Tag: 南京桑拿论坛

SUNS SEND WARNING TO NTL OPPOSITION

first_imgIn an ominous sign for rival NTL teams, the Southern NSW Suns Mens and Womens team took centre stage at the Yass Touch Knockout, winning both the Mens and Womens A Grade divisions last weekend.The Suns Mens Open side defeated the Dusty Camels from Sydney’s Western Suburbs 11-10 in the final.Led by quality players including Matt Curran, Joel Willoughby, Brad Holden and Andrew Baggio, the Suns held off strong opposition to take the title.Young guns Jaden Kelly, Scott Naughton and Christian Lotter all debuted for the Suns at Open level, impressing coach Ian Stanley.For the Dusty Camels experienced Australian representative Tony Eltakchi, along with Nathan Jones and Daniel Rushworth, challenged the Suns into the dying seconds, thrilling the crowd.The Suns Womens Open team, coached by Tracey Bills, defeated the Subs from Castle Hill 10-7 in their final. Stacey Lapham, Nola Campbell, Debbie Steinhardt and Kerry Wardle led the way for the Subs.Australian Junior representatives Nicole Beck, Amanda Skwarko and Ashleigh Dobbins all made their debuts at Open level and played extremely well.In other NTL preview action, the Suns Womens 30’s and ACT Womens 20’s were both knocked out in the semi finals of the Womens Open, perhaps indicating their preparations for NTL are well on track. In the Mixed division final the Guns, who had traveled from Bondi for the knockout, proved too strong for Off The Hook from Gosford.With South Queensland Sharks representatives Amy Fong, Tara Mako and Riki Best in the Guns lineup, as well as Tony Eltakchi and Brad Davids, they took the final 16-7.Despite the large scoreline, the final was action packed with Off the Hook’s quick stepping players such as Dylan Hennessey and twins John and Maurice Kennedy dazzling the crowd, as well as their opposition on several occasions.In the Mens B Grade final the Hookies Heroes from Temora defeated the Bowral Boys 11-6 for back-to-back titles in the division.In the Mixed B Grade final Rip It from Penrith defeated the Incredibles 8-5 in the final.Reperchage Finals results:Womens division: Suns Womens 40’s team def the Chosen Few from Greenfield Park 11-2Mens B division: Mush Nush from Yass defeated the DHL Redbacks from Yass 8-7 Mixed A division: UNSW Bullets defeated the Misfits from Dapto 12-5Mixed B divisions: Bowral Brumbies defeated the Chosen Few 9-6Tournament organisers would like to thank the referees who all did a fantastic job over the weekend and helped the event continue it’s success. The Knockout was a great benefit for the Yass community bringing an estimated $250,000 in business to the area.last_img read more

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Early genome catastrophes can lead to development of lung cancer in nonsmokers

