Tag: 阿拉爱上海

Ja Scorpions trio among top performers in NAGICO Super50

first_imgPORT-OF-SPAIN, Trinidad (WICB):Andre McCarthy of Jamaica Scorpions topped the batting table, while his teammate, Damion Jacobs, and Delorn Johnson of Windward Islands Volcanoes were the leading bowlers at the end of the group stage of the NAGICO Super50 Tournament.The 28-year-old McCarthy, playing his fourth season at the senior regional level, scored 251 runs in six innings at an average of 41.83 in Group ‘A’ in Trinidad and Tobago (T&T). His best score was a match-winning 118 against ICC Americas – his maiden century.Close behind him is Assad Fudadin of Guyana Jaguars. He has scored 250 runs at an impressive average of 62.50 runs an innings. The left-hander’s best knock was a match-winning 103 not out against Combined Campuses & Colleges Marooners in the sixth match at Warner Park, which helped his side secure their semi-final spot.Johnson, the tall left-arm pacer from St Vincent, took 14 wickets in just 41.5 overs in five group matches at a cost of 15.21 as the Volcanoes topped Group ‘B’ in St Kitts. He had career-best figures of 6-37 against Marooners.Jacobs, the attacking leg-spinner, took his 14 wickets in six matches in T&T. He was consistent throughout and had best figures for 5-22 against the ICC Americas.As the tournament heads into the final phase from Wednesday, Jonathan Carter of Barbados Pride and John Campbell of Scorpions lead the chase for Best All-rounder.Carter, who bats left-handed, has so far made 156 runs and captured seven wickets with his right-arm medium-pace in six matches. His economy rate of 3.16 runs per over is one of the best in the tournament.Campbell, who is also ambidextrous, has made 169 runs at the top of the order as a left-handed opener and captured six wickets with his off-spin.TOP STATSBatting:AndrÈ McCarthy (JAM) – 251 runsAssad Fudadin (GUY) – 250 runsNkrumah Bonner (LWD) – 223 runsBowling:Delorn Johnson (WWD) – 14 wicketsDamion Jacobs (JAM) – 14 wicketsMervin Mathew (WWD) – 12 wicketsAllrounders:Jonathan Carter (BAR) – 159 runs, 7 wicketsJohn Campbell (JAM) – 169 runs, 6 wicketsAndrÈ McCarthy (JAM) – 251 runs, 4 wicketslast_img read more

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SOCCER: ULSTER SENIOR LEAGUE LATEST

