Tag: 爱上海419

Arsenal youngster Reiss Nelson to join Hoffenheim on loan deal

first_imgArsenal have reportedly decided to sanction Reiss Nelson’s season-long loan move to German side HoffenheimThe 18-year-old is highly-rated at the Emirates but has found opportunities hard to come by.Nelson has under 12 months remaining on his current contract and is keen to secure himself regular first-team action.The Daily Mirror reports that a compromise has now been reached between Nelson and Arsenal.The agreement involves Nelson being allowed to go on loan for the remainder of the current campaign.Jadon SanchoMerson believes Arsenal should sign Sancho Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Borussia Dortmund winger Jadon Sancho might be the perfect player to play for the Gunners, according to former England international Paul Merson.In return, the young forward will agree to sign a new deal with the Gunners.Nelson has made a total of 16 appearances in all competitions for the senior side.But new boss Unai Emery is unlikely to give Nelson much playing time this year.Therefore, Arsenal have reached an agreement with Hoffenheim to loan Nelson.The Bundesliga club signed former Arsenal winger Serge Gnabry on loan from Bayern Munich last season.last_img read more

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ARREST LOG Wilmington Police Make 2 Arrests Issue 1 Summons

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — According to Wilmington Police Logs, Wilmington Police issued the following arrests and summonses between June 21, 2019 and June 27, 2019.Friday, June 21, 2019Thais Dias (29, Malden) was arrested on a warrant for unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle and speeding. (5:16pm)Saturday, June 22, 2019Matthew Figucia (22, Wilmington) was arrested for OUI Liquor. (12:58am)Patrick C. Taylor (26, Wilmington) was issued a summons for Operating A Motor Vehicle with a Suspended License. (8:29am)Sunday, June 23, 2019NoneMonday, June 24, 2019NoneTuesday, June 25, 2019NoneWednesday, June 26, 2019NoneThursday, June 27, 2019None(DISCLAIMER: This information is public information.  An arrest does not constitute a conviction.  Any arrested person is innocent until proven guilty.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedARREST LOG: Wilmington Police Make 2 Arrests & Issue 2 SummonsesIn “Police Log”ARREST LOG: Wilmington Police Make 1 Arrest & Issue 2 SummonsesIn “Police Log”ARREST LOG: Wilmington Police Make 5 Arrests & Issue 4 SummonsesIn “Police Log”last_img read more

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Microsoft will stop supporting Windows 7 one year from today

first_imgWindows 7 is on its way out. Microsoft If you still use Windows 7, it may be time to consider an upgrade. Starting Jan. 14, 2020, exactly one year from Monday, Microsoft will no longer support Windows 7. That means no more updates or security fixes for the operating system. “Changes and upgrades in technology are inevitable,” said Brad Anderson, corporate vice president for Microsoft 365, in a blog. “And there’s never been a better time to start putting in motion the things you need to do to shift your organization to a modern desktop with Microsoft 365.”Microsoft will continue to provide security updates for Windows 7 to business customers that pay for support, according to ZDNet, but not individual users.Windows 7 was released in 2009 and is still one of the most widely used desktop operating systems. Windows 10 finally overtook Windows 7 in the desktop market at the end of last year, according to ZDNet. NetMarketShare’s December 2018 report showed that 39.2 percent of the machines they collect data from used Windows 10, while 36.9 percent used Windows 7, according to ZDNet. In 2012, the computer giant decided to extend five more years of support for all editions of Windows 7 for individual users. First published on Jan. 14, 8:29 a.m. PT.Updates, 1:35 p.m. PT: Adds Microsoft 365 Vice President Brad Anderson statement.  See It Computers Software $20 Microsoft Windows 7 Mentioned Above Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate Tags Comments Amazoncenter_img Share your voice See it 5 CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Microsoft Windows 7 Review • Microsoft Windows 7 $4last_img read more

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Lloyds raises rare smile and dividend

first_imgLloyds raises rare smile – and dividend567 viewsLloyds raises rare smile – and dividend567 views00:00 / 00:00- 00:00:0000:00Lloyds raises rare smile – and dividend567 viewsBusinessSuccess has been hard to come by for banks of late. One though seems to have found a winning formula. Lloyds resuming dividend payments for the first time in 6 years. The UK lender was bailed outVentuno Web Player 4.50Success has been hard to come by for banks of late. One though seems to have found a winning formula. Lloyds resuming dividend payments for the first time in 6 years. The UK lender was bailed outlast_img read more

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Missing traders bones found in Savar

first_imgSavarMembers of Rapid Action Battalion (RAB) on Thursday recovered three pieces bones of a missing trader from a guest house in Uttar Boalia area of Ashulia, on the outskirts of Dhaka.RAB-8 company commander major Abdul Hakim said brick trader Billal Hossain, 50, son of late Gaher Ali of Singair upazila in Manikganj, went missing from Bathuni in Dhamrai upazila on 13 April 13.His wife Rokeya Begum filed a general diary with Dhamrai police station, reports UNB.Later, RAB members arrested prime accused Nasir Uddin Dipu and Murshida Akhter, caretakers of the guest house from Laltek area of Savar.Following their information, the elite force recovered the bones of Billal who was sliced into three pieces after murder and buried in the guest house.last_img read more

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Latif Siddique sent to Dhaka for treatment

first_imgIndependent candidate for Tangail-4 constituency Abdul Latif Siddique. Prothom Alo File PhotoIndependent candidate for Tangail-4 constituency Abdul Latif Siddique, who fell sick while continuing indefinite hunger strike protesting at an attack on his motorcade during electioneering, was sent to Dhaka for treatment Wednesday afternoon.Earlier in the morning, he was admitted to Tangail General Hospital as he fell sick, reports UNB.Tangail General Hospital supervisor Narayan Chandra Shah said they suggested taking him to a Dhaka hospital for better treatment as his condition deteriorated.Latif Siddique was sent to Dhaka with police protection, said Sayedur Rahman, officer-in-charge of Tangail Model police station.Demanding the withdrawal of Kalihati police station officer-in-charge and immediate arrest of those attacked his motorcade, former Awami League minister, who is contesting the upcoming election from Tangail-4 (Kalihati) constituency, began hunger strike on 16 December.He fell sick on Tuesday night while continuing his demonstration in front of the office of the returning officer and deputy commissioner of Tangail Shahidul Islam for the second consecutive day, braving cold and rain.Latif Siddique came under attack allegedly by the supporters of a local MP-backed union parishad chairman in Soratail of Kalihati upazila that left 20 people injured.last_img read more

