Tag: 唔准唔开心

The Africa you never see

first_img23 October 2006In the waiting area of a large office complex in Accra, Ghana, it’s standing room only as citizens with bundles of cash line up to buy shares of a mutual fund that has yielded an average 60% annually for the past seven years.Africa: Open for BusinessCarol Pineau, a journalist with more than 10 years’ experience reporting on Africa, is the producer and director of the film Africa: Open for Business, which aired worldwide on the BBC in May 2006 and has been released for purchase on DVD at Africa: Open for Business.They’re entrusting their hard-earned cash to a local company called Databank, which invests in stock markets in Ghana, Nigeria, Botswana and Kenya that consistently rank among the world’s top growth markets.Chances are you haven’t read or heard anything about Databank in your daily newspaper or on the evening news, where the little coverage of Africa that’s offered focuses almost exclusively on the negative – the virulent spread of HIV/Aids, genocide in Darfur, the chaos of Zimbabwe.Yes, Africa is a land of wars, poverty and corruption. The situation in places like Darfur, Sudan desperately cries out for more media attention and international action.But Africa is also a land of stock markets, high rises, Internet cafes and a growing middle class. This is the part of Africa that functions. And this Africa also needs media attention, if it’s to have any chance of fully joining the global economy.Africa’s media image comes at a high cost – even, at the extreme, the cost of lives. Stories about hardship and tragedy aim to tug at our heartstrings, getting us to dig into our pockets or urge Congress to send more aid.But no country or region ever developed thanks to aid alone. Investment, and the job and wealth creation it generates, is the only road to lasting development. That’s how China, India and the Asian Tigers did it.Highest return on FDI in the worldYet while Africa, according to the US government’s Overseas Private Investment Corporation, offers the highest return in the world on foreign direct investment, it attracts the least.Unless investors see the Africa that’s worthy of investment, they won’t put their money into it. And that lack of investment translates into job stagnation, continued poverty and limited access to education and health care.Consider a few facts. The Ghana Stock Exchange regularly tops the list of the world’s highest-performing stock markets. Botswana, with its A+ credit rating, boasts one of the highest per capita government savings rates in the world, topped only by Singapore and a handful of other fiscally prudent nations.Cellphones are making phenomenal profits on the continent. Brand-name companies like Coca-Cola, GM, Caterpillar and Citibank have invested in Africa for years and are quite bullish on the future.Caricaturing a continentThe failure to show this side of Africa creates a one-dimensional caricature of a complex continent. Imagine if 9/11, the Oklahoma City bombing and school shootings were all that the rest of the world knew about America.I recently produced a documentary on entrepreneurship and private enterprise in Africa. Throughout the year-long process, I came to realise how all of us in the media – even those with a true love of the continent – portray it in a way that’s truly to its detriment.The first cameraman I called to film the documentary laughed and said, “Business and Africa, aren’t those contradictory terms?” The second got excited imagining heart-warming images of women’s co-ops and market stalls brimming with rustic crafts. Several friends simply assumed I was doing a documentary on Aids. After all, what else does one film in Africa?The little-known fact is that businesses are thriving throughout Africa. With good governance and sound fiscal policies, countries like Botswana, Ghana, Uganda, Senegal and many more are bustling, their economies growing at surprisingly robust rates.Somalia: surprise, surprisePrivate enterprise is not just limited to the well-behaved nations. You can’t find a more war-ravaged land than Somalia, which has been without a central government for more than a decade.The big surprise? Private enterprise is flourishing. Mogadishu has the cheapest cellphone rates on the continent, mostly due to no government intervention. In the northern city of Hargeysa, the markets sell the latest satellite phone technology. The electricity works.When the state collapsed in 1991, the national airline went out of business. Today, there are five private carriers and price wars keep the cost of tickets down. This is not the Somalia you see in the media.Obviously life there would be dramatically improved by