first_imgDrumkeen United and Letterkenny Rovers lock horns this evening in the final of this season’s Donegal News Ulster Senior League Cup. Rovers go in a slight favourites but with Drumkeen United renowned as cup specialists, a tight game is expected, with the possibility of the game being decided in extra time or even penalties.The game kicks off at 5pm and is at Dry Arch Park- home of Bonagee United.In the Ulster Senior League , Kildrum Tigers defeated Buncranna Hearts by 2 goals to 1 on Wednesday night. The Tigers can move to within 4 points of Derry City Reserves when they take on Bonagee United in the only league fixture this afternoon at Station Road, St Johnston. Bonagee who lie bottom of the table parted company with their manager Peter Moran at the start of the week and have appointed assistant manager Shaun “Budgie” Sandilands to run the team until the end of the season. Yesterday in the USL Division One , two goals from David O’Carroll gave Letterkenny Rovers a 2-1 victory over neighbours Bonagee United. Tomorrow(Monday), Swilly Rovers have home advantage over Drumkeen United.RESULTS ULSTER SENIOR LEAGUEBuncrana Hearts 1-2 Kildrum TigersDPD USL DIVISION ONELetterkenny Rovers 2-1 Bonagee UnitedFIXTURESSunday 29th JulyULSTER SENIOR LEAGUEKildrum Tigers v Bonagee United Ko 2pm DONEGAL NEWS LEAGUE CUP FINAL-Dry Arch Park 5pmDrumkeen United v Letterkenny RoversMonday 30th JulyDPD USL DIVISION ONE Swilly Rovers v Drumkeen United Ko 7.30 pmUSL DIVISION ONE MATCH REPORTLETTERKENNY ROVERS 2BONAGEE UNITED 1Letterkenny Rovers secured all three points in this local derby clash at Leckview Park and put a dent in Bonagee United’s title aspirations.In a closely contestd match, it was ultimately decided by two goals in the space of four mnutes shortly after the half-time interval by Rovers midfielder David O’Carroll.Chances were few and far between in the first half although Rovers netminder Jason Quinn was called into action to make a tremendous point blank save to deny Jason Doherty from close range.The home side stamped their authority on the game almost immediately after the break. James Gillen escaped his marker down the right flank before providing the perfect delivery for O’Carroll to connect with a beautiful drive into the back of the net from 10 yards.Boosted by the lead goal, Rovers went in search of a second and were duly rewarded on 50 minutes. Again, Gillen was the provider wth a cross from the right hand side and with the Bonagee defence at odds, O’Carroll ghosted in at the back post for his second.The experienced midfielder did have the ball in the net again but this time his effort was ruled out for offside.With three minutes to go, Bonagee got a lifeline when their hard working front man Jason Doherty snatched a goal but they were unable to force home an equaliser while at the other end Peter McGlynn can close to adding a third for Rovers only to be stopped by goalkeeper Conor Harley.Referee – Stephen TonerSOCCER: ULSTER SENIOR LEAGUE LATEST was last modified: July 28th, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Ulster Senior Leaguelast_img read more

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All weather pitch and proposed park for Stranorlar moves a step closer

first_imgA town park and multipurpose all-weather pitch for the Twin Towns area has moved a step closer.Local county councillor Patrick McGowan has welcomed the progress after planning for the proposed €1.2M park was adopted.He said “I have been driving this project for a long time and am delighted that we are finally seeing light at the end of the tunnel. “The decision which was proposed by me at today’s full council meeting means the Council can move to complete to purchase the lands as agreed now with planning being secured.”The townpark as recommended by council will be stand alone as one proposal was to include the all-weather multipurpose pitch in the park itself in Drumboe but that is not the case now.The proposed park will be kept for walks, children’s playground, recreational, open space andwhich will be very much in keeping with the surrounding area. The civil war monument (Martyrs monument) will act as a focal point as well .Drumboe is a very relaxing area where people regularly goe for walks in one of Ireland’s most varied woodlands. In relation to the Multipurpose, all-weather full-size pitch the council has secured €1.2M peace 1v funding which will be constructed at the Stranorlar sports master plan area located next to the existing sports facilities.Finn Harps new stadium and the Finn valley centre sports master plan area will be enhanced by the addition of this state of the art all-weather pitch which will be available to a variety of sports and will support outdoor training all year round day and night.The facility will include changing rooms and flood lighting.The Council are working on management arrangements at present and this will include equal access for all types of sports as was envisaged when applying for under the peace programmewhich was zoned almost 20 years ago will.“Two year ago I approached the land owners at Drumboe and commenced the negotiations which the council are now pursuing, this part 8 is a direct result of that and when adopted will allow the Council to complete the deal. “The multipurpose full size all weather pitch is something I have been pursuing almost as long as the town park. I persuaded the council some years ago to make an application for funding but at that stage we were unsuccessful so when peace 1V opened and the Council held meetings around the County seeking proposals I convinced my colleagues on BASICC to propose the All weather pitch and which lead to this successful project receiving funding .“I am very grateful to BASICC , Donegal CO Council managment & staff , LCDC members and staff and of course Peace1V supporting what will be a great facility.“This will be a massive boost to the County designated Stranorlar sporting centre of excellence.“All we need now is for the FAI troubles to be settled and a big dream back in 2000 by Alice Bonner, Francey Coyle, myself and others will really take off,” said Cllr McGowan. All weather pitch and proposed park for Stranorlar moves a step closer was last modified: April 25th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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The Africa you never see