first_imgThe research team plans to further focus on the molecular mechanisms that stimulate complex rearrangements in the body, through screening the genomic structures of fusion genes in other cancer types.Source:The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)Journal reference:Kim, Y.T. et al. (2019) Tracing Oncogene Rearrangements in the Mutational History of Lung Adenocarcinoma. Cell. doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2019.05.013. We hope this work will help us get one step closer to precision medicine for lung cancer patients.” Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)May 31 2019Catastrophic rearrangements in the genome occurring as early as childhood and adolescence can lead to the development of lung cancer in later years in non-smokers. This finding, published in Cell, helps explain how some non-smoking-related lung cancers develop.Researchers at KAIST, Seoul National University and their collaborators confirmed that gene fusions in non-smokers mostly occur early on, sometimes as early as childhood or adolescence, and on average about three decades before cancer is diagnosed. The study showed that these mutant lung cells, harboring oncogenic seeds, remain dormant for several decades until a number of further mutations accumulate sufficiently for progression into cancer. This is the first study to reveal the landscape of genome structural variations in lung adenocarcinoma.Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and lung adenocarcinoma is its most common type. Most lung adenocarcinomas are associated with chronic smoking, but about a fourth develop in non-smokers. Precisely what happens in non-smokers for this cancer to develop is not clearly understood.Researchers analyzed the genomes of 138 lung adenocarcinoma patients, including smokers and non-smokers, with whole-genome sequencing technologies. They explored DNA damage that induced neoplastic transformation.Lung adenocarcinomas that originated from chronic smoking, referred to as signature 4-high (S4-high) cancers in the study, showed several distinguishing features compared to smoking-unrelated cancers (S4-low).People in the S4-high group were largely older, men and had more frequent mutations in a cancer-related gene called KRAS. Cancer genomes in the S4-high group were hypermutated with simple mutational classes, such as the substitution, insertion, or deletion of a single base, the building block of DNA.But the story was very different in the S4-low group. Generally, mutational profiles in this group were much more silent than the S4-high group. However, all cancer-related gene fusions, which are abnormally activated from the merging of two originally separate genes, were exclusively observed in the S4-low group.Related StoriesTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerSpecial blood test may predict relapse risk for breast cancer patientsStudy: Nearly a quarter of low-risk thyroid cancer patients receive more treatment than necessaryThe patterns of genomic structural changes underlying gene fusions suggest that about three in four cases of gene fusions emerged from a single cellular crisis causing massive genomic fragmentation and subsequent imprecise repair in normal lung epithelium.Most strikingly, these major genomic rearrangements, which led to the development of lung adenocarcinoma, are very likely to be acquired decades before cancer diagnosis. The researchers used genomic archaeology techniques to trace the timing of when the catastrophes took place.Researchers started this study seven years ago when they discovered the expression of the KIF5B-RET gene fusion in lung adenocarcinoma for the first time. Professor Young-Seok Ju, co-lead author from the Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering at KAIST says, “It is remarkable that oncogenesis can begin by a massive shattering of chromosomes early in life. Our study immediately raises a new question: What induces the mutational catastrophe in our normal lung epithelium.”Professor Young Tae Kim, co-lead author from Seoul National University says:last_img read more

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Largest study finds CTE in 6 of athletes and nonathletes

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jun 23 2019Nearly 6% of athletes and non-athletes were found to have the neurodegenerative disorder chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in the largest, and broadest, study conducted of the disease to date. The findings were published June 14 in the international journal Brain Pathology. Generally our findings point to CTE being more common in athletes and more common in football players, but this study is a bit more balanced and accurately reflects the general population compared to previous studies.”Lead author Kevin Bieniek, Ph.D., of UT Health San Antonio Dr. Bieniek led the research while at the Mayo Clinic before moving to Texas. He now directs the brain bank at the Glenn Biggs Institute for Alzheimer’s and Neurodegenerative Diseases, which is part of UT Health San Antonio.Unbiased screenCTE, linked with repetitive blows to the head, has been found in 80-99% of autopsied brains of pro football players. “Nobody has really looked at it from kind of an epidemiological perspective,” Dr. Bieniek said. “We compared people who played a sport with those who didn’t play. We studied both young and old people, and amateur players versus college and professional players. And we studied both men and women, which had not been done previously. What we aimed to do was an unbiased screen for CTE from all sorts of different cases.”Biographical information utilizedThe team scanned obituaries and high school yearbooks of 2,566 individuals whose brain autopsies are a part of the Mayo Clinic Tissue Registry. The study focused on a variety of contact sports: baseball, basketball, boxing, football, hockey, lacrosse, soccer and wrestling. Non-contact sports, such as golf and tennis, were excluded.This analysis identified 300 former athletes and 450 non-athletes. “We screened the brains of all of these cases for evidence of CTE in a blinded fashion, intentionally not knowing which brain tissue was related to which case,” Dr. Bieniek said.FindingsA small number of cases, 42, had CTE pathology (5.6% of the total). CTE was found in 27 athletes and 15 non-athletes, and in 41 men and one woman. American football had the highest frequency of CTE (15%) of the contact sports studied, with participation beyond high school resulting in the highest risk of developing CTE.Related StoriesStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with agingStudy offers clues about how to prevent brain inflammation in Alzheimer’sIT Faces the Digital Pathology Data Tsunami”The 42 cases, or 6%, is more of a grounded, realistic number,” Dr. Bieniek said. “That might not seem like a lot, but when you consider there are millions of youth, high school and collegiate athletes in the United States alone who play organized sports, it has the potential of being a significant public health issue. There are many ongoing questions regarding CTE pathology, however, and we don’t want to discourage sources of healthy physical and cardiovascular activity like these sports. Rather, we emphasize safe strategies to reduce the possibility of head injuries and properly treat them when they are sustained.”Non-athletes’ casesThe identification of 15 CTE cases in non-athletes raises interesting questions, Dr. Bieniek said. “Did these people have trauma from another source?” he asked. “Were they actually athletes and we were unable to detect it from biographical information? Is there another disease with similar features?”Cases with CTE tended to be a bit older than the cases without it, and many CTE cases also showed evidence of Alzheimer’s disease. “At the Glenn Biggs Institute, we study the concept of multiple neurodegenerative disorders happening within the brain of a person who has dementia,” Dr. Bieniek said.The crucial role of donors”This is an important national study led by our brain bank director, Dr. Bieniek,” said Sudha Seshadri, M.D., professor of neurology at UT Health San Antonio and director of the Glenn Biggs Institute. “We have a great team of scientists at the Biggs Institute, and the brain bank is key to the research aims of these investigators. We are so grateful for the many patients and normal older persons who have signed on to be brain donors after their death. The program runs 24/7/365, is free to the family, and gives the family the peace and knowledge of a definitive diagnosis for their loved one’s condition.”Several studies related to traumatic brain injuries and CTE by Dr. Bieniek and his colleagues are currently ongoing at UT Health San Antonio, including how certain genetic variants might protect or put a person at higher risk for developing CTE. Source:University of Texas Health Science Center at San AntonioJournal reference:Bieniek, K.F. et al. (2019) Association between contact sports participation and chronic traumatic encephalopathy: a retrospective cohort study. Brain Pathology. doi.org/10.1111/bpa.12757.last_img read more

