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It’s Time to Plan for Electric Vehicles on the Grid

first_imgPrograms and incentives drive booming market growthIn the U.S., a variety of state and federal tax incentives, other local benefits, and deployment targets are supporting double-digit growth rates in EV adoption and charging-station installation:California aims to have 1.5 million EVs on the road by 2025 — a more than 600% increase over the roughly 200,000 EVs it has today — along with the supporting charging infrastructure. And the three big investor-owned utilities in California are developing programs to radically increase the number of charging stations available in their territories, under a variety of innovative programs.Nine states have followed suit on California’s Zero Emissions Vehicles program, which sets goals for manufacturers to sell EVs. Several states have begun to transition their fleets of state vehicles over to EVs.The Drive Clean Seattle program aims to increase EV adoption by 400% and get 15,000 EVs on the road in the city by 2025, as well as to triple the number of publicly available fast chargers.The City of Indianapolis intends to replace its entire gasoline-powered fleet with EVs by 2025. The City of Houston now has one-quarter of its fleet plugged in. New York City plans to create the largest municipal electric vehicle fleet in the country.Group purchase programs in Colorado for Nissan Leafs quadrupled sales in Boulder, and increased sales by a factor of six in northern Colorado.So, although EVs are a small part of the fleet (0.16%) and of new vehicle sales (0.7%) in the U.S. now, watch out: Their adoption could follow the path of other disruptive technologies, like cell phones and internet access, and become ubiquitous in an astonishingly short time.This is particularly likely as the world begins making real strides toward its climate change targets. Bloomberg New Energy Finance estimates that electric vehicles could account for 35% of all new vehicle sales worldwide by 2040, as the price of long-range EVs falls to less than $22,000 and drivers begin to appreciate how much cheaper they are to drive than internal combustion vehicles. BY CHRIS NELDERIf you think electric vehicles are still a niche technology, think again. The International Energy Agency (IEA) estimates that more than 1 million electric vehicles (EVs) were on the road in 2015, including 400,000 in the United States. In order to limit global warming to 2 C° or less, the agency says the world will need 150 million EVs by 2030 and 1 billion by 2050, implying a 21% compound annual growth rate from now until 2050.India is considering a state-financed plan that would let drivers buy EVs for zero money down, then pay for the vehicles out of gasoline savings. The plan aims to transition India’s entire fleet to electric vehicles by 2030.China also is aiming to have a fully electrified fleet, eventually, and has a target of putting 5 million battery-electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles on the road by 2020. EV sales there quadrupled to more than 247,000 last year, more than double the 115,000 sold in the U.S.EVs already have a larger market share in Norway, at 17%, than anywhere else in the world, and although the country is not banning the sale of gasoline and diesel vehicles, as recent reports suggested, it is formulating targets for zero-emission vehicles in order to reach climate goals. RELATED ARTICLES How will your decisions help or hamper the grid of the future?But the EV revolution will need more than utilities and regulators to support it; many of us have important roles to play. A new report from RMI’s Electricity Innovation Lab (eLab), Electric Vehicles as Distributed Energy Resources, developed in conjunction with the Regulatory Assistance Project and San Diego Gas and Electric, identifies best practices for elected officials, vehicle manufacturers, regulators, utilities, and other stakeholders, as well as important considerations for consumers and consumer advocates.Among other things, we have to ensure that charging stations are installed and available at the right time and place for drivers to use them. But what that means may vary by state and utility grid. We have to ensure that EVs are affordable and practical for the broadest possible cross section of drivers, as a matter of social equity. And we need to influence, with increasing precision, where and when EVs are charged through a combination of partnerships, incentives, and market structures. In its early stages, the interesting challenges and opportunities related to vehicle grid integration will be local or even hyperlocal, at the scales where grid-related issues will first emerge.By working together and managing EV charging so that it happens at the right times and places, EVs can be integrated into the electricity system in ways that deliver net benefits to utility customers, shareholders, vehicle owners, and society at large. EVs currently have a 10% market share in the Netherlands, which is discussing the possibility of banning the sale of gasoline vehicles and only allowing EV sales by 2025. Can We Power Our Car With the Sun?How Green Is Your Car? As Electric Cars Stall, A Move to Greener Trucks and BusesWill Self-Driving Cars Save Energy?The Downside of Low Gas PricesElectric Vehicles Hit a Pothole in CaliforniaNew Life for Old Electric Vehicle BatteriesPlan for California Vehicle Charging Stations on HoldMinnesota OKs Special Rates for Electric VehiclesAn Indiana Utility Offers Free Car ChargesA Charger in Every GarageMore Tips for Improving MileageHouses Versus CarsUsing Parked Electric Cars For Peak ShavingRunning Our House on Prius Power Utilities: Be preparedIf utilities and their regulators are not prepared for such a rapid expansion of the EV fleet, it could have negative effects on the grid. The life of grid infrastructure components could be shortened and greater investment in peak capacity could be required, making the grid less efficient, increasing the unit costs of electricity for all consumers, inhibiting the integration of renewables, increasing grid power emissions, and making the grid less stable.But if utilities and regulators anticipate rapid EV growth and plan accordingly by implementing the right incentives and tariff structures, EVs could become an incredibly valuable grid asset, and actually reduce the cost of electricity by helping to optimize the grid so that it operates more efficiently.EVs can enable the growth of wind and solar on the grid by absorbing their output when it is greatest, helping utilities avoid new investment in grid infrastructure, reducing electricity and transportation costs, reducing petroleum consumption and emissions, improving energy security, and supplying ancillary services to the grid, such as frequency regulation and power factor correction.Utilities should prepare for a rapid adoption of EVs for another reason: avoiding undue stress on the electricity distribution network. EVs with high-capacity batteries, such as the 30 kWh 2016 Nissan Leaf, can consume as much electricity as the average U.S. residence consumes in a day. In order to avoid overloading distribution grid components, utilities will need to either invest in expensive grid upgrades or offer electricity rate structures that encourage vehicle owners to recharge their vehicles when grid power demand is low. Managing charging patterns is already important for neighborhoods with more than three or four EVs in places such as San Diego and Silicon Valley. Chris Nelder is a manager with the Rocky Mountain Institute’s electricity practice. This post originally appeared at the RMI Outlet.last_img read more