first_img23 October 2006In the waiting area of a large office complex in Accra, Ghana, it’s standing room only as citizens with bundles of cash line up to buy shares of a mutual fund that has yielded an average 60% annually for the past seven years.Africa: Open for BusinessCarol Pineau, a journalist with more than 10 years’ experience reporting on Africa, is the producer and director of the film Africa: Open for Business, which aired worldwide on the BBC in May 2006 and has been released for purchase on DVD at Africa: Open for Business.They’re entrusting their hard-earned cash to a local company called Databank, which invests in stock markets in Ghana, Nigeria, Botswana and Kenya that consistently rank among the world’s top growth markets.Chances are you haven’t read or heard anything about Databank in your daily newspaper or on the evening news, where the little coverage of Africa that’s offered focuses almost exclusively on the negative – the virulent spread of HIV/Aids, genocide in Darfur, the chaos of Zimbabwe.Yes, Africa is a land of wars, poverty and corruption. The situation in places like Darfur, Sudan desperately cries out for more media attention and international action.But Africa is also a land of stock markets, high rises, Internet cafes and a growing middle class. This is the part of Africa that functions. And this Africa also needs media attention, if it’s to have any chance of fully joining the global economy.Africa’s media image comes at a high cost – even, at the extreme, the cost of lives. Stories about hardship and tragedy aim to tug at our heartstrings, getting us to dig into our pockets or urge Congress to send more aid.But no country or region ever developed thanks to aid alone. Investment, and the job and wealth creation it generates, is the only road to lasting development. That’s how China, India and the Asian Tigers did it.Highest return on FDI in the worldYet while Africa, according to the US government’s Overseas Private Investment Corporation, offers the highest return in the world on foreign direct investment, it attracts the least.Unless investors see the Africa that’s worthy of investment, they won’t put their money into it. And that lack of investment translates into job stagnation, continued poverty and limited access to education and health care.Consider a few facts. The Ghana Stock Exchange regularly tops the list of the world’s highest-performing stock markets. Botswana, with its A+ credit rating, boasts one of the highest per capita government savings rates in the world, topped only by Singapore and a handful of other fiscally prudent nations.Cellphones are making phenomenal profits on the continent. Brand-name companies like Coca-Cola, GM, Caterpillar and Citibank have invested in Africa for years and are quite bullish on the future.Caricaturing a continentThe failure to show this side of Africa creates a one-dimensional caricature of a complex continent. Imagine if 9/11, the Oklahoma City bombing and school shootings were all that the rest of the world knew about America.I recently produced a documentary on entrepreneurship and private enterprise in Africa. Throughout the year-long process, I came to realise how all of us in the media – even those with a true love of the continent – portray it in a way that’s truly to its detriment.The first cameraman I called to film the documentary laughed and said, “Business and Africa, aren’t those contradictory terms?” The second got excited imagining heart-warming images of women’s co-ops and market stalls brimming with rustic crafts. Several friends simply assumed I was doing a documentary on Aids. After all, what else does one film in Africa?The little-known fact is that businesses are thriving throughout Africa. With good governance and sound fiscal policies, countries like Botswana, Ghana, Uganda, Senegal and many more are bustling, their economies growing at surprisingly robust rates.Somalia: surprise, surprisePrivate enterprise is not just limited to the well-behaved nations. You can’t find a more war-ravaged land than Somalia, which has been without a central government for more than a decade.The big surprise? Private enterprise is flourishing. Mogadishu has the cheapest cellphone rates on the continent, mostly due to no government intervention. In the northern city of Hargeysa, the markets sell the latest satellite phone technology. The electricity works.When the state collapsed in 1991, the national airline went out of business. Today, there are five private carriers and price wars keep the cost of tickets down. This is not the Somalia you see in the media.Obviously life there would be dramatically improved by good governance – or even just some governance – but it’s also true that, through resilience and resourcefulness, Somalis have been able to create a functioning society.African solutionsMost African businesses suffer from an extreme lack of infrastructure, but the people I met were too determined to let this stop them. It just costs them more. Without reliable electricity, most businesses have to use generators. They have to dig bore-holes for a dependable water source. Telephone lines are notoriously out of service, but cellphones are filling the gap.Throughout Africa, what I found was a private sector working hard to find African solutions to African problems.One example that will always stick in my mind is the CEO of Vodacom Congo, the largest cellphone company in that country. Alieu Conteh started his business while the civil war was still raging. With rebel troops closing in on the airport in Kinshasa, no foreign manufacturer would send in a cell phone tower, so Conteh got locals to collect scrap metal, which they welded together to build one. That tower still stands today.As I interviewed successful entrepreneurs, I was continually astounded by their ingenuity, creativity and steadfastness. These people are the future of the continent. They are the ones we should be talking to about how to move Africa forward.Obsession with victims, savioursInstead, the media concentrates on victims or government officials, and as anyone who has worked in Africa knows, government is more often a part of the problem than of the solution.When the foreign media descend on the latest crisis, the person they look to interview is invariably the foreign saviour, an aid worker from the United States or Europe. African saviours are everywhere, delivering aid on the ground. But they don’t seem to be in our cultural belief system.It’s not just the media, either. Look at the literature put out by almost any non-governmental organisation. The better ones show images of smiling African children – smiling because they have been helped by the NGO. The worst promote the extended-belly, flies-on-the-face cliche of Africa, hoping that the pain of seeing those images will fill their coffers. “We hawk poverty”, one NGO worker admitted to me.Last November, ABC’s “Primetime Live” aired a special on Britain’s Prince Harry and his work with Aids children in Lesotho. The segment, titled “The Forgotten Kingdom: Prince Harry in Lesotho”, painted the tiny nation as a desperate, desolate place. The programme’s message was clear: This helpless nation at last had a knight – or prince – in shining armour.By the time the charity addresses came up at the end, you were ready to give, and that’s good. Lesotho needs help with its Aids problem. But would it really have hurt the story to add that this land-locked nation with few natural resources has jump-started its economy by aggressively courting foreign investment?The reality is that it’s anything but a “forgotten kingdom”, as a dramatic increase in exports has made it the top beneficiary of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA), a duty-free, quota-free US-Africa trade agreement. More than 50 000 people have gotten jobs through the country’s initiatives.Couldn’t the programme have portrayed an African country that was in need of assistance, but was neither helpless nor a victim?Whose portrait of Africa?
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Cathay appoints new CEO in senior management reshuffle.

