Tag: 419SH龙凤

Mo Farah Challenges Usain Bolt to a Race for

The fastest man in the world, Usain Bolt, has been challenged to a race for charity by Great Britain’s distant runner Mo Farah, but the race may take the sprinter out of his comfort zone.“It’d be great to be able to do a distance where people vote in what distance will be suitable, and then get a judge and then come in the middle with that distance and train for it,” said Britain’s Farah, who won the 5,000 and 10,000 meters at last year’s London’s Olympics. “Bolt, are you up for that? Come on, you got to do it.”With no one else to beat on the track, Bolt – who won the 100 and 200 in world-record time at the 2008 Beijing Games, then defended those titles at last year’s Olympics –  is considering Farah’s challenge.“That sounds fun. It’s going to be hard, but for me it’s charity, so it’s just all about fun and enjoyment,” Bolt said. “For me, I’m up for anything if it’s possible.”The issue with this challenge is deciding on a fair distance. What would you consider a fair? Give us your opinion. read more

Read More

ADC Study 200 Projects Ready to Start with DCIP Funding

first_img ADC AUTHOR Congress could help start hundreds of infrastructure projects across the country by appropriating money to the Defense Community Infrastructure Program (DCIP), according to analysis the Association of Defense Communities released this week.“This ready-to-go infrastructure plan makes national security the first priority,” ADC writes in “Implementing the Defense Community Infrastructure Program: A Survey of Projects Ready to Enhance Military Value.”Congress created DCIP in the defense authorization bill to allow for DOD matching grants to state and local governments for critical off-base infrastructure needs affecting installations’ resilience and readiness.A national survey helped ADC identify more than 200 projects in 28 states that could be eligible for DCIP funding. The report describes the projects, which range from transportation and public safety to utilities and other joint services.The defense bill authorized up to $100 million for DCIP, but that would need to be officially appropriated by Congress.last_img read more

Read More

Central government under pressure from tobacco industry ahead of WHO conference

first_imgThe Indian government is standing up against reported “pressure tactics” being employed by the $11 billion tobacco industry ahead of the November 7-12 World Health Organization (WHO) conference on the Global Anti-tobacco treaty: Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC).Delegates from about 180 countries will aim to revise the treaty that has been in force since 2005. The treaty aims to deter tobacco use that kills around 6 million people a year.The industry in India, the world’s third-biggest tobacco producer says tough FCTC measures will threaten livelihoods among the estimated 46 million people linked to the sector and hence want Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government to soften its stance.To this effect, industry and farmer groups wrote to officials across government, requesting them to be allowed to attend the WHO FCTC conference and be part of India’s delegation. The agriculture ministry also received a near-6,000-page petition signed by more than 100,000 farmers seeking protection from FCTC rules.The event has also been criticized for lacking transparency as the past proceedings have been closed to the public and industry representatives. Discontent is also simmering in the industry, as measures imposed this year, has forced tobacco companies to print bigger health warnings on tobacco products.This month, a tobacco farmers’ group questioned the legality of India implementing the FCTC treaty and also asked the Delhi High Court to allow stakeholders entry into the conference proceedings. A judge last week asked the government to “consider” the plea, but did not rule on the other requests.”If we take them in the delegation, the Government of India may feel embarrassed. We will not act on these (lobbying documents),” one anonymous health ministry official was quoted saying to Reuters.On Thursday, nearly 1,000 tobacco farmers staged silent protests in Delhi, outside the federal health ministry and the WHO regional office.Meanwhile, WHO FCTC Convention Secretariat in Geneva said that it welcomes India’s stand, while adding that no country should have delegation members linked to the tobacco industry.Conference decisions on treaty provisions – designed for eventual implementation at national level by signatories – have a direct bearing on the global tobacco industry that Euromonitor International estimates is worth $784 billion this year.Topics for debate at conference include alternative livelihoods for tobacco farmers, e-cigarettes and trade and investment issues.Smoking kills more than 1 million people a year in India, BMJ Global Health estimates. The WHO says tobacco-related diseases cost the country $16 billion annually.last_img read more

