Tag: 夜上海

HARPS COME FROM BEHIND TWICE TO SNATCH A DESERVED DRAW AGAINST UCD

first_imgFinn Harps maintained their unbeaten run to their league campaign with an entertaining 2-2 with the students of UCD at Belfield.Tagbo was on the scoresheet again for Harps. Pic by Gary Foy, newsandsportfilesHarps were forced to come from behind on two occasions against the College boys in a blustery yet very entertaining night in south Dublin.Harps found themselves behind after 17 minutes when Mick Leahy headed home from a corner. Harps protested the ball had not crossed the line when it was partially cleared but referee Ben Connolly signalled for a goal.But just five minutes later Wilfred Tagbo struck for the second time in as many games when he poked the ball home from a couple of yards following a corner.Jamie Doyle looked like he had put the home side in front just before the break when he volleyed past Ciaran Gallagher but he was adjudged to have been offside.Tagbo continued to test the UCD defence with a couple of decent efforts but it was UCD who took the lead for the second time in the 60th minute. Jamie Doyle caught the Harps defence cold after they only half-cleared an earlier effort to make it 2-1.But Ollie Horgan’s side stuck to their task.And just like last week’s game against Cobh Ramblers, veteran Kevin McHugh was to once again come off the bench to prove he knows exactly when their net is.The Killea man, with just minutes left on the clock, struck a sweet ball form all of 25 yards past UCD goalkeeper Niall Corbet to rescue a share of the spoils.UCD might have considered themselves a little unlucky not to have snatched all three points but it’s this battling spirit which will stand to Harps as the season wears on. HARPS COME FROM BEHIND TWICE TO SNATCH A DESERVED DRAW AGAINST UCD was last modified: April 4th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:donegalfinn harpsUCDlast_img read more

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Chalupsky wins record 12th Molokai title

first_img22 May 2012South Africa’s Oscar Chalupsky underlined his greatness in the Molokai World Championships surfski race in Hawaii on Sunday when he raced to his 12th victory in the event at the age of 49.Chalupsky had last won the race in 2005 and some had written him off, but he used the 53-kilometre race for motivation to get back into shape and boy did that work!In the early going, Chalupsky and fellow South African Matt Bouman followed the double paddled by Greg Barton and Zsolt Szadovski, but they had to let the pair go when the pace became too hard to maintain.Two hours from the finishTwo hours from the finish, nearing halfway in the race, Chalupsky, in fifth, hunted down Australia’s Martin Kenny and followed that up by reeling in and passing another Australian, Bruce Taylor.When the South African star saw nine-time champion Dean Gardiner ahead of him, he lifted his paddle tempo to take him past the Australian great.That left Chalupsky needing to pass defending champion Clint Robinson, 10 years his junior, and the winner of the K1 1 000 metres’ gold medal at the 1992 Barcelona Olympic Games.Good newsRobinson wasn’t in sight, but that was, in fact, good news for Chalupsky. The Aussie star was struggling with cramps, which had forced him to take a line further south where the conditions were less demanding and easier on his cramping body.With 20 minutes remaining to the finish, Chalupsky hit the front. As the finishing line neared, Robinson closed on the South African, but couldn’t make up the distance before the big man powered his way over the finish despite feeling, as he put it to Surfski.info: “stuffed”.The website also reported that Chalupsky’s brother, Herman, the 2004 winner of the Molokai World Championships, is facing a dilemma. It reported: “A few days back, in conversation with Joe Glickman, he declared: ‘If Oscar wins, I’ll eat my under-rods. But which ones to choose?”TimesBarton and Svadovski recorded the fastest overall time of 3:21:32, with Chalupsky the leading single in 3:24:07. Robinson finished 19 seconds behind the South African in 3:24:26, followed by the first local, Patrick Dolan, in 3:25:42.Matt Bouman had to settle for eighth place in a time of 3:29:04.Chalupsky first won the Molokai World Championships almost three decades ago in 1983! He went on to record seven victories in succession, up to 1989.In 1995, he teamed up with his brother Herman to take line honours. Eight years later, he again won the singles title. Herman captured victory the following year, in 2004, and Oscar followed that up with another win in 2005.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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South Africa’s tourism improves

first_imgWith September being National Tourism Month, we look at how South Africa fairs in the industry against other countries. Using the 2015 World Economic Forum (WEF) Travel and Tourism Competitiveness Report as a guideline, we track South Africa’s rise in the industry and what it is doing to attract the curious traveller.For more on travel and tourism, check out:Durban: A place to visitGlobal travellers rate South Africa tops in Condé Nast awardsWatch: Nelson Mandela Bay New Year timelapseWatch: A drone’s-eye view of Cape Town Click to view larger imagelast_img read more

