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Warriors’ Kevon Looney on his potential longevity, free agency and more

first_imgOAKLAND – The man seemingly never stops working. At some point, though, Warriors forward Kevon Looney had a rare free moment in practice when he wasn’t studying film, lifting weights, improving his jump shot or completing conditioning drills.Then, Warriors coach Steve Kerr shared with Looney earlier this week his prediction on how his NBA career will unfold.“Your career may not end up being glamorous,” Kerr told Looney. “But it’s going to be really productive and long.”The reason? Looney …last_img read more

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Read to Rise gets kids hooked on books

first_imgBy offering these children a chance to own books, they hope that the sense of ownership will strengthen their interest in reading. (image: Read to Rise)In a bid to address some of the harsh realities of growing up in underprivileged areas, Read to Rise offers South African youth a chance to discover new worlds through reading.As one of the country’s core focuses, education is extremely important with regards to moulding the leaders of the future and arming them with the skills and knowledge necessary for them to lead productive lives and become contributing members of society.The Read to Rise non-government organisation (NGO) was established in 2013 by couple Athol Williams and Taryn Lock, who between them boast seven academic degrees and vast business experience.Born from their shared passion for literacy, education and helping others reach the heights of their potential, the Read to Rise organisation has been working with youth from under-resourced communities such as Mitchell Plain and its surrounding areas near Cape Town.“Athol grew up in Mitchells Plain so he knows the challenges that these young children face,” says Lock.With a large number of schools lacking properly stocked libraries – some lacking libraries all-together – the Read to Rise organisation offers children suitable reading material fitting for their age groups in an attempt to instil a love of reading early on in life.“Read to Rise aims to inspire children to read in under-resourced communities. As the name indicates, we firmly believe that children need to read in order to rise in their personal development and contribution to society,” says Lock. “We believe that children who love to read will excel at school and go on to become constructive citizens. It all starts with reading.”AN EARLY STARTAccording to Read to Rise, children in their foundational phase of education should be reading around 40 books a year that are suited to their level. Their findings suggest that children in the areas they operate read one or two books, which fall far short of the recommendation.This is due to the lack of motivation to pick up a book and read. To address this, Read to Rise visits to hold interactive reading sessions with the children.The organisation has taken a different angle when it comes to encouraging a good reading ethos amongst school children. By offering these children a chance to own books, they hope that the sense of ownership will strengthen their interest in reading.Lock says that they “believe that book ownership is important so give children their own new book to take home.“In addition, we place a Mini-Library – which is a brightly painted bookshelf which contains 50 new age-appropriate story books – in every classroom so that learners have access to these books.”Since its establishment, Read to Rise has visited children in more than 350 classrooms, handing out in excess of 2 800 books to pupils in Soweto and Mitchells Plain.Read to Rise has been working with youth from under-resourced communities such as Mitchell Plain and its surrounding areas near Cape Town.BOOKS IN THE NEW AGESpeaking on the role that books have in the age of tablets and smart phones, Lock says “books play a huge part in today’s age especially in the under-resourced, crime-ridden communities that we work with.“There is something special about holding a new book in your hands, turning the pages and reading it. Book ownership is important as it creates a sense of pride, responsibility and an enjoyment of reading. That’s exactly why we give a brand new, high quality book to every child.”PLAY YOUR PARTIf you’re looking to help the Read to Rise organisation you can visit their website at www.readtorise.co.za or email them at info@readtorise.co.za.“Individuals can volunteer their time to read to children at schools, cover books in plastic at one of our “Cover & Coffee” sessions or offer their expertise to assist with our operations.” Lock explains.“Individuals or corporates can sponsor new books. It costs R45 to sponsor a new book for a learner or R3,200 to sponsor a Mini-Library for a class.”last_img read more