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Houston Reacts To Supreme Court Fisher v UT Affirmative Action Ruling

first_imgWikipediaMichael Olivas, a UH law professor and the interim president of the University of Houston Downtown, celebrated the Supreme Court decision in Fisher v. University of Texas.“This is a very good day,” Olivas said. “It shows that there’s moral order restored in this universe.”Olivas said Mexican-Americans, for example, are still vastly underrepresented in the state’s major universities.The 4-3 ruling ends a years-long legal battle between Abigail Fisher, a white woman from Sugar Land, and the University of Texas at Austin.“I hope this is a signal to other disgruntled, white, aggrieved plaintiffs that just because they didn’t get in and because they weren’t admissible, it doesn’t mean that they lost their seat to some less deserving person of color,” Olivas said.The ruling upholds UT’s admissions program, which among other factors, considers the race and ethnicity of applicants.“It’s only a factor of a factor of a factor of who gets into the university,” said Charles “Rocky” Rhodes, a professor at the Houston College of Law.He said UT was able to provide evidence that Texas’ Top 10 Percent law wasn’t enough to ensure diversity in the school’s classrooms. The law mandates public colleges admit the top students from any of the state’s high schools.Rhodes said since UT’s system is so unique, the ruling won’t act as a precedent in future affirmative action cases.“But what it does do (is) show that the Supreme Court is not poised to strike down race-conscious admissions programs as long as those programs are supported by sufficient evidence of their necessity and need,” the professor said.Rhodes added that it sends a message to public colleges to make sure they really study how and if race should be considered as part of their admissions policies.The ruling does not end the debate over how schools achieve a diverse student body.At the University of Houston’s Student Center, education major Bianca Ezumah said diversity is one of the reasons she chose UH. But she didn’t think race should be considered in admissions.“I think you should admit people based off if you think they would excel at your university,” Ezumah said. “Or if you think they deserve the chance.”Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton criticized the ruling. In a statement, he said the opportunities at the University of Texas “should be available to all students based on their merit, not the color of their skin.”State Sen. Kel Seliger, R-Amarillo, chairs the Texas Senate Higher Education Committee. He said the decision confirms that UT’s admissions policy was designed to create diversity without discriminating against any group. X Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Share 00:00 /02:18last_img read more

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Scientists Learning More About How Harveys Floodwaters Behaved

first_img Share Listen 00:00 /00:44 NASARunoff from Hurricane Harvey as seen by satellite imaging.After studying how Harvey’s floodwaters moved through Houston toward the Gulf of Mexico, scientists are learning more about how the flooding behaved.The findings were discussed an annual meeting of ocean scientists in Portland, Oregon on Tuesday. A study from the University of Florida found that Houston’s bayous and rivers were so overwhelmed by rain that key draining points became clogged. The study’s author, Arnoldo Valle-Levinson, explained that as Buffalo Bayou was trying to empty floodwaters into Galveston Bay, flows from the San Jacinto River at times caused the flooding to push back up into the Houston area, which helped keep water levels high for days.Valle-Levinson said sea level rise made the bottleneck worse.“The ocean was preconditioning the flooding in Houston and in Galveston Bay,” he said.Another study from Texas A&M did find some good news: the storm’s contaminated floodwaters didn’t flow far enough into the Gulf of Mexico to reach the protected Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Xlast_img read more

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Chemists discover new type of molecular bond near white dwarf stars

first_imgImage of Sirius A and Sirius B taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. Sirius B, which is a white dwarf, can be seen as a faint pinprick of light to the lower left of the much brighter Sirius A. Image: NASA, ESA (Phys.org) — Most any chemistry student when asked, will say that there are just two ways atoms bond to make molecules: covalent and ionic. In the former, atoms are bonded together by sharing electrons, in the latter it’s due to the transfer of electrons from one atom to another leading to a Coulombic attraction between the ions. Now however, it appears there is a third kind of bond, though it doesn’t exist here on Earth. E. I. Tellgren, Kai K. Lange, T. Helgaker and M. R. Hoffmann from the University of Oslo, Norway and the University of North Dakota in the US have found that some molecules can form and hold together due to extremely high magnetic fields. As they write in their paper published in the journal Science, their calculations suggest that such molecules likely exist near white dwarf stars. Explore further More information: A Paramagnetic Bonding Mechanism for Diatomics in Strong Magnetic Fields, Science 20 July 2012: Vol. 337 no. 6092 pp. 327-331. DOI: 10.1126/science.1219703ABSTRACTElementary chemistry distinguishes two kinds of strong bonds between atoms in molecules: the covalent bond, where bonding arises from valence electron pairs shared between neighboring atoms, and the ionic bond, where transfer of electrons from one atom to another leads to Coulombic attraction between the resulting ions. We present a third, distinct bonding mechanism: perpendicular paramagnetic bonding, generated by the stabilization of antibonding orbitals in their perpendicular orientation relative to an external magnetic field. In strong fields such as those present in the atmospheres of white dwarfs (on the order of 105 teslas) and other stellar objects, our calculations suggest that this mechanism underlies the strong bonding of H2 in the triplet state and of He2 in the singlet state, as well as their preferred perpendicular orientation in the external field. Citation: Chemists discover new type of molecular bond near white dwarf stars (2012, July 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-07-chemists-molecular-bond-white-dwarf.html German team finds a way to link boron atoms with a triple bondcenter_img Journal information: Science This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Because it’s impossible, at least at this time, to create a magnetic field anywhere near as strong as that found near a white dwarf star, the researchers turned to quantum chemical simulations (full configuration-interaction) focusing on hydrogen atoms and the simple hydrogen molecule H2. At extremely hot temperatures, such as would exist near a white dwarf, the covalent bond that normally holds the molecule together wouldn’t survive and the molecule would come apart. But if there were a strong enough magnetic field (such as exists near a white dwarf) the spin states of the two atoms could align with the magnetic field (rather than exist as opposed) the molecule could bond and continue to stay that way. And that’s exactly what the team’s calculations showed, they’re calling it – perpendicular paramagnetic bonding.To further test their ideas, the team also ran helium through the simulations and found that they too could form perpendicular paramagnetic bonding of He2 molecules, though they were less stable.The researchers note that because of the different characteristics of hydrogen or helium molecules bonded together through magnetic forces near white dwarf stars, their spectrum should be different as well, which means that they should be detectable using telescopes tuned properly, assuming they exist in sufficient numbers.And just because such a strong magnetic field cannot currently be created in the lab, it doesn’t mean it can’t ever happen. If it does become possible, not only would magnetically bonded molecules be observable, but they might also be controllable by adjusting the amount of magnetism, paving the way perhaps to a quantum memory computer. © 2012 Phys.orglast_img read more

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Growth mindset found to temper impact of poverty on student achievement