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Green Technical Assistance Providers Wanted

first_imgEnterprise Green Communities is seeking qualified consultants to expand its Technical Assistance Providers Network in response to the growing demand for specialized technical assistance designing, developing, and operating green affordable housing developments. Enterprise has released its second national Request for Qualifications (RFQ) to identify the nation’s leading green professionals in the residential building sector. The objective of this RFQ is to expand the delivery of technical assistance to local affordable housing developers.The network of approved technical assistance providers will support project teams in one or more of the following categories:Integrated DesignDesign ReviewEnergy ServicesConstruction ReviewHVAC and Air Sealing/Insulation Walk-ThroughsHealthy Living EnvironmentPost-Construction Completion ReviewOperations and MaintenanceInterested parties are encouraged to submit a response to this RFQ that conveys organizational qualifications and project experience byJuly 19, 2010.To access the RFQ go to: http://www.greencommunitiesonline.org/tools/resources/technical_assistance.asplast_img read more

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How (Older) Homes Work

first_imgOpportunities for builders to obtain building science education may seem scant, but opportunities for people who own and operate buildings — particularly homeowners — are even rarer. About two years ago, this lack led to my developing a class for homeowners called “How (Older) Homes Work” (HOHW). My good friend and colleague, Steve Snider, really got got the ball rolling when he suggested that I come to his community (Newton, Massachusetts) to do this training as a two-evening seminar through a group called Historic Newton. The students were members of Historic Newton who owned and (frankly) needed help with their older homes. We intentionally set the two sessions a week apart, giving attendees a chance to digest the basics of building science and building performance, and to come back the next week with key questions and even their own projects for discussion.RELATED ARTICLESDo Homeowners Need to Understand Home Performance?Embarking on the Building Science Learning CurveGreen Building for BeginnersEnergy Upgrades for Beginners Building science basics for homeowners I have now done about a half dozen HOHWs in Vermont and Massachusetts. Most recently, the Western Massachusetts Green Consortium hosted HOHW at the World War II Club in Northampton, drawing over 60 people the first night with about 45 returning the following week. Here’s how the educational sessions were described in a Northampton HOHW press release: “Session 1, February 27, examines how heat and moisture interact in buildings, and looks at some building science ‘puzzles.’ As we make our homes more energy efficient, we shift the energy-moisture balance and potentially damage that building or compromise the health of occupants. Session 2, March 6, is an opportunity to bring your own building science puzzles and questions and will conclude with a survey of the tools and techniques used to diagnose building issues and energy efficiency.” The homeowner interest and demand for building performance knowledge is there. Here are some post-event survey comments from Northampton attendees: “Lots of good in-depth information.” “Very eye-opening; thank you!” “Could have used a third session!” “Excellent delivery of this information – so fundamental – so interesting!” “I understand some things that are going on in my home now.” Rules for this type of educational session Here is what I have learned from the How Older Homes Work events so far: We need to ensure that home inspectors, building performance auditors, and high-performance remodelers are all up-to-date on their building science knowledge so that homeowners can connect the results from the work of each. The internet is a double-edged sword for homeowners; they have access to a tidal wave of information about buildings, but the information generally overwhelms them rather than informing or guiding them. Scheduling a week between the two 2.5-hour sessions is really important. Everyone needs time to chew on so much new information. Start with simple, basic information, but don’t eliminate technical content; attendees will find their own level of understanding, which changes over time and with further study. Start with basic rules and then build to more complex examples. For example: Manage building performance in this order: water leaks, air leaks, drying, heat. Existing building performance is more complicated than new; with existing buildings, you need to assess and understand historical performance and current performance before you can improve building performance. There are three sources of moisture in buildings: the enclosure, the mechanical systems, and the occupants. They interact, so improving building performance almost always involves all three. Avoid building industry jargon and acronyms. (This is one I struggle with.) Homeowners only? Are “How (Older) Homes Work” events for building industry professionals as well as homeowners? I do encourage homeowners who are working with a builder or architect to bring the builder or architect with them. I also encourage building industry professionals to bring clients or prospective clients. But take care: this event is for homeowners, not the industry. On the second night of the Northampton HOHW, I let detailed technical questions from building professionals drive too much of the discussion and ran out of time for covering homeowner questions or an epic case study that one homeowner brought. Homeowners can use a questionnaire when interviewing designers or builders For the GBA community, one element introduced at the HOHW sessions is worth considering: a questionnaire for homeowners to use as they interview prospective building professionals for their project. Here is a link to the questionnaire. This is a draft document, and I am sure we can improve and sharpen this tool. I believe it is a tool for both homeowners and building professionals to use. For both, it is a way to distinguish high performance building in the marketplace. Author’s note: Many thanks to the Sustainable Energy Outreach Network and its staff (Guy Payne and Theresa Spear) for working with Building-Wright to make more of the HOHW events available to New England communities.   Peter Yost is GBA’s technical director. He is also the founder of a consulting company in Brattleboro, Vermont, called  Building-Wright. He routinely consults on the design and construction of both new homes and retrofit projects. He has been building, researching, teaching, writing, and consulting on high-performance homes for more than twenty years, and he’s been recognized as NAHB Educator of the Year. Do you have a building science puzzle? Contact Pete here.last_img read more