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Resource Discovery| Operation Reach Out: A Free Military Suicide Prevention Mobile App

first_imgBy: Caitlyn BrownPixabay[iPhone by fancycrave1, April 21, 2015] CCOThe use of apps has become fluent and an ingrained part of our technology use. Children know how to access and use apps before they understand how to use a television remote. We use apps to make lists, stay connected, check the weather predictions, navigate and avoid traffic, and to stay entertained. Apps are an integral part of our daily living now, allowing us to outsource information that generations before smartphones had to keep in their memory banks.Our dependence on technology (namely our phones and social media) has led to criticism regarding our ability to have fulfilling interpersonal relationships. On the flip side, technology has improved our ability to stay connected to those who are physically distanced from us for various reasons including deployment and TDY. The invention and use of apps, smartphones, and video calling has aided in families’ ability to remain in contact with their loved ones who are not within physical proximity to one another.  The invention of the aforementioned has also added another element that can be of great benefit: support.Operation Reach Out was created by Military Community Awareness, Inc. (MCA). It is a smartphone app that aims to prevent suicide in military personnel, veterans, and service members. In addition to assisting those who are at-risk for suicide directly, it is also designed to assist those who are concerned about others who may be at risk.When service members return from deployment, some may reintegrate back into their lives with no issues or concerns.  Others, especially those suffering from  PTSD or other mental health concerns, may feel isolated or detached from their support systems for one reason or another upon their return. The app was created to mitigate these feelings of isolation and detachment by creating a support service to those who may feel they have no options.Operation Reach Out provides support, education, resources and help to its users. Regardless of the user, the app provides resources and online links to websites such as the Suicide Prevention Lifeline, Defense Suicide Prevention Office, MilitaryFamily.com and Military Community Awareness to name a few.The app encourages those who are at risk to provide the contact information of those closest to them in case they need to be contacted. It also provides a list of activities that encourage an individual to reconnect with those they feel closest to even though they may have isolated themselves from that person. These activities and suggestions can be rated so the app can be more intuitive to the user’s interests and needs.Additionally, this app provides over ten videos that provide empathetic and compassionate reminders to those who may be in crisis. The goal of the videos is to help the individual understand that the feelings they may be experiencing in the moment will pass and that all problems are solvable if given the time. If you are using the app for your concern about someone else, Operation Reach Out provides nine videos to help navigate questions to ask and how to phrase things when communicating with the individual at risk.Links for the app:For Android Users: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=suicide.prevention.app&hl=enFor iPhone Users:  http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/operation-reach-out/id478899653This post was written by  Caitlyn Brown of the  MFLN Family Development Team. The Family Development team aims to support the development of professionals working with military families.  Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network Family Development team on our website, Facebook, and Twitter.last_img read more

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Many Regrets

first_imgI regret not starting sooner. It wasn’t fear that prevented me from starting. It was the fact that I was comfortable.I regret not treating people with the respect that they deserved. Especially when I was younger, I didn’t treat people as well as I should have.I regret not giving people my full, undivided attention. There is no greater gift you can give a human being than the gift of your full attention. Giving another person your full attention is more difficult now than ever.I regret wasting time. I spent time doing things that did not create value for other people and distracted me from my real mission and wasted my time.I regret believing that someone else was the problem. Stephen Covey said that the belief that someone else is your problem is your real problem. You are your real problem. I can’t count the times I thought another person was my problem.I regret not recognizing my potential earlier in my life. As a young person, I had no idea of my potential. Had I recognized it earlier, I would’ve capitalized on it sooner.I regret almost every minute I’m away from my family and my loved ones. It doesn’t matter what I’m doing; I’d still rather be with my people.I regret not pursuing absolute freedom much sooner. I regret not recognizing that the big game is freedom, not comfort. It’s wealth, not income.I regret not recognizing that we are all connected, that we are not separate sooner. I used to believe that there was a “us” and a “them.” There isn’t. There’s just us.You are supposed to say that you have no regrets, that all the decisions, missteps, mistakes, and failures led you to this point. There is some truth to that. But your regrets are a record of what you have learned and how you have changed.Even if you could go back in time and make decisions to avoid the regrets you have now, that path would only have left you with a different set of regrets. And you still would have had to learn and have had to change to become who you are. Get the Free eBook! Want to master cold calling? Download my free eBook! Many would have you believe that cold calling is dead, but the successful have no fear of the phone; they use it to outproduce their competitors. Download Nowlast_img read more