first_img © 2016 Phys.org Seeing the benefits of failure shapes kids’ beliefs about intelligence Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Larkmead School. Credit: CC-BY-SA-2.5,2.0,1.0 Citation: Growth mindset found to temper impact of poverty on student achievement (2016, July 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-07-growth-mindset-temper-impact-poverty.htmlcenter_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences The concept of intelligence is difficult to pin down, much less measure. So, too, is answering the question of whether it is possible for a person to become more intelligent by trying—most scientists in the field believe that it is mostly fixed at birth. But because it cannot be proven, people tend to have their own opinions—those who believe that a person can become more intelligent through hard work are referred to in psychological terms as having a growth mindset. Conversely, those who believe that intelligence is fixed at birth are referred to has having a fixed mindset.In order to gain some insight into whether such beliefs can have an impact on academic performance, the researchers worked with the public school system in Chile in 2012—they tested 75 percent of the entire class of 10th grade students and then monitored their academic performance. In addition to demographic questions, students were also asked questions about whether they believed intelligence was fixed at birth or whether it could be improved through hard work, such as by studying schoolwork.In studying the data, the researchers found that as expected students living in poverty tended to have much less academic success. They also found that students living in poverty were much more likely to have a fixed mindset. But they also found that those students living in poverty who had a growth mindset tended to do much better academically than those living in poverty who had a fixed mindset—so much better that their scores were nearly equal to students who were not living in poverty but who had a fixed mindset. These results, the researchers suggest, indicate that targeted interventions may help low-achieving students living in poverty perform at a higher level; however, the researchers are quick to point out that they are not advocating substituting mindset manipulation for poverty reduction programs. (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers from Stanford University has found that high school children living in poverty who have a growth mindset tend to do better in school than those with a fixed mindset. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Susana Claro, David Paunesku and Carol Dweck describe a study they carried out with high school sophomores in Chile, what they learned, and what their findings may indicate regarding children, education and poverty. More information: Susana Claro et al. Growth mindset tempers the effects of poverty on academic achievement, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2016). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1608207113AbstractTwo largely separate bodies of empirical research have shown that academic achievement is influenced by structural factors, such as socioeconomic background, and psychological factors, such as students’ beliefs about their abilities. In this research, we use a nationwide sample of high school students from Chile to investigate how these factors interact on a systemic level. Confirming prior research, we find that family income is a strong predictor of achievement. Extending prior research, we find that a growth mindset (the belief that intelligence is not fixed and can be developed) is a comparably strong predictor of achievement and that it exhibits a positive relationship with achievement across all of the socioeconomic strata in the country. Furthermore, we find that students from lower-income families were less likely to hold a growth mindset than their wealthier peers, but those who did hold a growth mindset were appreciably buffered against the deleterious effects of poverty on achievement: students in the lowest 10th percentile of family income who exhibited a growth mindset showed academic performance as high as that of fixed mindset students from the 80th income percentile. These results suggest that students’ mindsets may temper or exacerbate the effects of economic disadvantage on a systemic level.last_img read more

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Taj Mahal Worlds most photographed monument

first_img“It’s a matter of pride to be photographed with the Taj Mahal,” said Denis, a tourist from Australia. These days, with almost every one in possession of a mobile or a digital camera, you can see people taking selfies or posing for a group photograph with friends or relatives. Now with the Taj Mahal getting its own Twitter handle and the monument complex equipped with WiFi facility, no one misses the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to shoot and share. The Taj has not lost its charm. It continues to remain the delight of photographers from all over the world.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Lonely Planet’s ‘ultimate travel list’ includes the Taj in the top five tourist destinations in the world. The Taj Mahal is annually visited by over six million people. Unofficial figures are 10 million, as children below 15 do not have to purchase a ticket to enter.Each day hordes of photographers — both amateurs and professionals — shoot pictures of the white marble mausoleum, bringing joy and excitement to those who pose against its backdrop. “Many feel it’s a fulfilment of a long-cherished dream,” said Amit Sishodia of Agra Beats travel agency. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix“It’s the architecture, the perspective and the unique backdrop that includes the Yamuna and a whitish skyline that appears to extend to eternity that I find most appealing,” said a city photographer Hemant. Ramesh Chandra Khandelwal, aged 90 plus, Agra’s oldest photographer who runs the more than a century old firm of Priya Lal and Sons, said the Taj Mahal will never lose its fascination and awe.“It is one building with immaculate, Nayaab dimensions, perfect lighting conditions, such variety of angles and contrasts, what else could a photographer want? And if you take into account its history and the romanticism associated with it, who would not like to be photographed with it,” said Khandelwal.  Wildlife photographer Lalit Rajora, who began his journey 18 years ago from the Taj Mahal, still cannot delink himself from the grand Mughal monument.“The grand Taj Mahal, with its enticing beauty, has an eternal fascination for me. Its aesthetic beauty, pristine craftsmanship and grandeur attracts me as a photograph does. As a photographer, when this attraction converted into an unfading romance and passion is difficult to tell. All I can say is that the Taj, under the seasonal hues of the sky enkindles my soul, gives wings to my imagination and meaning to my expression and creativity,” said Rajoria.Vijay Goyal, owner of the Speed Colour Lab, who spent 20-odd years at the Taj Mahal, shooting pictures for tourists and VIPs, said “I recall the statement of a lady tourist long back. She reacted: ‘Oh my god, this looks much better than the photograph I saw back home’.”Goyal said the Taj Mahal faces south. “The sun rises from the east on the left and traverses the whole distance to the right (west) providing different contrasts, shades and colours —never a dull moment. Each angle is different, its symmetry and geometry is perfect and flawless. There is a mix of colours — red sand-stone juxtaposed with white marble and a profusion of green vegetation, while the shades of blue and white. Rare is a man-made structure in the world that provides such a spectacular variety and mind you, there is no artificial lighting anywhere as for the Eiffel Tower or many other monuments.”last_img read more

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Californias new bot disclosure law bans bots from pretending to be human

first_imgLast week, California’s Governor Jerry Brown passed a bill giving rise to a new law that will ban automated accounts, more commonly known as bots, from pretending to be real people in pursuit of selling products or influencing elections. The bill was approved on September 28 and will be effective from July 1, 2019. As per the California Senate, “This bill would, with certain exceptions, make it unlawful for any person to use a bot to communicate or interact with another person in California online with the intent to mislead the other person about its artificial identity for the purpose of knowingly deceiving the person about the content of the communication in order to incentivise a purchase or sale of goods or services in a commercial transaction or to influence a vote in an election.” The law will assist in tackling social media manipulation to determine foreign interference. Bots caused major issues during the 2016 U.S. Presidential elections and have ever since grown to be a menace that platforms like Twitter have been trying to combat. The 2016 U.S. Presidential elections saw Russian-controlled bots playing an active role in manipulating opinions, retweeting Donald Trump’s tweets 470,000 times, and Hillary Clinton’s fewer than 50,000 times. The main aim of this effort is to target bots that spread misinformation. Twitter said that it took down 9.9 million potentially spammy or automated accounts per week in May and has placed warnings on suspicious accounts. Twitter has also announced an update in its work on its “election integrity” project, ahead of the US mid-term elections in November. These include updating its rules regarding fake accounts and sharing stolen information. It said it would now take into account stock avatar photos and copied profile bios in determining whether an account is genuine. Robert Hertzberg, a state senator from California who pushed for the new law forcing bots to disclose their lack of humanity, told The New York Times he was the subject of a bot attack over a bail reform bill. So he decided to fight bots with bots by launching @Bot_Hertzberg in January. As per California law, the account discloses its automated nature. “*I AM A BOT.*” states the account’s Twitter profile. “Automated accounts like mine are made to misinform & exploit users. But unlike most bots, I’m transparent about being a bot.” To know more about this California Senate ’s bill in detail, check out the Senate bill. Read Next Sentiment Analysis of the 2017 US elections on Twitter Facebook, Twitter takes down hundreds of fake accounts with ties to Russia and Iran, suspected to influence the US midterm elections DCLeaks and Guccifer 2.0: How hackers used social engineering to manipulate the 2016 U.S. electionslast_img read more