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Odisha House nod for Legislative Council

first_imgA resolution seeking creation of a Legislative Council in Odisha was passed in the State Assembly on Thursday.The resolution moved by State Parliamentary Affairs Minister Bikram Keshari Arukha was passed with as many as 104 of the total 147 legislators casting their votes in its favour. The ruling Biju Janata Dal has 117 members in the House.The legislators of opposition Congress and BJP staged a walkout before the resolution was put to vote. While Congress had opposed the idea of creation of the Council, the BJP had alleged that the government was moving ahead with the proposal to accommodate the sitting BJD legislators who will not be given tickets to contest the 2019 elections.The resolution will be sent to the Centre for approval of Parliament to facilitate creation of the Legislative Council.Wider consultationsAfter the passing of the resolution, Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik said the creation of the Council will be of great help as wider consultations are required to accelerate the growth momentum that the State has picked up.A proposal for creation of the Legislative Council in Odisha was passed by the State Cabinet on August 24.The proposed Council will have 49 members, which is one-third of the total members of the State Assembly.The Odisha government had set up a committee in 2015 to study the Legislative Councils in other States and recommend for establishment of one in the State.last_img read more

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The Final College Football Playoff Rankings Contradict History

The field for the inaugural College Football Playoff (CFP) was finally set Sunday, but — in true college football style — it wasn’t without controversy. The 12-person CFP selection committee chose Alabama, Oregon, Florida State and Ohio State, arguably snubbing Big 12 co-champions Baylor and (especially) TCU.The last four teams standing are exceptional. The Ducks, Crimson Tide and Buckeyes rank Nos. 1, 2 and 3, respectively, in ESPN’s Football Power Index (FPI). And although the Seminoles have been unconvincing throughout the season, it would have been difficult to justify leaving the undefeated, defending national champion out of the playoff — No. 10 FPI ranking be damned. So, the committee may well have made the best decision it could have, according to its mandate to select the nation’s four best teams.But by ranking TCU third (ahead of both Florida State and Ohio State) the week before the conference championships, the committee also set itself up to violate the precedent of how college football rankings have always worked. That’s why, even after previous No. 5 Ohio State rolled over No. 13 Wisconsin 59-0, the FiveThirtyEight College Football Playoff model — which is based on a historical analysis of Coaches Poll voters’ tendencies — saw little chance that TCU would drop from third place to fifth or lower in the committee’s final rankings.Using the traditional media polls as a guide, that was a reasonable assumption. Since the advent of the Bowl Coalition in 1992, only four times (in 214 opportunities) did the third-ranked team in the AP poll drop below fourth place the week after it won a game over an FBS opponent. All four of those teams (Florida State in Week 1 of the 2002 season, Ohio State in Week 3 of 2003, Tennessee in Week 1 of 2005 and Ohio State in Week 2 of 2008) posted victory margins that underwhelmed their pregame FPI expectations. By contrast, TCU beat its pregame expectations by 19 points in thrashing Iowa State. (And it bears repeating that none of those cases took place any later than the third week of a season, when you would expect voters to still be sorting out the order of teams.)And yet TCU did drop in the committee’s rankings — from third place to sixth, below Florida State, Ohio State and even Baylor (whom the committee had controversially slotted beneath TCU in every previous edition of its rankings, seemingly ignoring the Bears’ head-to-head victory over the Horned Frogs on Oct. 11). It was a stunning fall that, for better or worse, seemed to contradict the way college football teams traditionally move in the rankings.TCU’s exclusion