good governance – or even just some governance – but it’s also true that, through resilience and resourcefulness, Somalis have been able to create a functioning society.African solutionsMost African businesses suffer from an extreme lack of infrastructure, but the people I met were too determined to let this stop them. It just costs them more. Without reliable electricity, most businesses have to use generators. They have to dig bore-holes for a dependable water source. Telephone lines are notoriously out of service, but cellphones are filling the gap.Throughout Africa, what I found was a private sector working hard to find African solutions to African problems.One example that will always stick in my mind is the CEO of Vodacom Congo, the largest cellphone company in that country. Alieu Conteh started his business while the civil war was still raging. With rebel troops closing in on the airport in Kinshasa, no foreign manufacturer would send in a cell phone tower, so Conteh got locals to collect scrap metal, which they welded together to build one. That tower still stands today.As I interviewed successful entrepreneurs, I was continually astounded by their ingenuity, creativity and steadfastness. These people are the future of the continent. They are the ones we should be talking to about how to move Africa forward.Obsession with victims, savioursInstead, the media concentrates on victims or government officials, and as anyone who has worked in Africa knows, government is more often a part of the problem than of the solution.When the foreign media descend on the latest crisis, the person they look to interview is invariably the foreign saviour, an aid worker from the United States or Europe. African saviours are everywhere, delivering aid on the ground. But they don’t seem to be in our cultural belief system.It’s not just the media, either. Look at the literature put out by almost any non-governmental organisation. The better ones show images of smiling African children – smiling because they have been helped by the NGO. The worst promote the extended-belly, flies-on-the-face cliche of Africa, hoping that the pain of seeing those images will fill their coffers. “We hawk poverty”, one NGO worker admitted to me.Last November, ABC’s “Primetime Live” aired a special on Britain’s Prince Harry and his work with Aids children in Lesotho. The segment, titled “The Forgotten Kingdom: Prince Harry in Lesotho”, painted the tiny nation as a desperate, desolate place. The programme’s message was clear: This helpless nation at last had a knight – or prince – in shining armour.By the time the charity addresses came up at the end, you were ready to give, and that’s good. Lesotho needs help with its Aids problem. But would it really have hurt the story to add that this land-locked nation with few natural resources has jump-started its economy by aggressively courting foreign investment?The reality is that it’s anything but a “forgotten kingdom”, as a dramatic increase in exports has made it the top beneficiary of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA), a duty-free, quota-free US-Africa trade agreement. More than 50 000 people have gotten jobs through the country’s initiatives.Couldn’t the programme have portrayed an African country that was in need of assistance, but was neither helpless nor a victim?Whose portrait of Africa?
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The Keiskamma Tapestry

first_imgIn the entrance to the South African Parliament a remarkable piece of artwork winds its way along the wall, its 120-metre length reaching through the lobby to wrap around the exterior of the chamber.This is the Keiskamma Tapestry, an exquisite embroidery in the tradition of the famous Bayeux Tapestry and the work of over 100 previously unemployed women from the Eastern Cape.Along its length, the tapestry tells the turbulent history of the Cape frontier region, from the Stone Age San through the wars and tragedies of the Xhosa people to the peaceful resolution of the 1994 elections.The embroidery depicting the San Bushmen, the earliest inhabitants of the Eastern Cape, mimics the rock art the hunter-gatherers left behind (Image: Keiskamma Trust)The artwork’s presence in Parliament reflects the kinder, more vibrant and open nature of post-apartheid South Africa. Under the old regime, forbidding portraits of the 1961 Cabinet stared down from the walls of the austere lobby – including one of HF Verwoerd, the architect of grand apartheid.Interestingly, Verwoerd features on the tapestry, at the Rand Show in 1961 – the site of the first assassination attempt against him – and right next to an image of Nelson Mandela burning his pass book during