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Saudi Arabia

first_img Saudi Arabia The United States has the largest refining capacity in the world and is still by far the largest consumer of oil in the world (though China is beginning to catch up), and its refineries require 15 million barrels of oil a day. That means even though, due to the shale revolution, domestic production has dramatically increased to about 8 million barrels, the US still has to import between 7 and 8 million barrels of expensive foreign oil a day. Let’s take a look at who the US buys the imported oil from. (Now that I finally figured out my way around the new Windows 8—which, by the way, really sucks—I can even add some color to my tables.) Canada 2.5–3 Millions of barrels exported to US per day Top 10 Things You Didn’t Know Use Compounds Made from Crude Oil Golf balls Toothpaste Soap Aspirin Life jackets Louis Vuitton knock-offs Guitar strings Shoes Soccer balls Pantyhose 0.8 0.8–1.0 Venezuela Mexico But really, I’ve had a pretty good run. Here is my audited return since January 1, 2012 (green column on the left). 1.2–1.5 While the White House spied on Frau Merkel and Obamacare developed into a slow-moving train wreck, while Syria was saved from all-out war by the Russian bell and the Republicrats fought bitterly about the debt ceiling… something monumental happened that went unnoticed by most of the globe. The US quietly surpassed Saudi Arabia as the biggest oil producer in the world. You read that correctly: “The jump in output from shale plays has led to the second biggest oil boom in history,” stated Reuters on October 15. “U.S. output, which includes natural gas liquids and biofuels, has swelled 3.2 million barrels per day (bpd) since 2009, the fastest expansion in production over a four-year period since a surge in Saudi Arabia’s output from 1970-1974.” After the initial moment of awe, pragmatic readers will surely wonder: Then why isn’t gasoline dirt-cheap in the US? There’s indeed a good explanation why most Americans don’t drive up to the gas pump whistling a happy tune (and it has nothing to do with evil speculators). Let’s start with the demand side of this equation. Crude oil consists of very long chains of carbon atoms. The refineries take the crude and essentially “crack” those long chains of carbon atoms into shorter chains of carbon atoms to make various petroleum products. Some of the products that are made from petroleum may surprise you. Good day in the markets Bad day in the markets 0.3–0.5 Country Kuwait Canada is blue because it is not only friendly with the US, but also has the ability to increase oil production. The other countries are red because they either have decreasing oil production, or the country is not on good terms with the US government, or the production may be at risk for various reasons. The “red countries” all sell oil to the US at higher prices than does Canada. As I said, the US imports about 7 million barrels of oil a day, and our top 5 exporters make up between 5.6 and 6.8 million barrels while the rest is split among other countries. This means that even though the US has significantly increased its oil production in the past five years, a good chunk of oil has to be imported at much higher prices. And higher crude oil prices for refineries means higher prices at the gas pump. But that’s not the only issue: The “new oil” produced from the shale oil fields in the Bakken and Eagle Ford formations isn’t cheap. Both the Bakken and Eagle Ford have been hugely successful, and an average well in either region can produce over 400 barrels of oil per day. That may sound like a lot, but drilling thousands of meters into the ground (both vertically and horizontally), then casing and fracking the well, costs millions of dollars. And the trouble doesn’t end once the well has been drilled: oil and gas production can drop as much as 50% in the first year. Think of it as running on a treadmill—but the incline gets steeper and steeper the longer you run. That’s the current reality of America’s oil production. Now, these areas also have to deal with declining legacy oil production (“legacy” meaning older oil wells that produced before fracking became popular) due to depletion rates. Freeze-offs, and even hurricane season can affect the legacy oil wells’ production decline. As the old wells begin to deplete, they need to be replaced by unconventional wells with horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Even though these new wells provide an initial burst of production, they decline very quickly. That means you need to drill even more wells just to keep up—and the vicious cycle continues. The costs, as you can imagine, are forbiddingly high. Even in known oil-rich regions like the Bakken and Eagle Ford, the all-in cost of extracting a barrel of oil from the ground can cost as much as US$75 per barrel (for comparison, Saudi Arabia can produce oil for as low as US$1 per barrel). To put it in simple terms: cheap oil in North America is a thing of the past. So, the US produces expensive oil and relies on imports of even more expensive oil. And since the refiners need to make money as well, this means higher prices at the pumps. Who loses? The US consumer, of course. What would help lower gas prices? Building more pipelines to deliver cheaper Canadian oil to refineries in the US and decreasing the refineries’ dependence on expensive foreign oil. Until these new and much safer pipelines are built, rail has to pick up the slack. Almost 400,000 railcars full of oil are expected to be shipped in 2013, compared with just 9,500 railcars in 2008, a whopping 41-fold increase. But rail is not the answer. In fact, transporting oil by rail is much more dangerous than transporting it by pipeline. Just last week, we wrote about two recent accidents, one of which claimed 47 lives. Federal and state taxes at every step of the gasoline-making progress make the pain at the pump even worse. The US government already takes more than 60% of the divisible income from every barrel of oil produced… and another 50 cents per gallon at the pump. Then there’s the matter of Obama’s supposed “Green Revolution” and how America would be saved through the use of alternative energies. Obama wrote massive checks to different renewable energy firms that went belly-up, the most famous of them all being solar panel manufacturer Solyndra, whose bankruptcy cost American taxpayers more than $500 million. Obama is also a heavy supporter of ethanol (his home state of Illinois, after all, is the third-largest ethanol-producing state) and has increased the targets for the use of ethanol in transportation. Someone has to pay for all of these subsidies, so why not get the dirty, evil oil companies to pay for them? Keep in mind, though, that the oil companies have enough lobbyists and lawyers to keep the government at bay—so the higher prices will be passed on to the consumers. To sum up why the price of gasoline is so high even though the US is producing so much more oil than before: The high cost of American oil production Even higher costs due to imported (non-Canadian) oil Obama not allowing cheaper Canadian oil to flow to the refineries via pipelines such as the Keystone XL The taxes on crude are used to fund Obama’s green dream—his green-energy “legacy”—and his love for ethanol and the taxes at the pump will not decrease So what does this mean for you, the consumer? You have two options: You can gripe about high gas prices… or you can choose to profit from the situation, no matter how dire. If you’re the former type, so long, and I hope you enjoyed my missive today. If you’re the latter, let’s talk money. Who am I? Well, I kinda look like this guy… I stand by my performance and offer anyone reading this article a guarantee: if you try the Casey Energy Report today and do not think that it’s the absolute best energy newsletter in the business, you get all your money back, no questions asked. I’m not saying I’m perfect (my wife reminds me daily that I’m not ), but I’m willing to put myself out there and offer you a challenge to expand your knowledge and become a better investor. All of my past newsletters, going back to 2006, are up on the Casey website, and I want you to check them out. I have lost money on investments (anyone who says they haven’t is a liar), but I made sure I learned something from every harsh experience. And overall, I’ve made much more than I’ve lost. Our energy portfolio has been delivering +50% gains since January 1, 2012. Right now, I’m the first to publish on what I think is going to send my track record to the moon. I’m on to an investment theme that I believe has the potential to make 10-fold returns for investors who play it right. That theme is the European Energy Renaissance. Doug Casey and I are convinced that new technologies applied in the Old World will bring huge New World profits. But don’t take my word for it—I challenge you to try out my research. Click here to take me up on my 100% money-back guarantee. Additional Links and Reads OPEC Warning of $150 Oil Price If Member Countries Cut Investment (The National) What people often forget about the oil and gas sector is that it is a very capital-intensive business. If companies (or countries) do not consistently re-invest in their production, the amount that comes out of the fields inevitably drops lower and lower. To make matters worse, the demand for oil within petroleum-exporting countries is increasing due to population growth. This means much less will be available for exports, leading to higher oil prices worldwide. Pirates Abduct Two Americans on Oil Ship Off Nigeria Coast (New York Times) Piracy is still a very real concern worldwide when it comes to shipping, adding yet another layer of risk in the global oil and gas trade. Though the phenomenon has died down somewhat in Somalia, we see that piracy is still alive and well in other parts of the world. In the latest event, two American citizens have been abducted in Nigeria. This could be the beginning of a worrying trend of increased piracy around parts of Africa. Final Keystone Review Assesses Potential of Oil-by-Rail Transport (Globe and Mail) US officials are currently considering whether transporting oil by rail is a viable alternative to the pipeline. However, as we have mentioned in previous issues of the CDD, they will soon find that despite the fact that it’s theoretically possible to ship the oil by rail, it will be much more expensive and much less safe. If it comes down to a clash of the lobbyists, however, who knows what could happen?last_img read more