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France sees red after Spanish rose wine found in domestic bottles

first_img © 2018 AFP Summer is the ideal time for breaking out a bottle of rose, but fans of French wine might think twice after millions of bottles were found to contain less costly Spanish tipple instead. Explore further ‘Question of price’Tensions have long simmered between winegrowers on either side of the Pyrenees, with French producers often accusing their Spanish rivals of unfair competition.In recent years French protests have blocked Spanish trucks from bringing their wine into the country, with demonstrators emptying their loads onto highways.Production surpluses in Spain have pushed down prices there, making the country’s wines a better deal for consumers—and a tempting substitute for some French distributors.”It’s a question of price,” Jerome Despey, a winegrower in the southern Herault region and member of the FNSEA agricultural union, told AFP.The two countries’ agriculture ministers met in Paris last summer to try to end the conflict, leading to a series of measures aimed at limiting price volatility, Despey said.Price increases across Europe following weather-related grape harvest shortfalls last year have also helped ease tensions.”We need to keep up the pressure with these inspections so this kind of thing can’t happen again,” Despey said, urging the government to impose stricter labelling rules.Delphine Geny-Stephann, France’s junior economy minister, said she had asked the fraud agency “to continue carrying out regular inspections in the sector.” French winemakers emptying wine from a Spanish truck during a protest Le Boulon, ten kilometres forms the French-Spanish border, in April 2016 French farmers block refineries over palm oil importscenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: France sees red after Spanish rose wine found in domestic bottles (2018, July 9) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-07-france-red-spanish-rose-wine.html French investigators found that millions of bottles of rose actually contained Spanish wine France’s consumer fraud agency confirmed Monday that 70,000 hectolitres—the equivalent of 10 million bottles—of Spanish rose were falsely labelled as French vintages by hundreds of producers in 2016 and 2017.According to French daily Le Parisien, which first reported the findings, Spanish rose sold in bulk at the time for just 34 euro cents ($0.40) a litre compared with 75 to 90 cents for French rose.”We were alerted to the ‘Frenchification’ of Spanish wine at the end of 2015,” the consumer agency’s Alexandre Chevallier told the paper.”So we launched an inquiry at all levels, from producers to importers to restaurants and distributors,” he said.Twenty-two percent of the businesses subjected to controls in 2016 and 15 percent in 2017—a total of 743 establishments—were cited for trying to present the foreign wine as French, he explained. Some blatantly passed it off as French, as was the case for bottles showing drawings of French-sounding but fictitious castles, or wines sold by the glass in some restaurants.Others were more subtle, putting “Produced in France” on the front label but “European Community wine” on the back, or embellishing bottles with national symbols like the heraldic lily or a ribbon in the blue, white and red of the French flag.Misleading wine drinkers is no small matter in France: producers could face fraud lawsuits that carry penalties of up to two years in prison and 300,000 euros in fines.last_img read more

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