the ANC’s 1959 defiance campaign.Nelson Mandela burning his pass book during the 1959 Defiance Campaign, and HF Verwoerd, the architect of apartheid, in 1961 (Image: Keiskamma Trust)From craft to artThe tapestry is a product of the Keiskamma Trust, set up in 2000 as a skills development project in the impoverished Hamburg region of the Eastern Cape. The trust helps women of the region develop their traditional embroidery skills to produce craftwork of a scale and skill that approaches art – which has a higher premium.Inspired by the Bayeux Tapestry, created by Saxon women in 1067 to tell the story of the Norman invasion of England, the Keiskamma Tapestry follows the same form as that artwork, with a similar narrative structure.The first panel of the Bayeux Tapestry, created in 1067 (Image: Museum of Reading)It begins with the San Bushmen, the earliest inhabitants of the Eastern Cape, with embroidered replicas of the rock art images of animals and human forms the hunter gatherers left behind.It then follows the history of the Xhosa people in the region, to the arrival of the white colonial settlers, the frontier wars and the great cattle killing of 1856.In that tragic event Nongqawuse, a 15-year-old girl prophet, instructed the people to kill 400 000 of their cattle, leading to mass starvation and the end of effective Xhosa resistance to white encroachment.The great Xhosa cattle killing of 1856 (Image: Keiskamma Trust)Cattle are a dominant motif throughout the tapestry, reflecting their importance in the history and economy of the Xhosa people.The tapestry continues through the history of the Eastern Cape and South Africa as a whole, ending with the country’s first democratic elections in 1994. In creating the epic embroidery, the trust says, the women involved came to learn about their own history, which they can then disseminate throughout their community.The people of the Eastern Cape queuing to vote in the 1994 elections (Image: Keiskamma Trust)The Keiskamma Tapestry was created with funding from the Department of Arts and Culture and over 100 private donations. The Standard Bank bought the work for R500 000, and loaned it for a long-term exhibit in Parliament.It was unveiled by Parliamentary Speaker Baleka Mbete on International Women’s Day, 8 March 2006, at a ceremony attended, among others, by all of the Eastern Cape women who laboured to create it.View the full Keiskamma Tapestry on the Keiskamma Trust website.SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Mandela: a remarkable 92 years

first_imgNelson Mandela with Siphiwe Tshabalala, the South African football star who scored the very first goal of the 2010 Fifa World Cup. (Image: Nelson Mandela Foundation)President, Nobel Peace Prize laureate and statesman, Nelson Mandela, the world’s icon of reconciliation, compassion and goodwill, turns 92 on Sunday 18 July 2010.The day will be the first international Nelson Mandela Day, as declared by the United Nations in 2009. On the day, people around the world are urged to spend 67 minutes helping others, to celebrate the 67 years Mandela spent fighting apartheid.Today, US secretary of state Hillary Rodham Clinton issued a statement wishing Mandela happy birthday.“I am honoured and humbled to call President Mandela my friend,” she said. “Like millions of his admirers around the world, I am deeply moved by his generosity of spirit and unfailing courage in the face of overwhelming obstacles.“Nelson Mandela is a hero to people of all backgrounds and experience who strive for freedom and progress. His story is filled with an amazing strength and integrity of spirit. There is no one more deserving of this unprecedented international recognition, and I am delighted to offer him my warmest wishes on this special day.”Already, birthday presents are piling up at the Nelson Mandela Foundation’s gift office – many of them vuvuzela trumpets. Times Live reports that many of the presents began to arrive after the end of the 2010 Fifa World Cup, and they include a basket of books from Peru’s ambassador, a woollen hat from NGO Gogo Magic and a wooden boat from the Cameroonian soccer team.On Saturday Mandela will celebrate his birthday with South African President Jacob Zuma and other African National Congress dignitaries, and spend Sunday, his birthday, with his family, including his wife Graca Machel.An enormous legacyNelson Mandela’s 92 years have been remarkable.After spending 27 years in apartheid’s prisons, Mandela became South Africa’s first democratically elected president in 1994. He united a fraught and fearful country, bringing together blacks and whites when South Africa was living through violent and troubled times.His legacy is