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Study 5000 Is the SelfDriving Car Sweet Spot

first_img 2 min read Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Tom Brant This story originally appeared on PCMag Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. An academic study suggests people are willing to pay just around $5,000 more for fully autonomous cars than typical vehicles. Add to Queue Study: $5,000 Is the Self-Driving Car Sweet Spot Sometimes it’s tough to make sense of the hodgepodge of technologies that currently describe the “self-driving car” buzzword, from lane departure warning systems all the way up to Tesla Autopilot, not to mention industry jargon like “Level 5 automation.”So why not organize autonomous driving technologies by how much people think they’re worth? That’s what a group of economists and engineers tried to do in a paper published in March, CNET reports. The model suggests that on average, Americans are willing to pay a $3,500 premium for a partially automated car and a $4,900 premium for a fully automated one. For comparison, $4,900 for full automation is very similar to what Tesla charges for its most advanced Autopilot, which costs a little over $5,000.The researchers’ model is based on interviews with 27 potential car buyers in New York City and upstate New York. As you might expect, just four of the New York City residents drove a car every day, while all of the 15 upstate New Yorkers commuted via car daily. The two groups perceived similar benefits from self-driving cars, from increased productivity and safety to easier and quicker parking.After crunching the numbers, the researchers found a fairly even segmentation of the demand for automation: about one-third of people are keenly interested and willing to pay $10,000 or more for self-driving features, one-third are ambivalent and the remainder isn’t willing to pay for automation at any price.As the researchers note, however, one of the key problems with such a study is that it’s based on a hypothetical purchase scenario: their study participants weren’t actually buying a car, and even if they were, there are very few models on the market that come with full automation on the level of the Tesla Autopilot.Still, it’s good to establish a peer-reviewed benchmark for how much self-driving tech should cost at this early stage in its development. If it follows the cheapening pattern of most other technology (and the government continues to urge its inclusion in new cars), you might one day be able to do yoga in your Toyota Corolla on the highway for far less than $5,000.center_img May 10, 2017 –shares Self-Driving Cars Image credit: Tesla via PC Mag Next Article News reporter Register Now »last_img read more

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Download Entrepreneur Magazines App for Apple and Android

first_imgEntrepreneur Corporate Communications Download Entrepreneur Magazine’s App for Apple and Android 3 min read Next Article Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business –shares Image credit: Entrepreneur Access the latest issues of Entrepreneur and enjoy the latest news, videos and how-to articles-in one place, on any of your Apple or Android devices, and on your own terms. Entrepreneur Media Corporate Communications Here at Entrepreneur, we are always seeking ways to make it easier for you to get the information you need to boost your business productivity. We know you’re busy—and reading and viewing the latest business advice, trends and tips should be a bright spot in your day.To improve your Entrepreneur experience, we are excited to announce the latest evolution of our mobile app. In one seamless experience, you’ll find an ongoing stream of the latest news, how-to articles, exclusive interviews and videos from Entrepreneur.com. If you’re a magazine subscriber, you can access the newest issue of Entrepreneur magazine, plus your favorite archived issues, in a new mobile-optimized display that auto adjusts across your devices.Download the Entrepreneur magazine app on your iOS or Android device and enjoy:More Content: View the latest news and videos including trending articles, exclusive interviews, infographics, and more from Entrepreneur.com. Plus, access the latest issues of Entrepreneur magazine.Interactive Features: Now use 3D Touch, Interactive Push Notifications and Save for Later, which allows you to save content and read it later offline on your preferred device (syncs user content across multiple devices) for efficient, practical reading.Easy Read, Optimized Display : Enjoy the same fluid reading experience found right here on our website, no matter what you’re reading (our magazine articles are no longer bound to a fixed PDF layout) or what you’re reading on (the presentation will auto adjust to the device and screen orientation).In short, you can now effortlessly enjoy our magazine and digital content—in one place, on any of your Apple or Android devices, and on your own terms.How Does This Work?Our improved app will retain the Entrepreneur magazine name and we will be phasing out the Entrepreneur Daily app. Here’s how you get it:If you use the Entrepreneur Magazine app on iOS or Android: You don’t need to do anything. Depending on your settings, the app update will automatically update on your device or you may be required to activate the update. That’s it!If you use the Entrepreneur Daily app on IOS: You will need to download the new Entrepreneur magazine app. If you use the Entrepreneur Daily app on Android: You will need to download the new Entrepreneur magazine app. Note: While you will have still access to all our great digital-only content, the full digital magazine articles is only available to subscribers. You can easily upgrade within the app.Thank you for your past and continued readership. We look forward to bringing you the business productivity content you need in an easy-to-read format you’ll enjoy.Download the Entrepreneur magazine app on your iOS or Android device now. Add to Queue Register Now » May 26, 2017 Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.last_img read more