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How to See the Competitive Game of Sales in Slow Motion

first_img Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Now My brother-in-law is a football coach. His oldest son started as a quarterback in his freshman year of high school, and he started as a safety on defense. He was the best player on the field and eventually played for Ohio State. My brother-in-law’s youngest son is now starting as quarterback for the junior varsity team at his high school. On Saturday, he ran for five touchdowns, beating a team that was supposed to beat his team badly. I asked my brother-in-law whether the game moves slower for his son than other kids on the field, and he assured me it does move slower.The game moves slower for my nephew because he has a deeper understanding of the game. He understands the offensive plays better than most because his father is a football coach. He’s grown up watching and listening to his Dad explain and teach the plays, and he has sat through the film reviews on Saturday mornings from the time he was a small child. Even though my nephew is very young, his Dad has educated him to read a defense. His knowledge and experience make the game move slower for him.If you want the great game of sales to move slower, allowing you to anticipate problems, challenges, and obstacles, and overcome them, you have to acquire a deeper knowledge of your craft, an education that provides you with an advantage.You Can’t Learn to Sell from Reading a BookYou cannot learn to sell by reading a book. You can’t learn to sell by reading many books on sales. You can, however, learn to sell a lot better by reading books. But not only from reading books, but also from training, development, and coaching.When Neil Rackham wrote SPIN Selling in 1988, salespeople were taught to ask two kinds of questions, open-ended questions that required their prospects to provide information, and closed-ended questions that required a yes or no answer. The close-ended questions being used to teach salespeople to tie-down their prospects and close them. Rackham’s work provided a framework that included situational questions, problem questions, implication questions, and need-payoff questions. At that time, salespeople asked mostly situational and problem questions. No one had described the value of implication questions, or uncovering the motivation for change or the consequences of doing nothing.Imagine two salespeople competing for the same client. One asks questions to understand the situation and the problem the client is experiencing, while the other asks questions about the implication of their issues and the consequences of maintaining the status quo. I would argue the game is slower for the second salesperson.In 1970, Mack Hanan wrote a book titled Consultative Selling. There may not be a book that was so far ahead of the curve as it pertains to selling effectively. Hanan’s primary framework in the book is something he called a “PIP,” an acronym for a Profit Improvement Plan. The general concept was to show your client how what you were selling them would contribute to higher profits.Maybe because every new salesperson’s knowledge base starts at zero, much of what Hanan taught is unknown to most salespeople. The game moves very fast for those who believe they lose deals on price, and most salespeople still struggle to justify the more significant investment they need their clients to make to produce better results. The game moves much slower when you know how to position your higher price and relate it to lower costs, i.e., higher profitability.Without the conceptual frameworks, you can’t make sense of what you are seeing. You can’t learn to sell by reading a book on sales, but you sure as hell can learn to sell better.Process, Methodologies, and JourneysIf you want the game to slow down for you, you need to deepen your understanding of the sales process, particularly the outcomes you need at each stage of the sales conversation and the obstacles to obtaining them. A sales process provides you with an understanding of where you are in space, without which you can quickly lose your orientation. You underestimate the value of the sales process when you believe it is just a way for your sales leaders to forecast. I believe the sales conversation is now non-linear, but that will mean nothing to you if you aren’t aware of the linear process I am referring to, that idea isn’t useful to you.Both Rackham and Hanan’s work are both methodologies. Rackham’s work is a methodology for asking questions to uncover dissatisfaction and the implications of the problems and challenges your client is facing. Hanan’s work is a methodology for positioning your offering and compelling change. These methodologies provide you guidance on how to play the game. When you have access to structures that allow you to see something and understand the choices available to you, you are moving faster than the game–and faster than your competition.Now, there is much work being done on the buyer’s journey, even if the application of business-to-consumer journeys used are inadequate for complex, business-to-business sales. Understanding where the stakeholders are in their buying process provides you with a better understanding of what conversations they will find valuable. When you know where they are now, you are better prepared to serve them.Your processes, methodologies, and frameworks for understanding your buyers all provide you with conceptual frameworks that can shift the game into slow motion for you, allowing you to see what’s coming and make effective choices.My ConstructsAs of this writing, I have written three books.The first book, The Only Sales Guide You’ll Ever Need, is a competency model for salespeople. The framework in that book provides you with a way of looking at your personal and professional development.My second book, The Lost Art of Closing: Winning the 10 Commitments That Drive Sales, is a methodology for gaining the commitments you need to control the process and help your clients obtain better results.The third book, Eat Their Lunch: Winning Customers Away from Your Competition, is the most strategic, providing several conceptual frameworks, including Level 4 Value Creation, my approach to starting conversations at the strategic level and compelling change. That book also includes a practical and tactical framework for building consensus, something that can slow the game tremendously when used well.If you want the sales game to slow down for you, you have to speed up your acquisition of the concepts, strategies, and tactics that will provide you with the ability to make sense of what you are seeing.last_img read more