enormous, and most tangible in the Nelson Mandela Foundation and the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund. The former embodies the spirit of reconciliation, ubuntu and social justice, working through strategic networks and partnerships to capture the vision and values of Mandela’s life; the latter with developing programmes and partnerships to protect and improve the lives of children and youth.Out of the children’s fund grew the 46664 initiative, a worldwide concert fundraising programme to help victims and orphans of Aids.This year, his birthday was commemorated as Mandela Day, celebrated worldwide. It is hoped that the day will become a global fixture, to always remember the sacrifices Mandela made for peace and reconciliation in South Africa.Part of Mandela Day was a campaign to encourage everyone across the world to take 67 minutes in the day to do something for the good of humanity and the planet.“Mr Mandela has spent 67 years making the world a better place. We’re asking you for 67 minutes,” says the Mandela Day website.Troublemaker from the Eastern CapeNelson Rolihlahla Mandela was born on 18 July 1918 in Mvezo in the Eastern Cape province, the son of a chief of the Tembu clan of the Xhosa nation. At the age of seven he was enrolled in the local missionary school, where he was given the name “Nelson”, after the Admiral Horatio Nelson of the Royal Navy, by a Methodist teacher who found his African name difficult to pronounce. That name, Rohlihlahla, means “troublemaker”.After his father was stripped of his chieftainship following a dispute with a local magistrate, Mandela and his mother moved to the small village of Qunu. In 1927, when Mandela was nine, his father died, and the boy became the ward of the Tembu regent, Jongintaba Dalindyebo. He was to be groomed to assume high office but, influenced by the cases that came before the chief’s court, decided to become a lawyer.In 1939, after he had matriculated from school, Mandela enrolled at the University College of Fort Hare for a bachelor of arts degree. But the following year, after being suspended from college for joining in a protest boycott and fleeing an arranged marriage, he moved to South Africa’s principal city, Johannesburg.Arriving in Alexandra township in the north of the city, he found work as a guard at one of Johannesburg’s many gold mines, and later as an articled clerk at a law firm. He completed his degree by correspondence at the University of South Africa, and began to study law at the University of the Witwatersrand.In 1942 Mandela entered politics by joining the African National Congress (ANC), South Africa’s major liberation movement and today the country’s ruling party. It was during this time that he and a small group of mainly young members of the ANC embarked on a mission to transform the party into a mass movement.In 1944 he, Anton Lembede and Mandela’s lifelong friends and comrades Oliver Tambo and Walter Sisulu founded the ANC Youth League (ANCYL). That year he also married his first wife, Evelyn Mase. In 1947 he was elected president of the ANCYL.The year 1948 was a dark one in South Africa, with the election of the racist National Party, voted into government by a white electorate on the platform of apartheid. In response, in 1949, the ANC adopted its Programme of Action, inspired by the Youth League, which advocated the weapons of boycott, strike, civil disobedience and non-cooperation with authority. The programme aimed at the attainment of full citizenship and direct parliamentary representation for all South Africans. In policy documents co-written by Mandela, the ANCYL paid special attention to the redistribution of the land, trade union rights, free and compulsory education for all children, and mass education for adults.During the Campaign for Defiance of Unjust Laws in 1952, Mandela was elected the ANC’s national volunteer-in-chief and travelled the country organising resistance to discriminatory laws. He was charged and brought to trial for his role in the campaign and given a suspended prison sentence.Mandela and Tambo attorneysIn recognition of his contribution to the defiance campaign, Mandela was elected president of both the Youth League and the Transvaal region of the ANC at the end of 1952. He subsequently became the deputy president of the ANC.Soon after the defiance campaign, Mandela passed his attorney’s admission examination and was admitted to the profession. In 1952 he and Oliver Tambo opened a law firm in downtown Johannesburg.Tambo, the chairperson of the ANC at the time of his death in April 1993, wrote of their practice: “To reach our desks each morning Nelson and I ran the gauntlet of patient queues of people