Tag: 南京夜网梧桐

The Africa you never see

first_img23 October 2006In the waiting area of a large office complex in Accra, Ghana, it’s standing room only as citizens with bundles of cash line up to buy shares of a mutual fund that has yielded an average 60% annually for the past seven years.Africa: Open for BusinessCarol Pineau, a journalist with more than 10 years’ experience reporting on Africa, is the producer and director of the film Africa: Open for Business, which aired worldwide on the BBC in May 2006 and has been released for purchase on DVD at Africa: Open for Business.They’re entrusting their hard-earned cash to a local company called Databank, which invests in stock markets in Ghana, Nigeria, Botswana and Kenya that consistently rank among the world’s top growth markets.Chances are you haven’t read or heard anything about Databank in your daily newspaper or on the evening news, where the little coverage of Africa that’s offered focuses almost exclusively on the negative – the virulent spread of HIV/Aids, genocide in Darfur, the chaos of Zimbabwe.Yes, Africa is a land of wars, poverty and corruption. The situation in places like Darfur, Sudan desperately cries out for more media attention and international action.But Africa is also a land of stock markets, high rises, Internet cafes and a growing middle class. This is the part of Africa that functions. And this Africa also needs media attention, if it’s to have any chance of fully joining the global economy.Africa’s media image comes at a high cost – even, at the extreme, the cost of lives. Stories about hardship and tragedy aim to tug at our heartstrings, getting us to dig into our pockets or urge Congress to send more aid.But no country or region ever developed thanks to aid alone. Investment, and the job and wealth creation it generates, is the only road to lasting development. That’s how China, India and the Asian Tigers did it.Highest return on FDI in the worldYet while Africa, according to the US government’s Overseas Private Investment Corporation, offers the highest return in the world on foreign direct investment, it attracts the least.Unless investors see the Africa that’s worthy of investment, they won’t put their money into it. And that lack of investment translates into job stagnation, continued poverty and limited access to education and health care.Consider a few facts. The Ghana Stock Exchange regularly tops the list of the world’s highest-performing stock markets. Botswana, with its A+ credit rating, boasts one of the highest per capita government savings rates in the world, topped only by Singapore and a handful of other fiscally prudent nations.Cellphones are making phenomenal profits on the continent. Brand-name companies like Coca-Cola, GM, Caterpillar and Citibank have invested in Africa for years and are quite bullish on the future.Caricaturing a continentThe failure to show this side of Africa creates a one-dimensional caricature of a complex continent. Imagine if 9/11, the Oklahoma City bombing and school shootings were all that the rest of the world knew about America.I recently produced a documentary on entrepreneurship and private enterprise in Africa. Throughout the year-long process, I came to realise how all of us in the media – even those with a true love of the continent – portray it in a way that’s truly to its detriment.The first cameraman I called to film the documentary laughed and said, “Business and Africa, aren’t those contradictory terms?” The second got excited imagining heart-warming images of women’s co-ops and market stalls brimming with rustic crafts. Several friends simply assumed I was doing a documentary on Aids. After all, what else does one film in Africa?The little-known fact is that businesses are thriving throughout Africa. With good governance and sound fiscal policies, countries like Botswana, Ghana, Uganda, Senegal and many more are bustling, their economies growing at surprisingly robust rates.Somalia: surprise, surprisePrivate enterprise is not just limited to the well-behaved nations. You can’t find a more war-ravaged land than Somalia, which has been without a central government for more than a decade.The big surprise? Private enterprise is flourishing. Mogadishu has the cheapest cellphone rates on the continent, mostly due to no government intervention. In the northern city of Hargeysa, the markets sell the latest satellite phone technology. The electricity works.When the state collapsed in 1991, the national airline went out of business. Today, there are five private carriers and price wars keep the cost of tickets down. This is not the Somalia you see in the media.Obviously life there would be dramatically improved by good governance – or even just some governance – but it’s also true that, through resilience and resourcefulness, Somalis have been able to create a functioning society.African solutionsMost African businesses suffer from an extreme lack of infrastructure, but the people I met were too determined to let this stop them. It just costs them more. Without reliable electricity, most businesses have to use generators. They have to dig bore-holes for a dependable water source. Telephone lines are notoriously out of service, but cellphones are filling the gap.Throughout Africa, what I found was a private sector working hard to find African solutions to African problems.One example that will always stick in my mind is the CEO of Vodacom Congo, the largest cellphone company in that country. Alieu Conteh started his business while the civil war was still raging. With rebel troops closing in on the airport in Kinshasa, no foreign manufacturer would send in a cell phone tower, so Conteh got locals to collect scrap metal, which they welded together to build one. That tower still stands today.As I interviewed successful entrepreneurs, I was continually astounded by their ingenuity, creativity and steadfastness. These people are the future of the continent. They are the ones we should be talking to about how to move Africa forward.Obsession with victims, savioursInstead, the media concentrates on victims or government officials, and as anyone who has worked in Africa knows, government is more often a part of the problem than of the solution.When the foreign media descend on the latest crisis, the person they look to interview is invariably the foreign saviour, an aid worker from the United States or Europe. African saviours are everywhere, delivering aid on the ground. But they don’t seem to be in our cultural belief system.It’s not just the media, either. Look at the literature put out by almost any non-governmental organisation. The better ones show images of smiling African children – smiling because they have been helped by the NGO. The worst promote the extended-belly, flies-on-the-face cliche of Africa, hoping that the pain of seeing those images will fill their coffers. “We hawk poverty”, one NGO worker admitted to me.Last November, ABC’s “Primetime Live” aired a special on Britain’s Prince Harry and his work with Aids children in Lesotho. The segment, titled “The Forgotten Kingdom: Prince Harry in Lesotho”, painted the tiny nation as a desperate, desolate place. The programme’s message was clear: This helpless nation at last had a knight – or prince – in shining armour.By the time the charity addresses came up at the end, you were ready to give, and that’s good. Lesotho needs help with its Aids problem. But would it really have hurt the story to add that this land-locked nation with few natural resources has jump-started its economy by aggressively courting foreign investment?The reality is that it’s anything but a “forgotten kingdom”, as a dramatic increase in exports has made it the top beneficiary of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA), a duty-free, quota-free US-Africa trade agreement. More than 50 000 people have gotten jobs through the country’s initiatives.Couldn’t the programme have portrayed an African country that was in need of assistance, but was neither helpless nor a victim?Whose portrait of Africa?
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Raman Singh struck deal with Naxals: Cong.

