of Aurora, Vernon Goodpaster of Indianapolis, John Goodpaster and Bobbie Goodpaster both of Patriot, Jane Smith of Lawrenceburg, Betty and Mike South of East Enterprise, and Wanda Morton of Vevay; and good friend Debbie.  She was preceded in death by her parents.A service celebrating her life will be held at 12 Noon Wednesday, March 18, 2020 at Sibbett-Moore Funeral Home in Moores Hill with Mike McClanahan officiating.  Burial will follow in Mt. Sinai Cemetery.  Family and friends may gather to share and remember her from 11 AM – 12 Noon Wednesday also at the funeral home, with Moores Hill Auxiliary service at 11:45 AM.  Memorials may be given in honor of Mary to the family.  Sibbett-Moore Funeral Home entrusted with arrangements, 16717 Manchester Street, Box 156, Moores Hill, IN 47032, (812) 744-3280.  You may go to www.sibbettmoore.com to leave an online condolence message for the family.last_img read more

Read More