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Lanka need to use home advantage against Australia

first_imgFor all that the World Cup is billed to be, there are a few contests that carry their own baggage, irrespective of the forum and format. Sri Lanka and Australia contests are played on a tinder box ready to burst into action any moment.Sri Lanka’s Lasith Malinga during a training sessionThe two teams face off at the Premadasa Stadium on Saturday in a Group A match that will have a bearing on the quarter-final line-up and also prove how the teams have coped with recent off-field ‘incidents’. Players from both teams have been accused, directly or indirectly, of indulging in fixing in this World Cup. If Australian openers Brad Haddin and Shane Watson were reportedly under the lens of the ICC anti-corruption unit for unusually slow batting against Zimbabwe during a game in Ahmedabad, a local channel in Sri Lanka accused Mahela Jayawardene and Thilan Samaraweera of throwing a match against Pakistan. Both episodes have since died down but such accusations don’t leave the players’ mind so easily. These incidents have added spice to an already fiery encounter, given what happened in the 1996 World Cup.That time, Australia and West Indies refused to tour Sri Lanka following bomb blasts in Colombo and the hosts entered the quarter-finals even before playing a single game. The Sri Lankans then had a dream run to the final, where they, ironically, met the Aussie and beat them in the final at Lahore.But when the teams enter the ground on Saturday, the baggages will have to be left in the dressing rooms. Current form and team balance will matter and this is where the difference between the two teams has narrowed down. The Australian team of the previous World Cups were so far ahead of the competition, most teams lost a large part of the battle even before the toss. But the current Australian side has a few shortcomings which Krejza – and will rely on their pace attack.advertisementBut it’s not a bad attack to rely on. Brett Lee, Shaun Tait and Mitchell Johnson form one of the fastest and most potent pace battery seen in recent times. A lot of sides have opened the bowling with spinners this World Cup but teams can expect a barrage of thunderbolts from the Aussies first up. On the batting front, the form of Watson and Clarke will be of comfort. Skipper Ponting is slowly returning to form and fitness and will be the backbone of the line-up. The Sri Lankans have a few niggling concerns in their batting. Their middle order was exposed by Pakistan last Saturday and with a lethal pace attack to contend with, any frailties will be out in the open.They, however, have a trump card up their sleeve in paceman Lasith Malinga. He played his first game of this World Cup against Kenya and picked up a hat-trick and will be expected to give the initial breakthroughs on Saturday.The wicket at the Premadasa isn’t the minefield it used to be under lights, so chasing won’t be disadvantage. But with the overcast conditions seen over the past few days, the pacers could have a say in the game. There is very little separating the two teams. The Aussies have a proud record in ICC tournaments and Sri Lanka make the best possible use of home conditions. It could well turn out to be a case of who blinks first. the Sri Lankans know can be exploited.With Michael Hussey out of their side, the ability of their batting lineup to handle the Lankan spin attack will be severely tested. Skipper Ricky Ponting, Shane Watson and Michael Clarke will be the best bet against an attack which might have three spinners in Muttiah Muralitharan, Ajantha Mendis and Rangana Herath.The defending champions have a spinner with modest abilities – Jason Krejza – and will rely on their pace attack. But it’s not a bad attack to rely on. Brett Lee, Shaun Tait and Mitchell Johnson form one of the fastest and most potent pace battery seen in recent times. A lot of sides have opened the bowling with spinners this World Cup but teams can expect a barrage of thunderbolts from the Aussies first up. On the batting front, the form of Watson and Clarke will be of comfort. Skipper Ponting is slowly returning to form and fitness and will be the backbone of the line-up.The Sri Lankans have a few niggling concerns in their batting. Their middle order was exposed by Pakistan last Saturday and with a lethal pace attack to contend with, any frailties will be out in the open.advertisementThey, however, have a trump card up their sleeve in paceman Lasith Malinga. He played his first game of this World Cup against Kenya and picked up a hat-trick and will be expected to give the initial breakthroughs on Saturday.The wicket at the Premadasa isn’t the minefield it used to be under lights, so chasing won’t be disadvantage. But with the overcast conditions seen over the past few days, the pacers could have a say in the game. There is very little separating the two teams. The Aussies have a proud record in ICC tournaments and Sri Lanka make the best possible use of home conditions. It could well turn out to be a case of who blinks first.last_img read more