Read More

Scientists Learning More About How Harveys Floodwaters Behaved

first_img Share Listen 00:00 /00:44 NASARunoff from Hurricane Harvey as seen by satellite imaging.After studying how Harvey’s floodwaters moved through Houston toward the Gulf of Mexico, scientists are learning more about how the flooding behaved.The findings were discussed an annual meeting of ocean scientists in Portland, Oregon on Tuesday. A study from the University of Florida found that Houston’s bayous and rivers were so overwhelmed by rain that key draining points became clogged. The study’s author, Arnoldo Valle-Levinson, explained that as Buffalo Bayou was trying to empty floodwaters into Galveston Bay, flows from the San Jacinto River at times caused the flooding to push back up into the Houston area, which helped keep water levels high for days.Valle-Levinson said sea level rise made the bottleneck worse.“The ocean was preconditioning the flooding in Houston and in Galveston Bay,” he said.Another study from Texas A&M did find some good news: the storm’s contaminated floodwaters didn’t flow far enough into the Gulf of Mexico to reach the protected Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Xlast_img read more

Read More

Growth mindset found to temper impact of poverty on student achievement

first_img © 2016 Phys.org Seeing the benefits of failure shapes kids’ beliefs about intelligence Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Larkmead School. Credit: CC-BY-SA-2.5,2.0,1.0 Citation: Growth mindset found to temper impact of poverty on student achievement (2016, July 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-07-growth-mindset-temper-impact-poverty.htmlcenter_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences The concept of intelligence is difficult to pin down, much less measure. So, too, is answering the question of whether it is possible for a person to become more intelligent by trying—most scientists in the field believe that it is mostly fixed at birth. But because it cannot be proven, people tend to have their own opinions—those who believe that a person can become more intelligent through hard work are referred to in psychological terms as having a growth mindset. Conversely, those who believe that intelligence is fixed at birth are referred to has having a fixed mindset.In order to gain some insight into whether such beliefs can have an impact on academic performance, the researchers worked with the public school system in Chile in 2012—they tested 75 percent of the entire class of 10th grade students and then monitored their academic performance. In addition to demographic questions, students were also asked questions about whether they believed intelligence was fixed at birth or whether it could be improved through hard work, such as by studying schoolwork.In studying the data, the researchers found that as expected students living in poverty tended to have much less academic success. They also found that students living in poverty were much more likely to have a fixed mindset. But they also found that those students living in poverty who had a growth mindset tended to do much better academically than those living in poverty who had a fixed mindset—so much better that their scores were nearly equal to students who were not living in poverty but who had a fixed mindset. These results, the researchers suggest, indicate that targeted interventions may help low-achieving students living in poverty perform at a higher level; however, the researchers are quick to point out that they are not advocating substituting mindset manipulation for poverty reduction programs. (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers from Stanford University has found that high school children living in poverty who have a growth mindset tend to do better in school than those with a fixed mindset. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Susana Claro, David Paunesku and Carol Dweck describe a study they carried out with high school sophomores in Chile, what they learned, and what their findings may indicate regarding children, education and poverty. More information: Susana Claro et al. Growth mindset tempers the effects of poverty on academic achievement, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2016). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1608207113AbstractTwo largely separate bodies of empirical research have shown that academic achievement is influenced by structural factors, such as socioeconomic background, and psychological factors, such as students’ beliefs about their abilities. In this research, we use a nationwide sample of high school students from Chile to investigate how these factors interact on a systemic level. Confirming prior research, we find that family income is a strong predictor of achievement. Extending prior research, we find that a growth mindset (the belief that intelligence is not fixed and can be developed) is a comparably strong predictor of achievement and that it exhibits a positive relationship with achievement across all of the socioeconomic strata in the country. Furthermore, we find that students from lower-income families were less likely to hold a growth mindset than their wealthier peers, but those who did hold a growth mindset were appreciably buffered against the deleterious effects of poverty on achievement: students in the lowest 10th percentile of family income who exhibited a growth mindset showed academic performance as high as that of fixed mindset students from the 80th income percentile. These results suggest that students’ mindsets may temper or exacerbate the effects of economic disadvantage on a systemic level.last_img read more