overflowing from the chairs in the waiting room into the corridors … Our buff office files carried thousands of these stories and if, when we started our law partnership, we had not been rebels against apartheid, our experiences in our offices would have remedied the deficiency. We had risen to professional status in our community, but every case in court, every visit to the prisons to interview clients, reminded us of the humiliation and suffering burning into our people.”The 1950s turned out to be a time of strife and tribulation for Mandela – he was banned, arrested and imprisoned. His personal life was also in some turmoil, with him divorcing Evelyn to marry Winnie Madikizela. He was also one of the accused in the historic Treason Trial that ended in 1961, with the state dropping all charges.The Black PimpernelIn 1960 police opened fire on a group of protesters in the township of Sharpeville, killing 69 people. The reaction was immediate, with demonstrations, protest marches, strikes and riots across South Africa. On March 30 1960, the government declared a state of emergency, detaining more than 18 000 people, and banning the ANC and other liberation movements.With the banning, the ANC leadership went underground and Mandela was forced to live away from his family. He was a master of disguise and managed to evade the police, a feat which earned him the nickname in the media as the Black Pimpernel.The banning also forced the ANC to move from nonviolent to violent means of opposing apartheid. Umkhonto we Sizwe, the movement’s armed wing, was formed in 1961, with Mandela as commander-in-chief. After travelling abroad for several months, he was arrested in 1962 on his return to South Africa for unlawfully exiting the country and for incitement to strike. Convicted, he was sentenced to five years on Robben Island, the notorious political prison off the coast near Cape Town.While serving this sentence, he was charged with sabotage in the infamous Rivonia Trial. In 1964 Mandela was sentenced to life imprisonment.Eighteen of Mandela’s 27 years in jail were spent on Robben island, where he carried out hard labour in a lime quarry. As a D-group prisoner, the lowest classification, he was allowed only one visitor and one letter every six months. While in prison Mandela studied by correspondence with the University of London, earning a Bachelor of Laws degree. In 1984 he was transferred to Pollsmoor Prison in Cape Town, and in December of that year he was moved to Victor Verster Prison near Paarl in the Western Cape.President of South AfricaOver the years, South Africa slowly descended into near-chaos, with almost constant unrest inside the country, armed insurgency from without, and steadily increasing international pressure from the international community to end apartheid. On 2 February 1990 the country’s National Party president, FW de Klerk, made a remarkable announcement: a negotiated settlement would end apartheid, all liberation movements would be unbanned, and all political prisoners released – including Nelson Mandela.Nine days later Mandela walked out of Victor Verster prison, his wife Winnie on his arm and his fist raised in the liberation movement salute.In 1991, at the first national conference of the ANC held inside South Africa after its decades-long banning, Mandela was elected president of the party. His long-time friend, Tambo, became national chairperson. In 1993 he and FW de Klerk were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for their different roles in the peaceful end of apartheid.In 1994, after South Africa’s first democratic elections, Mandela became president of the Republic of South Africa. That year he published his autobiography, Long Walk to Freedom, which he started writing in prison.After serving a five-year term as president of the country, Mandela ceded the ANC presidency to Thabo Mbeki. He retired from public life in June 1999, though not from the public eye. He built himself a home in his birthplace in Qunu, which he visits as often as he can.FriendshipsKnown affectionately by his clan name of Madiba, Mandela has friends across the world – Bill Clinton, Bono of U2, Naomi Campbell. His friendships go back in some cases 60 years, as with Walter Sisulu, Oliver Tambo and Ahmed Kathrada.In his autobiography Memoirs, Kathrada recounts that he and Mandela affectionately called one another madala, isiZulu for old man.“Charming and charismatic, he has both a magnetic personality and a commanding presence,” writes Kathrada. “An uncommon amalgam of peasant and aristocrat, he is a living paradox: a democrat par excellence, with just a touch of the autocrat; at once proud but simple; soft yet tenacious; obstinate and flexible; vain one moment and humble the next; infinitely tolerant but also impatient.”Kathrada and Mandela spent 18 years together on Robben Island and a further seven in Pollsmoor Prison, along with Sisulu.