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Gifford Medical receives $40,000 grant from Avon Breast Health Outreach Program

first_imgGifford Healthcare,The Avon Breast Health Outreach Program has awarded a $40,000 grant for 2011 to Gifford Medical Center to increase awareness of the life-saving benefits of early detection of breast cancer.The Avon Breast Health Outreach supports community-based, non-profit breast health programs across the country and is part of the Avon Foundation for Women, the largest corporate philanthropy dedicated to women’s causes globally.This is the 10th consecutive year that Gifford’s Breast Health Program has received funding from the Foundation, resulting in a total of more than $380,000 invested regionally to increase awareness of the life saving benefits of mammograms and clinical breast exams.The only Vermont recipient, Gifford was selected as one of 126 grantees nationwide in 2011, when a total of $5.2 million was awarded. Organizations like Gifford are chosen based on their ability to effectively reach women, particularly minority, low-income and older women, who are often medically underserved.Through the grant, Gifford Breast Care Coordinator Jane Harrness travels the state speaking to women at events like the upcoming Vermont Farm Show in Barre, many of the state’s county fairs, senior centers, prisons, churches, women’s conferences and more spreading the message of early detection and sharing information on resources like Ladies First.Since Gifford first received the grant in 2002, it has provided more than 4,000 mammograms and more than 3,200 clinical breast exam through the program, and referred countless others to hospitals in their region of the state for care. In 2010 alone, Harrness spoke to nearly 6,500 Vermonters about having annual mammograms after age 40, annual clinical breast exams and doing self-breast exams so women know what is normal for them.Gifford’s program also expanded in 2010 to include a second breast care educator, radiology technologist Cheryl Manns. Additionally, Brittany Ward, also a radiology technologist, coordinates the hospital’s new Patient Care Navigator Program. This program is a resource for women facing breast biopsies following abnormal mammograms. Ward helps schedule appointments, answer questions and is with patients throughout the biopsy process.While most breast biopsies do not result in a cancer diagnosis, breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women in the United States and in Vermont. It’s also the nation’s leading single cause of death overall in women between the ages of 40 and 55. According to the Vermont Department of Health, about 473 breast cancer cases are diagnosed among Vermont women each year. About 92 each year die from the disease.Nationwide, there is a new diagnosis every three minutes. While advances have been made in prevention, diagnosis, treatment and cure, early detection still affords the best opportunity for successful treatment. According to the Avon Foundation, programs such as Gifford’s help ensure that all women have access to early detection information and options, even poor and medically underserved women.Gifford representatives said they appreciate the strides the medical center has made thanks to the Avon Foundation’s fund raising efforts and generosity.‘We are so pleased that the Avon Foundation shares our mission of improving health and has chosen to support our program for a 10th consecutive year. This grant allows us to educate women on their breast cancer risk, help them access the health care system and ‘ perhaps most importantly in today’s busy society ‘ remind them to make their own health care a priority, for themselves and for their families,’ said Harrness.Since 1993, the Avon Foundation has awarded more than 1,425 grants and a total of nearly $60 million to community-based breast health programs across the United States. These programs are dedicated to educating underserved women about breast cancer and linking them to early detection screening services.***The Avon Foundation for Women and Breast Cancer CrusadeThe Avon Foundation for Women, an accredited 501(c)(3) public charity, was founded in 1955 to improve the lives of women and today is the world’s largest corporate-affiliated philanthropy focused on issues that matter most to women. Avon philanthropy focuses its funding on breast cancer research and access to care, efforts to reduce domestic and gender violence, its women’s environmental movement to nurture nature, and efforts to provide relief and recovery in times of major natural disasters and emergencies. Since the Avon Breast Cancer Crusade launched in 1992, Avon breast cancer programs in more than 50 countries have raised almost $700 million for research and advancing advance access to care, regardless of a person’s ability to pay. In addition to receiving generous support from Avon Products, Inc., and its sale of Avon ‘pink ribbon’ products, the Foundation raises funds through a variety of events and walks, such as the U.S. Avon Walk for Breast Cancer series, which is the Foundation’s largest fund-raising.The Avon Breast Health Outreach ProgramThe Avon Breast Health Outreach Program is administered by Cicatelli Associates Inc. to support community-based, non-profit breast health programs across the country. The Fund’s National Advisory Board selected the Breast Health Program at Gifford Medical Center as one of 126 grant recipients nationwide in the 2011 cycle of Avon Foundation Breast Care Fund grants. These organizations were chosen based on their ability to effectively reach women, particularly minority, low-income, and older women, who are often medically underserved.Gifford Medical CenterGifford Medical Center in Randolph, Vt., is a community hospital with family health centers in Bethel, Chelsea, Rochester and Sharon and specialty services throughout the central Vermont. Gifford is a full-service, non-profit hospital with a 24-hour emergency department, a 25-bed inpatient unit and a Transitional Care Unit. Gifford has a day care as well an adult day care and an award-winning 30-bed nursing home, the Menig Extended Care Facility, which opened in 1998 on the main campus. The Birthing Center, established in 1977, was the first in Vermont to offer an alternative to the traditional hospital-based deliveries and continues to be a leader in midwifery and family-centered care.Designated as a Critical Access Hospital, Gifford’s mission is to improve individuals’ and community health by providing and assuring access to affordable and high-quality health care in Gifford’s service area.last_img read more