Read More

Be Sure to Look Around the Office When Searching for Gaps in

first_img Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now » Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. 3 min read What’s inside  your own company may hurt you. Recent research reveals that internal security breaches, including accidental ones by careless employees, are dangerous and rampant.Your business’s greatest cyber threat could  be festering right inside your offices. A recent report by Forrester Research, called “Understand the State of Data Security and Privacy,” shows that one-fourth of survey respondents said that a malicious employee was the most common means to a data breach within the past year. However, respondents noted that 36 percent of data breaches resulted from employee errors.Related: 10 Data-Security Measures You Can’t Do WithoutA report from MeriTalk found that 49 percent of compromises occur when workers bypass security measures, e.g., downloading e-mail files. This report focused on the federal government. If the feds can’t protect themselves, how the heck can small businesses?Businesses are spending more and more resources on protection, such as antivirus software, anti-phishing software and firewalls, plus teaching employees security awareness but the problems are crooked insiders and careless employees.The MeriTalk report also reveals that 66 percent of respondents see security as time consuming and restrictive, while 60 percent believe their work takes longer due to additional cyber security tactics. Another 20 percent say they can’t complete their work due to security measures and 31 percent skirt around security measures at least once per week.The Forrester study reveals that 36 percent of data breaches come from accidental misuse of data by workers. Only 42 percent of respondents received security training and 57 percent weren’t even aware of their company’s current security protocols. One in four reported a breach was caused by malicious inside activity.What should be done? To start, focus on workers with access to sensitive data, such as employees in human resources, accounting, legal, administration and personnel but also company officers and contractors. Businesses need to work with all the key departments to identify vulnerabilities and devise security tactics that don’t obstruct productivity. Determine the level of risk for various kinds of data and set protections accordingly.Related: 5 Ways to Avoid a Costly Data Security BreachFollowing that, conduct a cost/benefit analysis. Review the different technologies that can be incorporated with the company’s existing systems. This includes data loss prevention technologies and internal system status monitoring. The goal is to limit who has access to what kind of data. Determine why an individual needs the data.Companies also need to examine their weaknesses from an outside-attack perspective. System-wide encryption should be implemented, as well as tools that report alerts and events. Access controls should be inspected and put in place, along with password management and multi-factor authentication.Device recognition is crucial. There must also be disposal for e-data, paper data and discarded devices.Transparency is also important. The more transparent that a business’s network security and security policies are, the more effective and clear each department will be communicating their requirements, needs and differences.Don’t be let efforts to combat outside cybercriminals blind you to internal threats. Attention on one should not diffuse attention on the other.Related: A Lack of Communication on Cyber Security Will Cost Your Business Big (Infographic) August 18, 2014last_img read more