“For all the public exposure and media attention Madiba remains an enigma to all but his most intimate circle,” concludes Kathrada.He recounts an incident with a terminally ill girl, Michelle Britz, that is typical of Mandela. She wanted to meet Madiba, and when she met Kathrada on Robben Island, he got to know of her wish. Kathrada passed on her wish to the then president, who sprang into action immediately.“The president of South Africa, a universally respected statesman with one of the busiest schedules on earth, flew to the Mpumalanga town of Secunda by helicopter, bearing gifts for a sick child.“The emotional meeting between Madiba and Michelle was shown on national television, and as she clasped her little arms around his neck and kissed him, the eyes of millions must have filled with tears, just as mine did.”In his honourNelson Mandela has the freedom of 45 cities around the world, and honorary citizenship of 11 cities.In Johannesburg, Madiba’s image is cast in a 6m high bronze statue and stands preserved in his famous jive in Nelson Mandela Square.Speaking at the statue’s unveiling in April 2004, Ndileka Mandela, Madiba’s eldest granddaughter, said: “This is a very happy statue. The dancing stance pays tribute to the spirit of joy and celebration inherent in the people of South Africa.”The countless tributes to him around the world are without precedent. He has 23 schools, universities and institutions named after him; 25 halls, buildings, monuments and housing developments; 13 stadiums, squares, plazas, parks and gardens; 91 streets, roads, boulevards and parks; 32 bursaries and scholarships, foundations and lectures. Thirteen statues, sculptures and artworks carry his name.Madiba had collected dozens of accolades from around the world: 18 sports-related honours and awards, and 115 other awards.He has a range of strange items named after him: a landfill site, a spider, a seaslug, a protea, a tea, an orchid, a rescue dog, and a racehorse.Marriage, children and old ageMandela and Winnie divorced in 1996. In 1998 he married Graca Machel, widow of Samora Machel, the president of Mozambique until his death in 1986.The 18th of July 2010 will not only be Mandela’s 92nd birthday; it is also the 12th anniversary of his marriage to Machel. In a 2008 interview with Mike Hanna on the Al Jazeera television network, she describes how lonely Mandela was when she first met him.“After 27 years in jail, what he most longed for was not the glory of political life, but to have a family life,” she said. “It was a meeting of minds and a meeting of hearts.” Although she hadn’t wanted another marriage after Samora Machel’s death, she decided that her gift to Mandela on his 80th birthday would be to marry him.“Madiba has allowed me to continue to be myself. He has always respected my space. We have a deep sense of sharing, but at the same time we respect each other’s identities.“For a man of his age, a man who has gone through those kinds of experiences, he could have become extremely possessive. He’s not. Maybe that’s what love really means. We have found a balanced and respectful way of relating.”Today Mandela and Machel spend most of their time at their home in the upmarket suburb of Houghton, in Johannesburg. His greatest pleasure of his old age, he says, is watching the sun set, with the music of Handel or Tchaikovsky playing in the background.A short distance from the tranquil surrounds of Houghton, his famous words from the Rivonia Trial echo on the walls of the Drill Hall in central Johannesburg:“I have fought against white domination, and I have fought against black domination. I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. It is an ideal for which I hope to live and to achieve. But if it needs be, it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die.”last_img read more

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More awards for SA film