first_imgRupert Hogg has been named the new chief executive of Hong Kong’s Cathay pacific as part of sweeping management changes at the airline in the wake of its first loss in eight years.He replaces Ivan Chu, who steps down from the CEO role after three years to become chairman of John Swire & Sons (China) from May 1.  Chu will also step down as chairman of Hong Dragon Airlines but will remain on the Cathay and Swire Pacific boards as a non-executive director.Hogg moves into the role as Cathay is reeling from increased competition from low-cost and Chinese carriers as well as a bad call on fuel hedging.Cathay Pacific’s profit nosedived last year by almost 110 per cent to a net loss of $HK575m ($US74m) amid warnings from the Hong Kong group that it expected the environment this year to remain challenging.It blamed the worse than expected result on “intense and increased” competition combined with economic factors such as the strength of the Hong Kong Dollar and reduced economic growth in mainland China.He faces the task of completing a restructuring started by his predecessor aimed at making the carrier more responsive to an increasingly competitive environment.Cathay chairman John Slosar said Hogg, who also becomes the chairman of Cathay Dragon,  brought an impressive level of aviation and business experience to the job. “He has played a major role as Chief Operating Officer over the last three years and brings commercial focus and a spirit of innovation to our efforts to overcome the well-documented structural challenges facing the airline,’’ he said. “He is the right man to lead our team.”Other changes will see Cathay’s director corporate development and IT, Paul Loo, take on the position of chief customer and commercial officer from June 1 and Greg Hughes, now an executive at Hong Kong Aircraft Engineering Company, become the airline’s chief operations and service delivery officer.Cathay Dragon chief executive Algernon Yau, will take on the role Cathay director of service delivery appointed will remaining at his current job.Slosar, who also chairs Swire Pacific,  said he looked forward to working with Chu in his new role in the Swire group’s mainland China strategy and paid tribute to his efforts at Cathay.”Ivan played a key role in the airline’s management during some very good times and, more recently, some difficult and challenging times,’’ he said. “ In response, he led the team in devising the three-year transformation strategy which will provide the platform for Cathay’s medium-term recovery and continued development.’’last_img read more