Read More

3 Ways Scrappy Entrepreneurs Can Keep Data Scientists on Board and Motivated

first_img 5 min read These days, there’s a lot being said about big data and the value that comes from properly utilizing it. I’ve written previously about the importance of having a data science team. The next goal is to figure out how to keep those data scientists happy.Related: Look for These 7 Characteristics Before Hiring a Data ScientistAt The Data Incubator, we’ve spoken to hundreds of companies looking to hire data scientists from our training program. They’ve ranged from large corporations like Capital One and eBay to smaller, nimbler outfits like Betterment, Upstart and Mashable; and all have been eager for suggestions on how to retain their data scientists.Even without the capital provided by a larger corporation, there are plenty of ways — most of them free — for scrappy entrepreneurs to keep their data scientists engaged and on board. Here are three tips:1. Give your data scientist a purpose.It’s important for data scientists to understand how the work they do fits in with the broader mission of the business. To help make them feel like valued members of the team, have them spend time with business or product units. This will provide them context to better understand the problems they are facing and, in turn, will strengthen their analyses.Feeling valued will also lead them to make better products and deliver better services to your customers. The more connected they feel, the better their work will be.Data scientists, like many technical employees, get motivated by solving challenging problems. So, find intellectually stimulating new questions for them to work on or ask them to come up with their own. Engage them by encouraging them to work on compelling data sets. Allow them to work with your engineering staff to automate their repetitive weekly tasks. These things will help keep them connected to the company and keep them mentally sharp.2. Help your data scientist foster a sense of ownership.Entrepreneurs are often strapped for cash, so it makes sense to allow your data scientists to utilize his or her favorite open-source tools. Data scientists don’t exist in a vacuum; they’re part of a larger network of peers collaborating in an open-source movement. Encouraging them to contribute to open-source projects, and giving them the time to do so, gives them a greater sense of ownership and a broader purpose: contributing to the open-source community. If open source alternatives are not available, buy or build your own tools. Seek the data scientists’ input for the procurement or purchasing process. In the same way that a chef gets frustrated working with someone else’s dull knives, data scientists will become equally frustrated if forced to use the wrong tools for the job. Involving them in the decision-making process will increase their sense of ownership and avoid jeopardizing their morale and desire to stay with your company.Related: Hire Better Talent With a Big-Data ScientistRecognize the accomplishments of your data scientists and make sure you give them credit for their hard work. Good data scientists can take terabytes of data from a number of sources and synthesize that data into a single, succinct graph. This can be challenging work, even if they make it look easy, and this work is often overlooked.Letting your data scientists present their findings to management (and publicly thanking them when they do so) will help them feel connected to the company’s broader mission. And, after all, no one is more familiar with the analysis than the data scientist who performed it.3. Provide your data scientists with the support they needAs an entrepreneur, you may not have a team of engineers set up to assist your data scientist. Even so, recognize that data science and engineering go hand in hand, and do what you can to provide enough engineering support for your data scientist to get the job done. If the data clusters are slow, it will be difficult for your data scientists to iterate quickly, and the result will be a loss of motivation and creativity.They may also want software tooling support so that they are not writing MapReduce from scratch. Make sure the tools at hand are appropriate for the job in terms of both type and speed.There are also always new skills for data scientists to learn that could help them better leverage data to the company’s benefit. When possible, invest in their education. If you can afford to do so, pay for additional training classes to keep them on the cutting edge. As a less expensive option, cover lunch so they can hold seminars to teach one other new tricks or provide space for hosting meetups with academics and data scientists from other companies.Doing these things will show that your company really does care about the data scientists and the work they do. Plus, you’ll be building up your team’s skill set in the process.Entrepreneurs are notoriously scrappy and capable of coming up with creative solutions to the challenges they face. Utilizing some of these techniques should enable you to keep your data scientists engaged and on board. And the more engaged they are, the happier they’ll be to stick with you and provide quality work.Related: Want Big Data to Help Your Marketing Team? Hire a Data Scientist. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global October 2, 2015 Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now »last_img read more

Read More

Celestyal slashes summer cruise fares to Havana by 50

first_imgCelestyal slashes summer cruise fares to Havana by 50% Tags: Celestyal Cruises Friday, June 9, 2017 Travelweek Group TORONTO — Celestyal Cruises is turning up the heat this summer season with a new all-inclusive seven-day cruise promotion to Cuba.The offer features 50% off the cruise-only fare on all summer sailings until and including Aug. 21, 2017. Furthermore, kids younger than 12 sail for free.With promos and savings applied, rates start at US$1,171 per adult (embarking in Havana), based on double occupancy and includes:Seven-day Cuba Cruise featuring two days in Havana, one day in Cienfuegos, one day in Santiago de Cuba, and one day in Montego Bay, JamaicaIntimate 960 passenger capacity with yacht-like experienceInteractive shore excursion program in all portsAll meals onboardUnlimited beverage package, including alcoholic and non-alcoholic beveragesOnboard entertainmentGratuities and port chargesRemaining applicable 2017 sailing dates include: Montego Bay-Montego Bay (June 16, 23 & 30; July 7, 14, 21 & 28; Aug. 4 & 11); and Havana-Havana (June 12, 19 & 26; July 3, 10, 17, 24 & 31; Aug. 7, 14 & 21).More news:  Beep, beep! Transat hits the streets with Cubamania truckThe 50% off cruise fare offer is valid on new bookings made by July 31 for select sailings through August 2017. Reservations are based on a first-come, first-serve basis.Celestyal Cruises is celebrating its fourth year of cruise operation in Cuba, with cruises embarking every Monday from Havana and every Friday from Montego Bay, Jamaica. Posted by << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more

Read More