first_img Festival director J’aimee Skippon-Volk described the film as “exceptional” and as having “a lot of heart”. Thomas Gumede, who plays the role of New Year in the movie, accepted the awards via video link. “It is such an honour to be part of a project that comes from such a small town like Lamontville to be shown among an international audience.” Otelo Burning was in development for seven years and came out of an extensive workshop process held with a group of children in the township. “It’s not just a story that someone sat in a room and made up. It’s a Lamontville story, told by the people of Lamontville,” Blecher said. It was taken to the No Borders IFP (Independent Filmmaker Project) in New York City in 2009 and was selected for the IFP Independent Film Narratice Labs in 2011; it was funded by South African investors through the Department of Trade and Industry’s film incentive rebate. The film gained international recognition and a slew of awards following its release in 2012. These include official selection at London’s BFI Film Festival, France’s Lille Film Festival, India’s Chennai Film Festival and the Seattle Film Festival, as well as a nomination for the Golden Needle Award at the Seattle Film Festival. It won best cinematography and best child actor at the 2012 Africa Movie Academy Awards in Lagos and best film at the Cape Wine Lands Festival. Blecher was also awarded the IFP Adrienne Shelly Director’s Grant in New York. More recent awards also included best lighting designer, make-up artist and best movie at the 2013 Africa Magic Viewer’s Choice Awards, also hosted over the weekend. SAinfo reporter 14 March 2013 South African film Otelo Burning added to a long list of accolades over the weekend, picking up a hat-trick of awards at Australia’s Byron Bay International Film Festival – the first film ever to claim the honour. The film is about a group of youngsters from the Lamontville township in KwaZulu-Natal who discover a love of surfing. It was shot in Durban, is in Zulu with English subtitles and stars Jafta Mamabolo, Thomas Gumede and Tshepang Mohlomi. It is set in 1989 in the midst brewing conflict between two political groups in Lamontville, according to the filmmakers. Surfing allows the characters Otelo Buthelezi, his younger brother Ntwe and friend New Year an escape from the violence of where they live. What follows is a story of human foibles at an explosive time in South Africa’s history. “Set against the backdrop of Nelson Mandela’s release from prison, it looks at the enormous potential for change at the time of apartheid’s downfall – all seen through the eyes of a child,” said director Sarah Blecher. Its clean sweep at the Byron Bay Festival was an important international win for the film. It won the Owners Club at Linnaeus Best Film Award, the Byron Bay Coffee Company Best Dramatic Feature Award and the Tavarus Best Surf Film Award.last_img read more

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Report Finds Performance of Web Apps Throttled on iOS Devices

first_imgaudrey watters Apple iOS devices run Web applications two-and-a-half times more slowly when they’re launched from the home screen than when they’re run from within the mobile Safari browser. According to numerous tests by the technology blog The Register, when Web apps are saved to the home screen and launched this way, they aren’t able to take advantage of Safari’s recently updated Nitro JavaScript engine nor do they get to utilize some Web caching systems.The poor performance of these Web apps could simply be a bug introduced in the most recent iOS. Or it could be an intentional move by Apple to make it more difficult for those who’d like to bypass its App Store and offer Web rather than native apps. Eyebrows are raised here, no doubt, as The Register’s discovery comes on the heels of Apple’s announcement that it will require all in-app purchases to run through its new subscription plan. That gives Apple a 30% cut, something that many developers have balked at.One way to avoid the new in-app purchase rules – and to avoid paying Apple its 30% share of app sales as well – is to build your app as a Web app. While this means the app isn’t available via iTunes, Apple does allow users to add any Web page to their home screen. This creates a little icon on the iPhone that makes it appear as though it’s just another app. However, if these apps aren’t fully functional, or aren’t as functional as native apps, it may be a disincentive for developers and for users to go that route.The issue has been brought to light on developer forums, Hacker News, and Stack Overflow, and The Register reports that Apple is aware of the problem. It has offered no official comment, however, and no indication if this will be rectified.If Apple is intentionally throttling the performance of Web apps, it does call into question the company’s support for HTML5 and Web standards. CEO Steve Jobs asserted that support in a statement last year. Justifying Apple’s lack of Flash, Jobs wrote that, “Apple has adopted HTML5, CSS and JavaScript – all open standards. Apple’s mobile devices all ship with high performance, low power implementations of these open standards.”Making “open” Web apps perform more poorly certainly challenges the company’s stance on these standards. Related Posts Tags:#Apple#NYT#web Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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4 Best Project Management Apps for the iPad