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What to Expect at Apple WWDC 2017

first_imgApple This story originally appeared on PCMag 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List June 5, 2017 The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Add to Queue Apple’s annual Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) kicks off Monday in San Jose, where we expect to hear about the new versions of iOS and MacOS, and perhaps One More Thing.We’ll have hands-on coverage from the event floor that day, but for now, here are some of the most prominent rumors and likely announcements making the rounds in the lead up to the keynote.iOS 11 and MacOS 10.13The only true surefire bets for WWDC are new versions of Apple’s mobile and computer software platforms. Most Apple consumers will end up with some or all of the announced features depending on which products they use, and developers are eager to hear what they’ll have to work with, so these will be the stars of the show.Expect the usual updates to core apps like Safari and Mail, with productivity enhancements across the board. Exact feature additions will read more like a wish list since little is known or confirmed currently, but maybe we’ll see announcements like conference calls in FaceTime.Improvements for watchOS and tvOS should also be on display, mainly in the form of more integration into the two main platforms. Increased Siri functionality and unification across the platform might play a big part in the conference, too, especially if the next rumor turns out to be true.Siri speakerApple’s answer to Alexa (and more recently, Google Home) has been long expected, and it seems like this could be the year we finally see one.Whether this is something consumers are itching for remains to be seen — no doubt many interested in a voice assistant have given in and purchased an Amazon Echo or Google Home by now, but the Apple ecosystem could be enough of an incentive to buy. Either way, Bloomberg reports that a Siri speaker has already entered production, so there’s a good chance we see it on Monday.That said, Apple could wait to debut the speaker later in the year, which would be closer to its expected shipping date. If reports are true, it will differentiate itself from the Echo and Google Home with features like virtual surround and, as mentioned, integration with the already ubiquitous lineup of Apple products in millions of homes.MacBook and MacBook Pro refreshesThe standard MacBook and MacBook Pro lines were given some love in 2016 with modest redesigns and, in the case of the Pro, the introduction of the Touch Bar. As such, any announcements about these two lines at WWDC will likely include minor component updates, such as the latest generation Intel processors, rather than major physical or feature changes.There have been some industry rumblings to support this speculation, but it may turn out this traditionally software-focused event saves its MacBook overhaul for a product that might need it a little more attention.New MacBook Air?The Air remains an all-time favorite laptop for many, despite Apple’s relatively infrequent updates to the line. It’s appealing as the cheapest (comparatively) entry in Apple’s laptop line, and did not receive the 2016 refresh its counterparts did. An “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” approach makes some sense here, but the most recent MacBook Air was released in 2015, and if Apple skips another upgrade, 2018 is an awfully long wait in computer time.If it does arrive, expect a USB-C only approach, since even the “thicker” 2016 MacBook dropped the larger standard USB ports. The 1,440-by-900-display resolution would almost definitely receive a boost, since it was already on the low side in 2015, and its great battery life may very well creep even closer to 20 hours.Refined iPad ProIf the existing 9.7- and 12.9-inch iPad Pro models don’t do it for you, how does something in the middle sound? Thanks in part to analyst expectations (as reported by Mac Rumors), there’s plenty of buzz suggesting a 10.5-inch iPad Pro will be revealed at WWDC that similar in size to the 9.7-inch model.The extra screen space will be made possible by much thinner bezels — nearly edge-to-edge — so that Apple can fit a larger screen in a smaller body. In fact, it may replace the 9.7-inch version altogether, since it’s essentially the same size with a bigger display. Odds are this won’t be the only upgrade: The usual component updates like better cameras, a new processor, and maybe a new Apple Pencil would fill out the rest of this announcement. Apply Now » Matthew Buzzicenter_img Next Article Check out the most prominent rumors and speculation about WWDC ahead of Monday’s keynote. Writer Image credit: via PC Mag 4 min read What to Expect at Apple WWDC 2017 –shareslast_img read more

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Facebook May Take Extra Steps to Remove AntiVaccine Misinformation

first_img Facebook is “exploring additional measures” to fight anti-vaccine disinformation, according to Bloomberg. Content discouraging parents from vaccinating their children has been rampant on the site, particularly in Facebook Groups, and may have contributed to a measles outbreak in Washington State. That caught the attention of U.S. Representative Adam Schiff, who wrote a letter to Facebook and Google asking them to address the problem.Schiff noted that Facebook is surfacing and recommending messages that may pose a threat to public health. For instance, the Guardian recently reported that Facebook was accepting and promoting ads from anti-vax groups. “Repetition of information, even if false, can often be mistaken for accuracy,” he wrote. “The algorithms which power these services are not designed to distinguish quality information from misinformation.”Facebook said that it’s “exploring additional measures to best combat the problem,” including “reducing or removing this type of content from recommendations, including ‘Groups You Should Join,’ and demoting it in search results, while also ensuring that higher quality and more authoritative information is available.”The resurgence of measles is of serious concern, with extended outbreaks occurring across regions, and particularly in countries that had achieved, or were close to achieving measles elimination.Google recently said YouTube would restrict video recommendations that “could misinform users in harmful ways,” including anti-vaccine videos. It also said recently that would provide links alongside videos on “historical and scientific topics that have often been subject to misinformation.” Until recently, anti-vax videos topped results for “vaccine” searches, but the top results now appear to be from sites like Last Week Tonight attempting to dispel vaccination myths. However, Robert F. Kennedy’s widely debunked anti-vax documentary is still in the top 10.The CDC notes that vaccines have been proven safe and effective and only result in minor side effects. However, avoiding them can put not just your own children but others at risk, particularly small babies who have yet to be inoculated. “Without urgent efforts to increase vaccination coverage … we risk losing decades of progress in protecting children and communities,” said Unicef’s Dr. Soumya Swaminathan. Add to Queue 2 min read Next Article Register Now » –shares Image credit: Fred Tanneau | Getty Images via engadget Facebook Steve Dent February 15, 2019 Facebook May Take Extra Steps to Remove Anti-Vaccine Misinformation Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. This story originally appeared on Engadget Conspiracy theories on the site may have contributed to a measles outbreak. Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Businesslast_img read more

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First Edition December 20 2013