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EIA: Renewables and Gas Continue to Overtake Coal

first_imgEIA: Renewables and Gas Continue to Overtake Coal FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Natural gas and renewables combined to fuel more than half of U.S. power generation in April. Coal’s share of generation, which saw declines in February and March, dipped to 24%.According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s latest “Electric Power Monthly” released June 25, utility-scale generation net of hydroelectric pumped storage increased 2.9% year over year in April to 302.6 million MWh.Over the same period, gas-fired generation climbed 16.0% to 100.0 million MWh, accounting for 33.0% of the net total. Meanwhile, coal-fired generation declined 9.9% versus the prior-year period to 73.5 million MWh, to account for 24.3% of the nation’s electricity.Renewable output climbed 0.5% year over year to 66.6 million MWh as growth among renewable resources was mixed.Year-to-date through April, utility-scale generation climbed 4.5% to 1.30 billion MWh, with coal supplying 27.2% of the nation’s power and natural gas at a 31.4% share. So far, renewable generation has supplied 19.5% of the nation’s power, compared with 19.8% a year earlier.Over the same period, coal-fired generation declined 4.9% year over year to 354.9 million MWh, while gas-fired generation climbed 16.0% to 409.8 million MWh. Meanwhile, renewable generation grew 2.9% to 254.2 million MWh.More ($): Natural gas, renewables combined for 55% of US power generation in Aprillast_img read more

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Poland’s largest utility talking about long-term coal phaseout, green energy transition

first_imgPoland’s largest utility talking about long-term coal phaseout, green energy transition FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Platts:Poland’s largest power utility Polska Grupa Energetyczna (PGE) is targeting phasing out its coal-fired power station fleet by 2040-2045, company officials told S&P Global Platts on June 2.“We’re talking about withdrawing the entire hard coal and lignite fleet in 20-25 years,” said Maciej Burny, director of the company’s Brussels office. “In Poland, we’re thinking of a similar direction to the one that Germany is taking. If you look at the timeframe for both countries it is quite comparable. The Germans are doing it in 2038 with a smaller coal base in the energy mix,” he said.Deputy chief executive for corporate affairs Pawel Cioch said PGE planned to publish a 10-year strategy in three months’ time that will rest on three pillars ‒ offshore and onshore wind and PV solar. “Our green transition is a fact, this is not just talking,” he said.The strategy would provide a clear timeline for decommissioning coal assets. “Our coal phase-out plan will lay out the lifetimes of the existing assets. Many of them will be decommissioned much sooner than 2045 due to lower efficiency and technical degradation,” Burny said.The last coal assets to be decommissioned will be two 900 MW units commissioned last year at Opole and a 490 MW lignite unit at Turow that is scheduled to be commissioned later this year. Burny said those units’ viability over the next 25 years would depend on how carbon prices evolved, but guaranteed 15-year capacity market payments should help them remain profitable for longer.PGE’s generation is dominated by lignite and hard coal. In the first quarter of this year, the fuels accounted for 84% of the company’s generation despite a 10 percentage point year-on-year fall in lignite utilization. In 2015-2018, the company spent 96% of its investment outlays, or Zloty 27.9 billion ($7.1 billion), in acquiring, renovating or building coal and lignite generation assets, as well as on gas co-generation plants.The company’s change of direction was prompted by rising carbon prices and higher EU emissions targets. “Previously, there was perhaps a notion to prolong difficult decisions. There were signs that things may change in a few years. Now, we see that this is not the way forward. We either change now or never,” Burny said.[Henry Edwardes-Evans, Adam Easton]More: Interview: EU policies prompt Poland’s PGE to pursue green transitionlast_img read more