first_imgIf you’re a users of the open source Gantt Project, or just need a simple Gantt chart app for the iPad, Project Planner HD is worth a look. It can import and export Gannt Project files, export PDFs, and manage tasks and multiple projects.Projector Related Posts Projector is a popular and slick looking project management app for both OSX and iOS. Macintosh users starting fresh might want to give it a try.SG Project Trackerbot is an iOS client for the popular Pivotal Tracker agile project management SaaS. Trackerbot is a project of Vulpine Labs and is not related to Pivotal Labs, the makers of Pivotal Tracker.Trackerbot lets uses create, edit, reject, delete and comment on Pivotal Tracker stories. Attachments are supported. Vulpine Labs claims the app will support large projects.Which Is the Best? Tags:#enterprise#mobile 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now IT + Project Management: A Love Affair SG Project 2 and SG Project Pro are some of the most fully featured project management apps available for the iPad. SG Project can import and export Microsoft Project files.Trackerbot Project management seems like an obvious use case for iPads, so we were surprised to see a relatively small number of professional project management applications. But we found a few. For this article we decided to focus only on native iPad applications – we’ll look at tablet-optimized Web apps another time.Which of these is your favorite? Are there any you think we should have included?Project Planner HD Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Thanks to the readers who suggested iPad project management apps via Twitter! klint finley Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of…last_img read more

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Sex crime unit investigating allegations against Hedleys Jacob Hoggard police

first_imgTORONTO – Jacob Hoggard, the frontman for the embattled Canadian rock band Hedley, is being investigated by the Toronto police sex crime unit as allegations continue to plague the singer.Police spokeswoman Katrina Arrogante said Friday she could not provide specifics of the allegations, but said no charges have been laid.In a statement last month, Hoggard and the Vancouver-based band said Hedley will be taking an “indefinite hiatus” after the end of their Canada-wide tour March 23.The two-time Juno winners and former MuchMusic darlings have been under fire since sexual misconduct allegations began surfacing online last month, suggesting inappropriate encounters with young fans.Hoggard also faced allegations including groping and making inappropriate sexual remarks to a Calgary radio host seven years ago.A 24-year-old Ottawa fan of the band alleged to the CBC in February that she was sexually assaulted by Hoggard after chatting with him on the dating app Tinder and agreeing to meet him at a hotel in Toronto.Hoggard’s lawyer Brian Shiller said in a statement at the time that Hoggard and the woman had “made a mutual plan to get together to have sex and they did just that.”Shiller was not immediately available for comment on the Toronto police investigation.In his own statement last month, Hoggard said he has never engaged in non-consensual sexual behaviour, but acknowledged he “behaved in a way that objectified women” and was “reckless and dismissive of their feelings.”“I understand the significant harm that is caused not only to the women I interacted with, but to all women who are degraded by this type of behaviour,” Hoggard said. “I have been careless and indifferent and I have no excuse. For this I am truly sorry.”The CBC published another report Friday of a Toronto woman who alleges Hoggard tried to force her to do things without her consent during a sexual encounter in 2016.The musician denied the allegations last week after the broadcaster informed him that another woman had come forward.“I did not engage in any sexual activity without her consent,” he said on Twitter. “The allegation is startling and categorically untrue. It is not within my capacity as a person to force anyone beyond their boundaries.”In the fallout since allegation first surfaced, the group has been dropped by its management team, blacklisted by scores of radio stations and abandoned by musicians booked as tour openers.Hedley also withdrew itself from consideration for the Juno Awards and backed out of performing on the telecast.last_img read more

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