first_imgFirst Edition: December 20, 2013 Today’s headlines include reports about the action taken by the administration to relax a health law requirement just four days before the deadline.  Kaiser Health News: Expect To Pay More For Your Employer-Sponsored Health Care Next YearKaiser Health News staff writer Julie Appleby, working in collaboration with USA Today, reports: “If you’re one of the 150 million Americans who get health insurance through your job, prepare to pay more. The new year will likely bring higher deductibles and co-payments, penalties for not joining wellness programs and smaller employer contributions toward family coverage. While some workers and employers blame the federal health law for those changes, benefit experts say the law is mainly accelerating trends that predate it” (Appleby, 12/20). Read the story.Kaiser Health News: A Reader Asks: Will My Son Overseas Have To Buy A U.S. Plan?Kaiser Health News consumer columnist Michelle Andrews answers this readers’ question (12/20). Read her response.Kaiser Health News: Capsules: Website Repairs Have Not Bolstered Support For The Health Law, Poll Finds; After Exposure, Security Holes Sealed In Minnesota’s Health ExchangeNow on Kaiser Health News’ blog, Jordan Rau reports on a new tracking poll about the health law: “Improvements in the government’s insurance Web portal have not translated into stronger public support for the health law, a new poll shows. Nearly half of the public views the law unfavorably this month, while only a third likes it. That’s about the same as in November, when public opinion plummeted after the technologically troubled start of the health care marketplaces, according to the poll from the Kaiser Family Foundation” (Rau, 12/20). Also on the blog, Minnesota Public Radio’s Elizabeth Stawicki reports on Minnesota’s health exchange: “A security flaw has been fixed on MNsure, Minnesota’s health insurance marketplace — one that had left users vulnerable to data interception by hackers. The fix follows an MPR story last week and a meeting Monday between forensic analyst Mark Lanterman and the state’s chief information security officer, Chris Buse. At the meeting, Lanterman explained how he discovered the flaw and how the state could resolve the problem” (Stawicki, 12/19). Check out what else is new on the blog.The New York Times: Another Rule In Health Law Is Scaled BackMillions of people facing the cancellation of health insurance policies will be allowed to buy catastrophic coverage and will be exempt from penalties if they go without insurance next year, the White House said Thursday night (Pear, 12/19).Los Angeles Times: Administration Opens First Hole In Health Law MandateThe Obama administration has opened a small, but potentially important, hole in a key requirement of the new healthcare law, letting some people who have had insurance policies cancelled avoid the requirement to buy coverage next year. The change, announced Thursday night in a letter that Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius sent to a group of senators, marks the first exception the administration has allowed to the law’s so-called individual mandate (Lauter, 12/19).The Washington Post: Obama Administration Relaxes Rules Of Health-Care Law Four Days Before DeadlineThe rule change was issued in a bulletin from the Department of Health and Human Services. It is the second major response by the Obama administration to a public and political furor that erupted in the fall when several million people who bought their own insurance began to receive notices that their policies were being canceled because they fell short of new benefit standards. The cancellations prompted complaints that President Obama had reneged on an oft-repeated promise that, under the Affordable Care Act, people who like their health plans could keep them (Goldstein, 12/19).The Associated Press/Washington Post: Options Set For Those Lacking New Health CoverageUnder another stopgap option Sebelius announced Thursday, those whose plans were canceled will be able to buy a bare-bones catastrophic plan regardless of their age. Such plans had been intended for those under 30. A dedicated hotline for people who got cancellations, 1-866-837-0677, is being set up by the Health and Human Services Department as part of the effort to head off more bad news coming from the chaotic rollout of President Barack Obama’s health care law (12/20).The Wall Street Journal: White House Will Allow Some To Buy Catastrophic Health PlansHealth and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius told a group of six senators in a letter that people whose policies had been canceled because of new requirements under the Affordable Care Act would be allowed to purchase “catastrophic” plans. Those plans previously had been restricted under the new law to people under the age of 30 or those who qualified for a set of specific hardship exemptions (Radnofsky, 12/19).The Associated Press/Washington Post: Overhaul Website Problems May Trigger Price HikesProblems with the government’s main health care overhaul website carry a bigger risk than frequent crashes: Higher prices could follow for many Americans if technical troubles scare off young people. The government has touted recent improvements to HeathCare.gov, which millions of Americans are expected to use to sign up for coverage. But enrollment still lags far behind projections, and that has triggered worries that legions of potential customers in their 20s and 30s might not sign up. If that happens — and older, sicker people continue to register in larger numbers — insurers might have to raise future prices to address the imbalance (12/19).The Wall Street Journal: Last-Minute Health-Site Enrollment Proves A Hard SellInsurers pressing for last-minute enrollees under the health-care law say they are running into a worrisome trend: Customers who were put off by the insurance marketplaces’ early troubles are proving hard sells. Many people thwarted by the technical problems of HealthCare.gov are reluctant to try again, citing frustration with the federal site, web-security concerns and the pressure of the holidays, several insurers say (Martin and Weaver, 12/19).Politico: White House Broadens Obamacare ExemptionsMillions of Americans who had their health plans cancelled will be exempt from the Obamacare individual mandate, the administration said Thursday — a surprise move that comes just before Monday’s deadline to sign up for coverage starting Jan. 1. The administration also said people who had their plans cancelled could get a scaled-back catastrophic plan, which has more limited benefits than those included in other Obamacare health plans. The move prompted sharp criticism from Republicans and concern from the insurance industry that another last-minute change would disrupt coverage and lead to tumult in the new marketplaces (Haberkorn and Budoff Brown, 12/20).Los Angeles Times: Health Insurance Cancellation Notices Leave 500,000 UncoveredFewer than 500,000 people who received health insurance cancellation notices have not yet signed up for new coverage, Obama administration officials said Thursday. The senior administration officials said they had arrived at the estimate over weeks of contacting insurers and combing through the administration’s own enrollment data (Hennessey, 12/19).The Associated Press/Washington Post: 500K With Canceled Health Plans Lack CoverageThe cancellations have become a nagging problem for the White House. President Barack Obama repeatedly promised that people who liked their insurance could keep it under the new health law (12/19).Los Angeles Times: State Healthcare Exchange Reports Share Increase In EnrollmentCalifornia’s health insurance exchange reported sharply higher enrollment ahead of Monday’s sign-up deadline for Jan. 1 coverage, amid mounting criticism over how it handles consumer privacy. The Covered California exchange said Thursday that 53,510 people enrolled in health plans over a three-day period this week, culminating with more than 20,000 people picking an insurance company on Wednesday alone. Last week, about 15,000 people were enrolling daily (Terhune, 12/19).The Washington Post: Gansler: Maryland’s Health Exchange Reminds Him Of ‘Saturday Night Live’ SketchGansler, a Democratic candidate for governor, has been highly critical of the role played by his rival, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown (D), in overseeing the implementation of the federal health care law in Maryland. Brown co-chairs a council that has guided reforms in the state but has said he was not involved in the day-to-day operations of the exchange (Wagner, 12/19).The New York Times: With Obama Now In Need, Aides Put Off Their ExitsIn any White House, the end of the year typically brings staff changes, especially as exhaustion sets in during the later years of an administration. But the Obama team has been as tested as any in decades: by economic calamity, the winding down of two wars, an expansive domestic agenda, various international crises and, lately, the trouble-filled execution of the most ambitious health care program since Medicare. Controversy over the health care law has helped drive Mr. Obama’s approval ratings to new lows, a trend that the White House is scrambling to reverse. Longtime aides who stayed with the president into the second term — thinking that they would remain for months or a year to help with the transition — are now feeling pressured to extend their service, officials said (Calmes, 12/19).Politico: For Obamacare Boosters, All Memes Are Good MemesWhen it comes to marketing Obamacare, all memes are good memes. So say progressive activists and Democratic strategists, pushing back against a wave of fresh criticism that mocks their youth outreach efforts as somewhere between slightly awkward and totally tone-deaf (Tau, 12/19).Politico: ‘Tis The Season For Health And TaxesFirms like Jackson Hewitt and H&R Block are offering health insurance checkups during the 2014 tax preparation season to explain Obamacare options to their customers, many of whom will qualify for federal tax credits to help afford health coverage but may not know it. The firms are partnering with web insurance brokers who will help people sign up as they’re filing their taxes — which in turn gives them cash on hand from tax refunds to help them pay their share of the premiums (Cunningham, 12/19).USA Today: Study: Routine Costs, Not Law, Lead To Most New IncreasesRoutine costs, not requirements of the Affordable Care Act, contributed to the majority of health insurance rate increases in the last year, a new study released Thursday shows. “It wasn’t driven by utilization of the services, but the unit costs,” said Mike McCue, lead author of the study by The Commonwealth Fund, a nonprofit group devoted to improving health services for Americans. “That will continue to be a major driver moving forward — trying to control those medical expenses — if they want to remain profitable” (Kennedy, 12/19).The Wall Street Journal: Medicare Auditors Urged To Check Doctors’ Total Billing To Prevent FraudFlagging doctors who bill more than $3 million a year could help prevent overbilling and save Medicare millions of dollars each year, said the report set to be released Friday by the inspector general at the Department of Health and Human Services. Obama administration officials said they were considering implementing the report’s suggestions as part of efforts to root out Medicare fraud (Schatz, 12/20).NPR: Poll: Americans Favor Age Restrictions On Morning-After PillEmergency contraception has been embroiled in controversy pretty much from the start. But this year the legal wrangling over who can buy the Plan B One-Step morning-after pill without a prescription came to an end. A federal judge in New York ruled in April that the morning-after pill also had to be made available over the counter to girls 16 and under (Hensley, 12/19).The New York Times: Tackling A Racial Gap In Breast Cancer SurvivalLike many other African-American women in Memphis and around the country, Ms. Reid learned about her breast cancer after it had already reached an advanced stage, making it difficult to treat and reducing her odds of survival. Her story reflects one of the most troubling disparities in American health care. Despite 20 years of pink ribbon awareness campaigns and numerous advances in medical treatment that have sharply improved survival rates for women with breast cancer in the United States, the vast majority of those gains have largely bypassed black women (Parker-Pope, 12/20).Los Angeles Times: Steinberg Seeks To Restore Mental Health Funds For CriminalsSenate leader Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento) said Thursday that he will seek to restore a state program that funded county services for mentally ill people who run afoul of the law. After a decade of state funding, the Mentally Ill Offender Crime Reduction Grants ceased in 2008 due to budget cuts. Steinberg wants to restore funding, starting with $50 million in the next budget year. But that money is contingent on whether Gov. Jerry Brown receives a delay in a federal court order to reduce state prison crowding (St. John, 12/19).Check out all of Kaiser Health News’ e-mail options including First Edition and Breaking News alerts on our Subscriptions page. This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more