first_imgSenior Congress leader Digvijaya Singh on Tuesday accused Chhattisgarh Chief Minister Raman Singh and other BJP leaders, who win elections from Naxalism-affected areas, of striking a “deal” with the guerrillas.“I have said this before and am repeating, that Raman Singh and all those BJP leaders who have won from Naxalism-hit areas have struck a deal with Naxals and there is some exchange between them,” he said.Mr. Singh said Naxalism could not be wiped out till the State government took tribals and those living in these areas into confidence and spoke to them. “You cannot end Naxalism till the time you talk to all,” he said.The “inability” of the State government in fighting Naxalism lay in the “lack of will” of the Chief Minister, Congress spokesperson Randeep Surjewala said. He took a swipe at BJP president Amit Shah over his party’s expansion plan.last_img read more

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Odisha House nod for Legislative Council

first_imgA resolution seeking creation of a Legislative Council in Odisha was passed in the State Assembly on Thursday.The resolution moved by State Parliamentary Affairs Minister Bikram Keshari Arukha was passed with as many as 104 of the total 147 legislators casting their votes in its favour. The ruling Biju Janata Dal has 117 members in the House.The legislators of opposition Congress and BJP staged a walkout before the resolution was put to vote. While Congress had opposed the idea of creation of the Council, the BJP had alleged that the government was moving ahead with the proposal to accommodate the sitting BJD legislators who will not be given tickets to contest the 2019 elections.The resolution will be sent to the Centre for approval of Parliament to facilitate creation of the Legislative Council.Wider consultationsAfter the passing of the resolution, Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik said the creation of the Council will be of great help as wider consultations are required to accelerate the growth momentum that the State has picked up.A proposal for creation of the Legislative Council in Odisha was passed by the State Cabinet on August 24.The proposed Council will have 49 members, which is one-third of the total members of the State Assembly.The Odisha government had set up a committee in 2015 to study the Legislative Councils in other States and recommend for establishment of one in the State.last_img read more