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St George’s march on

first_imgSt George’s Brass Band keep time at the matches played at the historic St George’s Park in South Africa’s “biggest little city”, Port Elizabeth. With a repertoire ranging from orchestral pieces, calypso and jazz, they are, says band leader Jonathan Africa, unique in the cricketing world.The St Georges Brass Band is about the music and cricket. “As long as you remember that, everyone is welcome to join,” says Jonathan Africa. (Image: Jonathan Africa)Sulaiman PhilipIt is a few hours before the first ball is bowled at St George’s Park. The sun shines, the city buzzes with excitement. In one corner of town a group in matching shirts warms up. Fingers are made limber, deep breaths are exhaled into mouthpieces. Pursed lips blow into reeds. The parps of trumpets and trombones rise.Deep brassy clangs and high-toned hissing rise into the air as the St George’s Brass Band warm up at the home of band leader Jonathan Africa. Africa will lead his musicians to the stadium to soundtrack the day’s game, just as they have done for 20 years.“In those 20 years the most memorable game, for all of us, was in 2010 when the Warriors won the (domestic) double. For us in the band, we were an important part of that win.”Historic St George’s Park cricket ground in Port Elizabeth hosted the first Test played outside England or Australia. South Africa’s final Test before isolation was played here in 1970. Today its renovated Victorian eaves ring with the equally old school sounds of a brass band.Where fans in other grounds listen to piped music, local favourites or a seamless blend of hits, those at St George’s Park are treated to the vibrant, joyous noise of the St George’s Brass Band. “Our first game was a Benson & Hedges game. Eastern Province versus Border. That was 1994 and now, years later, we’re still here,” says Africa.The first movement for the band was in 1994, when musicians from Cape Town played during a game at St George’s. Africa takes up the story: “After the game, (Eastern Province) Cricket decided they wanted a similar vibe at games. We got the nod from the late Phillip Potgieter and Malcolm van Eck. Once we got the nod, the band grew quickly and we became the St George’s Band in 1996.”The difference is the Band. The St Georges Brass Band make cricket in Port Elizabeth different and memorable. (Image: Jonathan Africa)Twenty years later, the St George’s Brass Band is a uniquely South African institution. Newlands, in Cape Town, may have the mountain as a backdrop. But Port Elizabeth has the band – and the atmosphere that makes watching cricket there different.The band puts to bed the image of Port Elizabeth as a quaint, sleepy little town. This is the city the locals know, full of people who do innovative things, who believe they can change the world and the way their city is viewed, with a loud, joyful, celebratory noise.“We have grown. We do not just play at the cricket. We’re very active in our community. We are a community organisation aiming to develop our youth through music. Everyone can take part, every gender and race is welcome to take part in our training and development programmes.”Musicians come from all over the northern suburbs of Port Elizabeth and from Zwide Township. Some split their time between the Band and the SAPS Eastern Cape Band. Some have gone on to be teachers. “We also take part in the Coon Carnival during Cape Town’s Klopse Festival. We’re part of the Heideveld Entertainers; look out for us.”The late author and legendary athlete Dr George Sheehan described sport as theatre, a space where heroes were born and memories and hopes fuelled today’s passion. Sport was, he wrote, “singularly able to give us peak experiences where we feel completely one with the world and transcend all conflicts as we finally become our own potential”.St George’s Park has given members of the band an opportunity to fulfil their potential while filling their lives with heroes. Men, and yes it is just men, who have given them memories to be passed on to their children and their children’s children are fondly recalled.Africa reels off heroes: “Yoh! We had a number of them (heroes) over the years, like Hansie ‘Jou lekka ding’ Cronje, local boy Davy Jacobs, Basher ‘Big Bash’ Walters, Makhaya (Ntini), Lonwabo (Tsotsobe), AB (de Villiers), (Hashim) Amla and JP (Duminy). The international we remember was Shane Warne. And all the West Indies players always enjoy the band.”Give me Hope Johanna was the band’s first song, a favourite still despite their diverse repertoire. The band arranges and plays selected orchestral pieces, calypso and jazz. It is a range of music that celebrates what cricket means to its members.Like cricket, music packs together a lifetime of emotions in a few strokes. Music, like cricket, allows the band to suffer and die and rise again. So it was heartbreaking when they were refused permission to play. “That was our lowest point. We were not allowed to play in 2003. During the (Cricket) World Cup. In our own backyard. We could never understand why, and the cricket administrators never felt a need to tell us.”The Warriors, their fans and the members of the band are tied together. They exist to remind cricket fans of the warmth of the region’s people and the passion they feel for their team. The band celebrates what the city already knows: Port Elizabeth is the biggest small city.Hard work, sweat and ingenuity have made the band famous beyond the boundaries of the city. Their existence, their influence have extended beyond the few hours of a game of cricket. They are, as far as Africa knows, unique in the world of cricket. “Twenty years not out, and more to come.”The Band is a community organization developing youth through music. (Image: Jonathan Africa)last_img read more