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Campaign Donations Reflect the Sharp Split in Congress Among Republicans

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By Derek Willis, ProPublicaThis story was co-published with The Daily Beast.The Republican split that defines this year’s presidential campaign has been on display in Congress for years, with the most conservative wing battling party leaders on issues from spending to immigration.A ProPublica analysis of campaign donations highlights just how profound this gap has become in the House of Representatives.The analysis shows that the Republican leadership, including Speaker Paul Ryan and Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, raises money from a vastly different set of political action committees than members further to the right. In fact, the donor bases for Ryan and McCarthy are actually more similar to some Democrats than to their colleagues in the main conservative grouping, the Freedom Caucus.The fundraising disparity stokes the divisive atmosphere in Congress, reinforcing policy differences and sometimes affecting the outcome of legislation in surprising ways.For example, when a Republican-backed plan to ease a campaign finance rule evaporated in Congress, it was the most conservative GOP lawmakers in the House who joined with liberal Democrats to get it killed. ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for their newsletter. Related stories: For more of ProPublica’s coverage of politics and lobbying, check out our ongoing series, The Breakdown. The provision, which died in December, was initiated by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and was included in a must-pass spending bill. It would have eliminated caps on the money a national party committee can spend in coordination with a candidate.The caps were originally meant to reduce the amount of outside cash flowing directly to advocacy for a particular candidate. Those in favor of lifting the restrictions say they are outmoded in the increasingly wild world of campaign finance and effectively give less-accountable outside groups like super PACs more influence than traditional parties.Many Democrats argued that eliminating the caps would have opened the spigot to even more big money in politics. For conservatives, the reason to oppose the McConnell plan was different: It might have helped Republican leaders quash internal dissenters.With a bigger campaign war chest raised from donors who support mainstream Republicans, the party would find it easier to select and back its favored House candidates. “The McConnell rider provides preferential treatment to the Washington establishment,” the Conservative Action Project, a group led by former Attorney General Edwin Meese, wrote in appealing to like-minded lawmakers to fight the measure.The differences in donor bases affect other policy debates, said Dave Brat of Virginia, a Freedom Caucus member who defeated then-Majority Leader Eric Cantor in the 2014 primary and went on to take his seat. For instance, he said, conservatives lost their fight to defund the U.S. Export-Import Bank last year in part because the companies that benefit from the bank won over Republicans and Democrats who received campaign contributions from those firms.The disparity is “a huge deal,” Brat said.ProPublica’s analysis used a calculation called cosine similarity to compare each House members’ donors to others; two members with an identical set of donors would receive a score of 1, while two with no PAC donors in common would get a score of 0.The degree of similarity between Ryan’s 2014 PAC donors and those of Freedom Caucus members Justin Amash of Michigan and Ted Yoho of Florida was close to nil: 0.03 and 0.16. Tim Huelskamp, a Kansas Republican who lost his seat on the House Agriculture Committee in 2012 for his votes against leadership, had few PAC donors in common with Ryan (a score of 0.15) or any other House colleague in 2014: his highest score was 0.3, with fellow Kansan Mike Pompeo.PAC donors to House Majority Leader McCarthy, of California, were more like Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer’s (0.53 score) than they were those of Ohio Republican Jim Jordan, who heads the Freedom Caucus (0.31).The gap between the leadership and insurgents has widened since 2008. That year, McCarthy’s PAC donors were more similar to those of Michele Bachmann, the former Minnesota congresswoman who founded the House’s Tea Party caucus, than they were to PACs that gave to then-Majority Leader Cantor or then-Speaker John Boehner. By the end of 2014, the gulf between McCarthy and the conservatives was much wider: all House GOP leaders, and even 11House Democrats, had PAC donors more similar to McCarthy’s than any member of the Freedom Caucus.var pymParent = new pym.Parent(‘rankings-iframe’, ‘https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/donor-differences?layout=embed’, {});Source: ProPublica analysis of Federal Election Commission data.Credit: Sisi Wei and Derek Willis.The donors that typically back House leaders are large corporate PACs with broad interests before Congress. They include the Automotive Free Trade International PAC, which represents American dealers of foreign car manufacturers. The PAC gives hundreds of thousands of dollars to Republican candidates, of which just $11,500 went to three dozen Freedom Caucus members during the 2014 cycle. On the other hand, none of the leaders received contributions from the Citizens United Political Victory Fund, which is one of the top overall donors to Freedom Caucus members.The two factions do have some PAC donors in common, such as the Koch Industries PAC, which gave $201,500 to 36 members of the House Freedom Caucus identified by the Pew Research Center during the last election. The KochPAC gave more than $1.4 million to Republican House candidates, including its leaders.But even in cases where the same PAC backs both camps, the amounts are often lopsided, with less money going to Freedom Caucus members, many of who are relatively junior lawmakers. The Home Depot PAC, for example, gave the maximum $10,000 to scores of lawmakers’ campaigns in 2014; only one of them, Barry Loudermilk of Georgia, where Home Depot has its headquarters, is a Freedom Caucus member. Other members of the Freedom Caucus received donations from the PAC, but not for the maximum amount.Stephen Holmes, a spokesman for Home Depot, said many factors go into the company’s PAC giving, but caucus membership wasn’t one of them.The failure of McConnell’s plan to lift the caps on party spending shows how the source of lawmakers’ contributions influences their votes. Republicans generally have voted in favor of looser rules on raising and spending campaign money, especially since the passage of the 2002 McCain-Feingold law that banned national parties from collecting unlimited contributions. Rick Hasen, a University of California-Irvine law professor who studies campaign finance and elections, said it’s notable that the Freedom Caucus pushed to preserve the party restrictions.“Sometimes,” Hasen said, “self-interest can trump ideology.”last_img read more