also broke with tradition from another standpoint. Using poll data since 1992, I ran a logistic regression attempting to predict whether a team would finish the regular season in the AP’s top four based on various “résumé” statistics provided by ESPN’s Stats and Info Group. The factors that emerged as significant were a team’s winning percentage (modified slightly by Laplace’s Rule of Succession), its average points-per-game margin, its strength of schedule (according to the average FBS team’s expected winning percentage against its schedule using FPI), and whether it won its conference or not.This year, those criteria would have yielded the following probabilities of making the top four (assuming the committee would follow the pollsters’ traditional logic):(Note: Baylor and TCU were co-champions of the Big 12; for the purposes of the regression, they were each treated the same as a team that was sole champion of its conference.)It’s not outside the realm of plausibility that historical voters would exclude TCU and include Ohio State on the basis of their résumés alone (this method shows there was a 16 percent chance that would happen). In fact, the real AP poll dropped TCU from fourth to sixth, with two teams (Baylor and Ohio State) hurdling the Horned Frogs.It is, however, another way to underscore that the playoff committee may be rethinking the way college football teams have been ranked at the end of the season. As FiveThirtyEight’s editor in chief, Nate Silver, wrote in his final assessment of the committee’s selection, the sport’s old algorithm rarely entailed a top-to-bottom reassessment of the field this late in the year (voters usually just made slight adjustments to teams’ rankings after losses or big wins; otherwise the current rankings were basically enslaved to the previous rankings). The committee’s final rankings, on the other hand, suggest it sorted the teams from scratch after the conference championships, with no allegiance to its previous choices.That’s not necessarily a bad thing. But, like the existence of a playoff in the first place, it’s a new thing. read more

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Board of Trustees to discuss athletic compliance boosters

The Board of Trustees will meet today to discuss Ohio State’s Athletic Compliance Office.Though the board will delve into a number of different compliance concerns, an evaluation of OSU Boosters will lead the discussion.“Boosters and booster groups are consistently an area of primary concern amongst compliance officers across the country, and Ohio State shares these concerns,” according to a university report.The report cites both the size and abundance of booster groups as reasons for potential risk.Because these groups operate on their own and use only their own resources, policing them can be difficult, according to the university.The compliance department, which concerns itself with the enforcement, monitoring, procedures and education of NCAA and Big Ten rules, listed several consequences that would stem from potential noncompliance. Not the least of which was the possibility of a diminished university reputation that the board said would affect “all aspects of campus life” and “would significantly affect philanthropic giving.”To combat the difficulty of enforcing rules among the widespread booster groups and to avoid potential sanctions, the compliance office is considering models used by other universities with similar concerns.These schools, according to the report, “elected to consolidate their booster groups within the athletic department” to increase the ease of communication between the university and its boosters.The report made mention of two Big Ten institutions, Indiana University and the University of Michigan, which have recently been under NCAA scrutiny for major compliance infractions. Following the infractions “at both institutions, significant financial resources were spent as defended their name and reputation,” according to the report.Following today’s discussions, the compliance office will offer its suggestions to the director of athletics as it deems appropriate. read more

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Baseball Ohio State begins ninegame homestand against Northern Kentucky