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Asian Games: Indian boxers Thapa, Kuldeep in quarters

first_imgIndian boxers Shiva Thapa and Kuldeep Singh advanced to the quarterfinals while Akhil Kumar and Amritpreet Singh were knocked out of their respective categories in the 17th Asian Games at Seonhak Gymnasium on Friday.Thapa was adjudged the winner against Nadir of Pakistan by technical knockout due to injury in the round of 16 bout in the bantamweight (56kg) section . The 20-year-old took just a minute and five seconds, recording a round one TKO-I win over the Pakistani fighter. He will face Filipino Mario Fernandez in the quarterfinal slated for Tuesday.In the men’s light heavyweight (81kg) category, Kuldeep defeated Thongkrathok Anavat of Thailand by a split decision, winning 2-1 to make it to the quarters. He will next take on Iran’s Ehsan Rouzbahani on Monday.Later in the day, comeback man Akhil lost his lightweight (60kg) round of 16 match, going down 1-2 in a split decision against Charly Suarez of the Philippines’ in a tight contest that could have gone either way. Akhil took the lead after winning the first round but Suarez came back strongly to clinch the next two rounds to seal the contest in his favour. The last-eight round of this category will be held Oct 29.Amritpreet Singh’s, heavy weight (91kg) category, loss by a split decision against South Korea’s Namhyeong Park was similar to Akhil’s. Amritpreet started the contest positively bagging the first round in a split decision. But then his aggressiveness dipped as Park clawed back in the fight, bagging the bout in a split decision. The quarter-finals of this event will be held on Tuesday.advertisementlast_img read more

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RollsRoyce Finferries to Optimise Ship Safety Efficiency

first_imgzoomImage Courtesy: Rolls-Royce UK-based Rolls-Royce and Finnish shipowner Finferries will jointly develop strategies and solutions to optimise the safety and efficiency of marine operations.This will be undertaken through developing the technology for decision supporting systems, the companies informed, adding that they would also demonstrate remote and autonomous ferry operations.Under the collaboration agreement, the parties said their key focus will be to consider a new research project, called SVAN (Safer Vessel with Autonomous Navigation), whereby Rolls-Royce and Finferries will look to implement the findings from the Advanced Autonomous Waterborne Applications (AAWA) research project, which formally ended in late 2017.Funded by Business Finland, AAWA brought together a number of stakeholders from a myriad of shipping industry sectors to research the commercial and technical viability of a next generation of advanced ship solutions. Both Rolls-Royce and Finferries were involved in the project.“This new collaboration agreement could take safer, cleaner shipping to the next level. Rolls-Royce will develop solutions to enhance the safety and efficiency of marine operations in the ferry sector, which will be demonstrated in the test platform provided by Finferries,” Karno Tenovuo, Senior Vice President, Rolls-Royce Ship Intelligence, said.last_img read more

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