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Artists’ eccentric Sunnybank house has walls of bookshelves and a pink bathroom

first_imgThe kitchen has secret cabinets.An update of the kitchen also saw secret storage space.“I have a secret cupboard. It doesn’t look like a cupboard but it has a power point so I can charge devices without cords hanging out everywhere,” Ms Fietcher said.She said they had also enjoyed time playing with their children and dogs at a reserve that backs onto their property and that they would miss living there. The house at 45 Coolinda St, Sunnybank, is for sale.WHAT happens when a bibliophile and a potter buy a house together?Bright coloured walls of different textures and extreme bookshelves are the result of Corinne Fietcher and Clement Joseph’s artistic desires. This is a booklover’s paradise!More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus15 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market15 hours agoMs Fietcher is a librarian and also has a degree in Fine Arts, and her husband a nurse by trade, but an amateur potter at home.So naturally, when they renovated the 45 Coolinda St home, they would turn it into their creative sanctuary.They built bookshelves that spanned entire walls, landscaped the property, replaced the roof and added solar. Their niece said they should paint the walls pink — so they did!They even painted the bathroom pink, to the excitement of Ms Fietcher’s niece.“My niece said we should paint it pink, so I did,” she said.“When you’ve got an older place, you can indulge yourself in that kind of thing (and) we thought she would get a kick out of it for a few years.”center_img Outdoors is landscaped, and under the house is Mr Joseph’s pottery area.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:34Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:34 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenWhy The Block has been such a success00:35 The walls in the lounge have a variety of colours and textures.This eccentric yet delightful Sunnybank residence has been home to the couple for the past seven years, who bought it for the convenience of the location.“We saw a lot of potential in it and as we had two teenage children at the time … we liked there were buses, trains and the ability for them to ride bikes,” Ms Fietcher said.“It meant they could be independent and get themselves from point A to B.”last_img read more

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Osborn keeps Lincoln County streak alive

first_imgBy Kelly NinasNORTH PLATTE, Neb. (June 11) – The oval had many racing grooves for the competitors to chal­lenge for supremacy at Lincoln County Raceway Saturday evening. Finding the fastest grooves to were Colton Osborn, Zach Schultz, Casey Werkmeister, Jacob Olmstead and Andrew Baumgardner as all found themselves in the winner’s circle at the end of the evening.Continuing his streak was Osborn, as he captured yet another Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modi­fied victory. Osborn started in the third row and took little time to become in the lead group. He passed Dave Pedersen on the 10th lap and never looked back.Pedersen ended as the runner-up and Jay Steffens was third.It was a family battle at the front of the field during the final laps of the Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMod feature with Zach and Dillon Schultz going head-to-head. Zach Schultz took the lead from the onset and was able to avoid all challenges throughout the feature event to claim the check­ered flag and victory.Zach Schultz was stalked by his brother Dillon during the final laps, but Dillon wasn’t able to get past and was forced to settle with runner-up accolades after starting in the fourth row. Brandon Clough was third.For the second week in a row, the most competitive feature event came in the IMCA Sunoco Stock Car division. Leading the way for the final four laps after battling through traffic, Casey Werk­meister crossed the finish line first to score the victory.Werkmeister had started in the fifth row. Kyle Clough recovered quite nicely after losing the lead to finish second. Third was Bob Hoing.Missing out on the heat race did nothing to slow Jacob Olmstead during the IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stock feature, where he snared the lead at the halfway point and never looked back to earn the win. The battle for second place came down to the final inches of the race, with Zach Olmstead edging Robbie Kosmacek by the slimmest of margins at the finish line.Keeping it in the family, Andrew Baumgardner drove his father’s car to the winner’s circle after winning the Mach-1 Sport Compact feature.last_img read more