Scouting Northern KentuckyThe Norse have had a rough time getting things going this season, compiling a 12-22 record that includes an abysmal 6-19 road record. The one thing that has gone well for the Norse this year has been their ability to produce at the plate. As a team, they are batting .275 with 36 home runs so far this season, including a pair of hitters with eight home runs and four regulars batting above .300. The team has scored a total of 211 runs, averaging 6.21 runs per game. Its star bat this season has been junior first baseman and pitcher Trey Ganns. Ganns has eight home runs, while his .310 batting average is sitting as the team’s second-highest among starters. Ganns, the team’s cleanup hitter, has demonstrated an acute ability to clean up the bases, leading the Norse with 32 RBIs this season.Scoring runs has not been an issue for the team. Rather, the issue has been keeping the opponents from scoring runs of their own. Across 287.2 innings the season, the Norse have posted a team ERA of 6.41, which ranks 260th out of 295 Division I programs. Pitchers have struggled to limit contact, having surrendered 364 hits this season (.370 opponents’ average). Finding More Consistency in the OffenseThe Buckeyes’ inability to keep the bats going for extended periods of time has been cited by coach Greg Beals as the chief issue for the team.After the team took two of three against Penn State with a combined 16 runs over the final two games of that series, the OSU offense mustered just two combined runs against a pair of midweek opponents in Cincinnati and Eastern Michigan, and was shut out by Michigan State in its first of the three games in the past weekend’s series. “We’ve been working really hard just with our offensive approach,” Beals said in a press conference last Thursday. “The two midweek games, we didn’t score enough runs to win the game, especially Wednesday night’s game, we pitched the ball really, really well.”Though his team has shown a lot of signs of struggle, Beals said he believes the talent is there for his team to start putting it all together, and he hopes his bats can click in opportune moments.“Each of the guys in our offensive lineup have shown signs of greatness, and we’ve got to find a way to get that out more consistently, and it’s an approach thing that we’ve got to do,” Beals said. “We’ve got to make sure that we are locked in on the pitches we are going to get and be consistent in that approach throughout an at-bat and be able to string some quality at bats together to produce some runs.”The Buckeyes hope to get that offense going again when they take on Northern Kentucky on Wednesday with first pitch scheduled for 6:35 p.m. Then-junior outfielder Tre’ Gantt is greeted by teammates outside the dugout after scoring a run over the weekend in the Big Ten/Pac-12 Challenge in Surprise, Arizona. Credit: Courtesy of Press Pros MagazineOhio State (15-21, 4-8) has been on the road for a while.It’s had some midweek home games mixed in there, but the past two weekend series have been on the road for the Buckeyes.Now OSU is getting a chance to enjoy some home cooking with its second nine-game homestand of the season, which will kick off on Wednesday with a matchup against the Northern Kentucky Norse (12-22, 6-6 Horizon League).The Buckeyes found little success the last time they played nine consecutive home games, amassing a 4-5 record and a 1-4 record in conference games. read more

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Man Utd attempting to sign Alderweireld

first_imgManchester United are reportedly attempting to complete a £55m deal for Toby Alderweireld from Tottenham, claims Manchester Evening NewsThe defender is widely expected to leave Spurs in the summer after falling out of favour with head coach Mauricio Pochettino over the course of this season.While the Argentine remains keen to tie down Alderweireld to a new long-term contract, Spurs are reluctant to match the Belgian’s wage demands.The Norton London side are currently not in a position to be forced into anything with Alderweireld as they have the option to renew his current deal by another year, meaning that the 29-year-old will have to wait until 2020 to leave the club as a free agent.harry maguire, manchester UnitedMaguire says United need to build on today’s win George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Harry Maguire wants his United teammates to build on the victory over Leicester City.During the summer, Harry Maguire was referred to as the ultimate…However, Alderweireld will have the option himself to activate a £25m release clause for the remaining two weeks of the 2019 summer transfer window.In light of this, it seems almost certain that Pochettino will sell the defender with Davinson Sanchez having performed well in the heart of the Spurs defence in Alderweireld’s place.Jose Mourinho has been alerted to this latest development and has identified Alderweireld as someone that will fit in well with his system at United.The Portuguese coach has grown tired of Phil Jones and Victor Lindelof’s struggles and will be in the market for a new centre-back this summer.last_img read more

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