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GALLERY: 5-peat! San Miguel bags another PBA Philippine Cup crown

first_imgCayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES Duterte wants probe of SEA Games mess PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss READ: San Miguel makes history with 5th straight Philippine Cup title, outlasts Magnolia in Game 7Relive San Miguel’s celebration of its latest title through these photos:FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netJune Mar Fajardo wins another finals MVP award. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.net Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew ‘Rebel attack’ no cause for concern-PNP, AFP Two-day strike in Bicol fails to cripple transport Warriors look to build off strong, well-balanced Game 1 Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venue Catholic schools seek legislated pay hike, too Struggling mightily and pushed to their limit by a gutsy Magnolia side, the San Miguel Beermen still found a way to win and extend their reign in the PBA Philippine Cup for a historic fifth straight year.It was an emotional night for the Beermen, who went through the wringer against the Hotshots with the championship decided in the final minute of Game 7.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ View commentslast_img read more

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10 months agoWatford midfielder Doucoure rules out Marseille move

first_imgWatford midfielder Doucoure rules out Marseille moveby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveWatford midfielder Abdoulaye Doucoure has ruled out a move to Olympique Marseille.Doucoure has talked up a January move to PSG in the last 24 hours.But asked about Marseille, Doucoure told RMC: “No OM no, it does not interest me at all. “Marseille already contacted me at the time with my agent, there were some tracks, it did not really interest me at the time, because I really wanted to move to England. “Marseille, it’s still a big French club, but as I said, my heart club is PSG and then that’s it.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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ESPN Releases Preseason ‘Football Power Index’ Ratings

first_imgESPN's Football Power Index. Twitter/@bobarcher1Twitter/@bobarcher1We’re still over six months away from the start of the 2015 college football season, but it’s never too early to start debating which teams have the best shot at reaching the second College Football Playoff. While most fans believe that Ohio State has a great shot at repeating as national champion, there will be plenty of challengers. ESPN has already put together its Preseason FPI Ratings – which is basically an estimate of team strength (more on that here). Not surprisingly, the Buckeyes check in at No. 1, with Alabama sitting at No. 2. It may shock some fans to see LSU at No. 3 and Baylor at No. 4, however. Here are the top 25 schools, per ESPN. You can see the entire list here – all 128 teams are ranked.1. Ohio State 2. Alabama 3. LSU 4. Baylor 5. Oregon 6. TCU 7. Notre Dame 8. Ole Miss 9. Georgia 10. Arkansas 11. Texas A&M 12. UCLA 13. USC 14. Tennessee 15. Oklahoma 16. Michigan State 17. Stanford 18. Auburn 19. Clemson 20. Arizona State 21. Florida State 22. Mississippi State 23. Georgia Tech 24. Missouri 25. Virginia TechSome other surprises? Notre Dame, despite a quarterback controversy, sits at No. 7. Arkansas and Texas A&M – two teams that did not finish with winning records in the SEC West – come in at No. 10 and No. 11. And in total, there are 10 SEC teams in the top 25.last_img read more

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Female First Nations leader says Winnipeg store treated her life a thief

first_imgMatt Thordarson APTN National NewsAn Indigenous leader is claiming she was discriminated against while shopping at a pharmacy in Winnipeg.Sheila North Wilson is grand chief of Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak in Manitoba.She’s speaking out now because she wants her story to bring awareness.last_img

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Gustafsen Lake warrior granted political asylum in US wants return home to