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Home blood pressure measurements can be used to diagnose hypertension in US

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 29 2018Blood pressure readings of 130/80 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) or higher taken at home can be used to diagnose hypertension in white, black and Hispanic U.S. adults, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.”Until now, recommendations for diagnosing high blood pressure with measurements done at home were primarily from Japanese and European studies,” said Wanpen Vongpatanasin, M.D., study author, professor of medicine and hypertension director at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. “We didn’t know if these recommendations actually applied to U.S. adults.”Researchers analyzed large multi-ethnic studies that compared home blood pressure to clinic measurements of primarily young and middle-aged adults in Dallas, Texas and Durham, North Carolina. In 420 participants in the North Carolina clinic, high blood pressure readings (130/80) were confirmed with similar readings at home. In 3,132 participants in the Dallas study, researchers determined risks of stroke, heart attack and death associated with a clinic systolic blood pressure reading of 130 mm Hg. During the 11-year follow up, researchers also determined that people with high blood pressure levels measured at home had the same heart disease risk as people with similar levels measured by medical professionals.Related StoriesBlood pressure self-monitoring can help patients with hypertension to stick with exercise programMathematical model helps quantify metastatic cell behaviorDon’t ignore diastolic blood pressure values, say researchersVongpatanasin added that the findings correlate with the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology 2017 blood pressure guideline.”It’s important to measure blood pressure at home because clinic readings might not reflect a person’s true blood pressure. Some people have higher readings in the clinic because of the ‘white coat’ phenomenon, while studies have shown that others – especially, blacks – have lower blood pressure readings in the clinic than at home,” she said.This study included adults aged 30 to 65 years old from two U.S. cities, so the findings might not apply to younger or older people or adults in different geographical areas, she said.With the definition of high blood pressure set at 130/80 mm Hg, nearly half (46 percent) of U.S. adults have high blood pressure. Researchers have found that at least 30 percent to 45 percent of U.S. adults with hypertension monitor their blood pressure at home.The American Heart Association recommends consumers follow the proper technique when measuring blood pressure: be still and rest quietly for at least 5 minutes before measurements; avoid caffeine or cigarettes in the half hour before your reading; keep both feet flat on the floor; and avoid talking during the test. At least two readings should be taken one minute apart in the morning before taking medications and in the evening before eating. Ideally, blood pressure readings should be taken during one week beginning a few weeks after a change in the treatment regimen and during the week before a doctor’s visit. Source:https://newsroom.heart.org/news/home-monitoring-confirms-clinic-diagnosis-of-high-blood-pressure?preview=3656last_img read more

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Special cameras limit radiation while delivering images vital for patient health

first_imgReports show that in Germany in 2013, although CT scans only represented 7 % of all X-rays performed, they conveyed 60 % of the radiation that patients received. We built several prototype cameras. As an alternative to CT, they enable 3D X-ray imagines in very few exposures, meaning less radiation for the patient.”Marta Fajardo, project coordinator and assistant professor at the Instituto Superior Técnico in Lisbon, Portugal New perspective on 3D imagingCT scans make images by taking thousands of flat, two-dimensional photos in order to reconstruct a 3D image. The problem is that each photo injects ionizing radiation into the patient. As photos multiply, radiation levels rise.To counter this, VOXEL’s breakthrough idea was to adapt a technique called plenoptic imaging to X-ray radiation. Plenoptic cameras capture information about the direction that light rays, including X-rays, are traveling in space, as opposed to a normal camera that captures only light intensity.Related StoriesStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskSubclinical cardiovascular disease linked to higher risk of falling in older adultsNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerBecause researchers can use the information about light direction captured by plenoptic cameras to reconstruct 3D images, there is no need to take thousands of 2D photos. Images of important structures like blood vessels can be made from a single exposure, lowering the average radiation dose significantly.A major part of the work was using the right algorithms to manipulate the captured information. ‘First, we demonstrated that plenoptic imagining is mathematically equivalent to a limited-angle tomography problem,’ Fajardo says. ‘Then we could simply reformat plenoptic imaging as tomography data and apply image reconstruction algorithms to obtain much better images.’But the biggest challenge remained engineering the cameras. ‘The higher the photon energy, the harder it is to manufacture the optics for a plenoptic camera,’ she says. ‘You need X-rays of different energies for different tasks.’ The solution was to develop one camera prototype that used lower-energy X-rays for tiny structures like cells and another that used higher-energy X-rays for larger objects, such as small animals or human organs.Less radiation, healthier patientsWhile Fajardo is encouraged by the project’s results, work remains to be done. ‘The low-energy X-ray camera belongs to a niche market,’ she explains. ‘But the high-energy X-ray prototype has huge medical potential, although it still requires some development.’Results from the project, which was awarded a Future Emerging Technologies grant, will soon be submitted for publication in the international science journal Nature Photonics. Source:European Commission Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jul 15 2019CT scans have revolutionized the fight against human illness by creating three-dimensional images of the body’s inner workings. Such scans, however, can deliver high doses of radiation. Now EU-funded researchers have built special cameras that limit radiation while delivering images vital for patient health.Doctors have used computed tomography scans, or CT scans, to greatly improve the diagnosis and treatment of illnesses such as cancer and cardiovascular disease. But a major problem limits their use: they deliver high doses of radiation that can harm patients nearly as much as their ailment.Enter the EU-funded VOXEL project which set out to develop an innovative way to create three-dimensional imaging. The result is special cameras that can deliver 3D images but without the high doses of radiation.last_img read more

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