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Ahead of everyone

first_imgMOST READ Ateneo, La Salle gather momentum for coming crucial clash Ed Daquioag and Rey Nambatac heeded that call and mounted sterling performances, and led the Painters to a 91-85 decision of the Batang Pier at Mall of Asia Arena to become the first semifinalists in the PBA Philippine Cup.No. 1 Phoenix Pulse later followed suit, destroying eighth-ranked Alaska, 91-76, in the nightcap.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsJason Perkins scored a career-high 31 points that went with nine rebounds as the Fuel Masters posted the one-sided win for the franchise’s first semifinal stint.“Before the game started, I told the players that the only thing I’m worried about is our first quarter,” Garcia told reporters, citing that they haven’t played any competitive basketball—even a tuneup at that—since defeating Meralco in their final elimination round game on March 15. The winner of the Ginebra-Magnolia series advances to the survivor of the Phoenix Pulse-Alaska quarterfinal, which the Fuel Masters are trying to wrap up at press time.Rain or Shine drew significant contributions from old reliables Beau Belga, who had 13 points, and Gabe Norwood, who finished with eight.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Daquioag and Nambatac had solid outings coming off the bench, with Daquioag finishing with a team-best 15 points on an efficient 71 percent shooting.Nambatac, meanwhile, chipped in with 14 more.“They were guarding James (Yap) throughout the whole game so it paved the way for the other players to step up,” Garcia said. “We know how dangerous the guards of GlobalPort have been and Mo (Tautuaa) has become a totally different player from the first time he came into the league. We really had problems matchup wise.”The second-ranked Painters now await the winner of the San Miguel Beer-TNT series, which the Beermen lead, 1-0, and can wrap up on Monday in the 7 p.m. game at Smart Araneta Coliseum in Cubao.Barangay Ginebra is also leading sister team Magnolia in the other best-of-three series, with the Gin Kings to also take the first of two shots at closing out the Hotshots in the 4:30 p.m. contest.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Hontiveros presses for security audit of national power grid Philippine Arena Interchange inaugurated DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anewcenter_img PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Coach Caloy Garcia’s biggest worry for Rain or Shine coming into Sunday night was how his Elasto Painters would be opening their quarterfinal match against NorthPort coming off a long break.He had such a simple marching order that his charges followed to the letter: “At any given time, step up.”ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Duterte wants probe of SEA Games mess View commentslast_img read more

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GALLERY: 5-peat! San Miguel bags another PBA Philippine Cup crown

first_imgCayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES Duterte wants probe of SEA Games mess PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss READ: San Miguel makes history with 5th straight Philippine Cup title, outlasts Magnolia in Game 7Relive San Miguel’s celebration of its latest title through these photos:FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netJune Mar Fajardo wins another finals MVP award. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.net Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew ‘Rebel attack’ no cause for concern-PNP, AFP Two-day strike in Bicol fails to cripple transport Warriors look to build off strong, well-balanced Game 1 Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venue Catholic schools seek legislated pay hike, too Struggling mightily and pushed to their limit by a gutsy Magnolia side, the San Miguel Beermen still found a way to win and extend their reign in the PBA Philippine Cup for a historic fifth straight year.It was an emotional night for the Beermen, who went through the wringer against the Hotshots with the championship decided in the final minute of Game 7.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ View commentslast_img read more

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Force Majeure Declared at Hariga and Zuetina Ports

first_imgzoomIllustration. Image Courtesy: Pixabay under CC0 Creative Commons license Libya’s National Oil Corporation (NOC) declared force majeure on crude oil loading at Hariga and Zuetina oil terminals on Monday, July 2, 2018. The announcement follows suspension of loading at the Ras Lanuf and Es Sider terminals.The force majeure is being imposed in line with the order of the Libyan National Army (LNA) General Command to prohibit ports from receiveing allocated shipments. “Despite our warning of the consequences and attempts to reason with the LNA General Command, two legitimate allocations were blocked from loading at Hariga and Zuetina this weekend. The storage tanks are full and production will now go offline,” NOC Chairman Eng Mustafa Sanalla, said.NOC called on the LNA General Command to lift the blockade and allow NOC to handle oil shipments.The oil company said that the total daily production loss amounts to 850,000 bpd of crude, 710 million standard cubic feet per day (MMSCFD) of natural gas, and more than 20,000 bpd of condensate.The total daily revenue loss associated with the shutdown is estimated at USD 67.4 million. The financial loss to the public purse since the attack on Es Sidra and Ras Lanuf on June 14 is said to be over USD 650 million.last_img read more

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