first_img(A screen grab of the truck James “OJ” Pitawanakwat was driving on Sept. 11, 1995, moments before it hit an RCMP IED during the Gustafsen Lake standoff. YouTube)Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsA Wikwemikong man who was given political asylum in the U.S. following the 1995 Gustafsen Lake armed standoff in British Columbia wants to return to Canada.James “OJ” Pitawanakwat, 44, has lived in the U.S. since August 1998 when he crossed the border while on day parole in Canada.The U.S. Federal Court for the District of Oregon denied Canada’s extradition request for Pitawanakwat in November 2000 on grounds his actions in B.C. were “of a political character” and qualified for an exemption under the extradition treaty between Canada and the U.S.“I would like to go back home to live and come and go throughout Canada and come and go throughout the U.S. without this harassment,” said Pitawanakwat, who is originally from Wikwemikong on Manitoulin Island in Ontario.He said there is still an active warrant out for his arrest in Canada.Pitawanakwat was convicted by a B.C. court in 1997 of mischief and possession of a weapon for a purpose dangerous to the public peace in connection to his involvement in the summer standoff which saw more gunfire exchanged between warriors and police than during the 1990 Oka Crisis.He was sentenced to three years in prison, but was released on day parole after one year. Nine days into his day parole, Pitawanakwat, who was in Surrey, B.C., at the time, said he “just walked right across” the U.S. border. As a First Nation man, Pitawanakwat can legally live on both sides of the border.“I eventually started going across American and showing people the video of the truck explosion,” said Pitawanakwat.(John “Splitting the Sky” Hill describes explosion triggered by RCMP IED. YouTube)The video of the truck explosion is one of the most striking images of the Gustafsen Lake standoff.  It was Sept. 11, 1995, and Pitawanakwat was driving with a woman activist, an AK-47 along with a rifle inside the pick-up truck, his dog Idaho in the back. They were roaring down a logging road when they hit an RCMP installed improvised explosive device (IED). The truck flipped in a plume of dirt and smoke, Pitawanakwat and the woman managed to escape the vehicle, but Idaho was shot by an RCMP sniper.“I remember driving down the road and then an explosion just rocked my world and disorientated me for a quick minute and my combat senses kicked-in and survival set in,” he said. “I relive that moment every day of my life.”Pitawanakwat said he and the activist managed to cross the lake where a cache of weapons was hidden. Some of the other warriors also arrived and began to open fire on the RCMP’s Bison armoured personnel carrier, borrowed from the Canadian Forces.“When I reached the treeline I armed myself and returned to the guts of the conflict on the battle field. The armoured personnel carrier was disabled by small arms fire and by the trees. It knocked out the steering column,” he said. “We just put suppression fire on the other Bison when it started roaring out of nowhere and was shooting people. It was straight out war.”James “OJ” Pitawanakwat during the Gustafsen Lake standoff in 1995. YouTubeThe Gustafsen Lake standoff centred on land leased by the province to a rancher near 100 Mile House, B.C., that was used for Sundance ceremonies. The land, which was never surrendered, was reclaimed by the Ts’Peten Defenders in 1995 who refused to leave despite attempts by the rancher to evict them.The RCMP intervened, and, with support from the Canadian Forces, faced down the Ts’Peten Defenders, who numbered between 30 to 40 people, according to the U.S. Federal Court record.Things escalated in mid-August when Defenders spokesperson William “Wolverine” Jones Ignace said if the RCMP moved into the camp it would be “clearly war…We’re not going to go peaceful. Body bags or do a hell of a long stretch…Nobody is going to tell you to put your weapons down,” according to the court record.The RCMP and the Canadian Forces, working through Operation Wallaby, set up a base camp called Camp Zulu which included armoured personnel carriers, helicopters, a field hospital, communication centre, military assault weapons and a tactical unit of about 400 “heavily armed militarized police,” according to U.S. court records.After several incidents, which saw tens of thousands of rounds exchanged between both sides, the Defenders’ camp surrendered by Sept. 17, 1995.There were 18 people, 13 men and five women, at the camp by the stand-off’s end. All 18 were convicted by a jury following a 10-month trial, according to the U.S. court record.Despite Canada issuing a warrant for his arrest shortly after he fled across the U.S. border, Pitawanakwat managed to evade capture for a little less than two years.He was finally arrested in Lincoln City, Ore., in June 2000, after he went out to buy pizza on his bicycle.“I found out U.S. Marshals were on my tail. One morning they swooped in and got me,” he said. “They converged on me, on my bike and I fled into the thorns. They arrested me and took me to Portland, Ore.”James “OJ” Pitawanakwat, 44, in Mount Pleasant Michigan. He wants to come home to Canada. Photo courtesy of family.U.S. Federal Court Judge Janice Stewart, however, denied Canada’s request for extradition, ruling that Pitawanakwat’s activities at Gustafsen Lake qualified for exemption under the extradition treaty for activity of “a political character.”“The Lake Gustafsen incident involved Indigenous people rising up in their own land against the government of that land. Although the crimes were committed while trespassing and occupying private property, the type of property occupied makes this case unique,” said Stewart, in her ruling. “(The rancher) acquired title to the land through the Canadian government, but this land included tribal land over which Native people believed they had a valid legal claim. Thus, the protest by the Ts’Peten Defenders was directed largely against the Canadian government which had granted (the title)…In addition, the violence was aimed…at the Canadian government and its military forces.”Pitawanakwat was preparing to find a lawyer to help build his case for a final return to Canada earlier this year, but tragedy struck his life in Mount Pleasant, Mich., when his step-son attacked both his mother and Pitawanakwat with a knife.Juan Romero, 22, is accused of stabbing his mother in the face. Pitawanakwat said he was stabbed seven times. Local reports say he was flown to hospital with multiple stab wounds.Romero is currently undergoing a psychiatric assessment and his case is on hold, according to an Isabella County court official. Romero is facing two counts of assault with intent to murder, among other charges.Pitawanakwat was also hit with a sexual assault related charge shortly after the incident, but the case was dismissed on Sept. 10, 2015, according to a court official.“The prosecuting attorney was not ready to proceed with the case,” said the court official.The prosecutor Robert Holmes did not return a call seeking comment.Pitawanakwat’s desire to return to Canada is getting support from one of the most prominent members of the Gustafson Lake standoff, Secwepemc Elder “Wolverine” Ignace.Wolverine recently wrote Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould a letter requesting they call a public inquiry into the events of the 1995 standoff.“Such an inquiry would expose the Canadian government’s genocidal relationship with Indigenous peoples,” said Wolverine, in an emailed response to questions from APTN. “Specifically, the cover-up of the genocidal actions of the federal provincial government during the Ts’Peten-Gustafsen standoff of 1995.”Wolverine said he hoped an inquiry would help allow Pitawanakwat to return home.“James has been in exile for 20 years,” he said. “As an Indigenous man, he has the right to come home. He is an adopted member of (Wolverine’s family), of the Secwepemc Nation as a whole.”Wolverine has also called for a gathering of “Allied” Tribes to meet on Sunday in Secwepemc territory to discuss the recent call for a national inquiry into the 1995 standoff and Pitawanakwat’s return.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