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Minister Montague Says Domestic Airline A Priority

first_imgMinister of Transport and Mining, Hon. Robert Montague, says he is working to have a domestic airline operating in Jamaica in short order.“Having a domestic airline is one of my objectives because I believe that ordinary Jamaicans should have an option of taking… air transport, so I have it as one of my priorities,” he said.Mr. Montague was speaking to JIS News at the final in a series of consultations for the crafting of a new National Transport Policy (NTP), held on Wednesday (March 13) at The Knutsford Court Hotel in St. Andrew.He indicated that discussions are under way with three investment groups to start a domestic service.“The market can take up to two, and possibly three. I am leading the effort to have a domestic carrier up and running,” he said.The series of consultations, held with key stakeholders, will guide the revision of the transport policy, covering air, water, road, railway, and infrastructure and services.It identifies the issues faced in the development of the sector; the roles of Government, the private sector and the numerous authorities operating in the sector; the changes necessary in the regulatory structure; and environment and safety issues.last_img read more

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ThirdParty Financing Could Enhance Resilience Reduce Infrastructure Maintenance Backlog Senate Committee Says

first_imgOne of the ways the military services are improving their installations’ energy resilience is by leveraging private sector investment through energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) and utility energy service contracts (UESCs). In its report accompanying the fiscal 2019 defense authorization bill, the Senate Armed Services Committee says it supports the approach and “strongly encourages” DOD to leverage its facilities sustainment, restoration and modernization accounts, in combination with third-party funding sources, “to maximize energy infrastructure investments.” That tactic could help the department reduce its massive infrastructure maintenance backlog as well as enhance installation resilience, the panel states.The panel remains concerned, however, that DOD has failed to streamline the procurement processes used to enter ESPCs, UESCs and power purchase agreements. In turn, the committee directs the Pentagon to set “a department performance contracting goal along with a tracking system to identify and address project phase bottlenecks, with a timeline goal of 18 months from notice of opportunity to notice of intent to award.” The lawmakers also request DOD to brief the committee on its progress by March 1, 2019.Photo courtesy of Army Corps of Engineers Huntsville Center Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

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