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Quick releases email addressing diversity issues

first_imgProvost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Michael Quick, sent out a memorandum to the USC community on Monday in response to the various acts of bias and disrespect against minorities at USC.Titled “Access and Opportunity, Diversity and Inclusion,” the memorandum comes after the Undergraduate Student Government’s resolution on campus climate that was passed Tuesday and recent demonstrations on campus urging for student voices to be heard on campus diversity issues.The resolution called for action from the University administration following recent incidents related to racial bias. It specifically asked for a $100 million fund to support underrepresented students, additional resources for cultural centers on campus, mandatory diversity training and the hiring of a vice president for diversity, equity and inclusion, among other things.Quick wrote that he was touched by the student voices, both at USC and at other universities, that have stood up and called for improvement at their institutions. He argued that since its earliest days, USC has shown a commitment to diversity because of its imperative role in learning.“In the current historical context, that commitment reflects our desire to enrich learning by embracing a broad range of ideas and perspectives, our moral support for the cause of social justice, and our realization, in today’s increasingly global context, that the more diverse the community, the greater its potential for economic and cultural prosperity,” he wrote in the memorandum.When Quick became provost in April 2015, he outlined his commitment to access and opportunity as one of the four pillars he was going to focus on. He said he’s recently been brainstorming with other members of the Trojan community on ways to increase their commitment to these ideals.Quick, along with President C. L. Max Nikias and the leadership at USC, have outlined a series of steps that will improve campus climate and enhance access and opportunity.The first point said the provost is establishing a diversity task force, which will be co-chaired by Varun Soni, the dean of Religious Life, and Ainsley Carry, vice president for Student Affairs.The force will aim to gather ideas from the campus leaders on how to improve and provide suggestions to various campus units, like the Department of Public Safety and USC Housing, among others.Second, a series of open forums moderated by Professors Tara McPherson and George Sanchez will, like Quick wrote, “recognize criticism and complaint as a resource rather than as a problem.”Quick said he will be making a symposium series with community leaders sharing their stance on equity and diversity with students. In the memorandum, Quick invited students to suggest possible speakers and ideas for these panels.The task force also looks to identify diversity liaisons between the school deans and their faculty that can best address the needs of the community.“Given the breadth of this University, I believe this broad approach will be the most effective in addressing these issues,” Quick wrote.The memorandum also said a strategic planning process will chart a course for the USC community over the next several of years.USC’s Visions and Voices will also direct $100,000 of their budget per year to engage the community in diversity issues, according to Quick.Quick’s seventh point said there will be a $100,000 fund established that will go to supporting student programs and events that enhance diversity and inclusion. Another $100,000 fund will be administered through the Office of Religious Life to support programming specifically through the University’s cultural centers.The Office of the Provost will also start soliciting proposals to issue evidence-based approaches toward understanding racial bias and improving relations on campus.Quick said creating a faculty committee that will work with students and faculty to create residential diversity programs that will impact the residential college experience is another goal.Improving mechanisms that will record when unfortunate incidents do occur, so that they can be investigated and acted upon as soon as possible. A reporting button has been added to the USC LiveSafe app so that students can immediately report incidents of discrimination.Finally, Quick wrote that the leadership team at USC understands that though improving diversity is not just about the resources they can implement, taking these steps is helping USC move toward becoming a better, more inclusive school. Quick asked students to understand that the greatest form of diversity is that that comes with opinion.“We must be prepared not only to support those with whom we agree, but also respect those with whom we disagree,” he wrote. “Only in that way will we live up to the promise reflected in the faces staring out at us from those iconic photographs and create a University of Southern California worthy of them, and us.”Correction: This article previously stated that the Undergraduate Student Government’s resolution on campus climate was passed on Wednesday. It was passed on Tuesday. The Daily Trojan regrets the error.last_img read more

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