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Chinas GAC to scrap Trumpsounding brand for US market

first_imgDETROIT – Chinese automaker GAC Motor will scrap the brand name it uses in China when it enters the U.S. market next year because it could be confused with President Donald Trump’s surname.For the past eight years, GAC has sold cars and SUVs under the brand Trumpchi in its home market, but is now researching new names before the company’s expected U.S. debut in the fourth quarter of 2019.“We want to provide the best service for American customers, so we want to not be closely linked with politics,” Wang Qiujing, president of GAC Engineering Institute China, said through an interpreter in an interview at the Detroit auto show. “This is the reason we want to rename the brand.”GAC picked the Chinese name Trumpchi in 2010, well before Trump was elected. The similarity to Trump is just a coincidence, Wang added. GAC will continue to use Trumpchi in China, where the word means legend and good fortune.GAC’s first vehicle in the U.S. will be the GS8, a loaded-out full-size SUV that will cost about $35,000. Two more vehicles are being researched for U.S. sales, but have not been selected yet.The company showed seven different of its models on a video and unveiled two more at the Detroit show. One is a gull-wing compact electric SUV called the Enverge, which is still in the concept phase. The automaker says it will go over 370 miles on a single charge. Also unveiled was the GA4 midsize sedan that will go on sale in China later this month.The GS8 would be comparable to a big luxury SUV, many of which go for more than $60,000. Wang said he didn’t know what the brand’s lowest-price vehicle would be in the U.S.GAC sold just over 500,000 automobiles in China last year, up 37 per cent from 2016.The company says it is negotiating with partner Fiat Chrysler about possible distribution of vehicles. Wang said GAC is the top-ranked domestic brand for initial quality in China in J.D.Power and Associates surveys, and it ranks fourth or fifth when joint ventures with foreign automakers are included. He says the company’s vehicle quality will be ready for U.S. buyers, and it will work with U.S. partners to meet stricter U.S. safety standards.Chinese automakers are advanced and have expertise in mass production but the American market may not be ready yet to accept GAC, said Jake Fisher, Consumer Reports’ director of auto testing.Other Chinese companies showed vehicles at the CES gadget show in Las Vegas last week such as Byton, which unveiled an electric prototype that’s like a Tesla Model X SUV but costs thousands less, Fisher said.“There will be Chinese automakers at the top of the market and at the bottom of the market, and it will be very interesting to see how they are received,” he said.GAC already has a research centre in Silicon Valley and is working on another one in Detroit, as well as a Los Angeles design centre. Initially it will import vehicles from China but depending on sales, plans to build a factory in the U.S.GAC, which stands for Guangzhou Automobile Group Co., also plans to enter other global markets after the U.S., including Europe.____Auto Writer Dee-Ann Durbin contributed to this report.last_img read more

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