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5 Seconds Of Summer Wows Sold-Out Jones Beach Theater

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Australian pop-punk sensation 5 Seconds of Summer rocked Nikon at Jones Beach Theater on Tuesday, the first of back-to-back, sold-out concerts at the seaside amphitheater before taking the stage again Wednesday night.After Los Angelas-based rockers Hey Violent got the show started, 5SOS played hits such as “She’s Kinda Hot,” the new single off their second album, Sounds Good Feels Good, which is set to drop next month, and a few covers, including Green Day’s “American Idiot.” The crowd was jumping as soon as they opened with their party anthem, “End Up Here” off their self-titled debut released last year. The band’s line-up includes Luke Hemmings on guitar and vocals, guitarist Michael Clifford, bassist Calum Hood and drummer Ashton Irwin.“I’d like to thank my mom for giving birth to me, I’d like to thank Michael’s mom for giving birth to Michael, I’d like to thank Calum Hood for giving birth to Luke Hemmings,” the band, who are mostly teenagers, joked between songs in a nod to their mothers, who were at the concert laughing and cheering on their sons.The group’s Jones Beach concerts marked the first time the band has headlined a major venue in the New York Metro area, The Village Voice noted. The concerts came shortly after the group performed at the Teen Choice Awards, where they were nominated for multiple awards, including music group male artists and music group of the summer, but continuously lost to One Direction.The Jones Beach show didn’t all go as planned. When they played “Rejects,” toward the end of the song, Hemmings had the stage crew turn off all of the lights in the theater. As he urged the crowd to dance as the band started performing again, at one point, they sounded like amateurs, as feedback from their microphones lasted for at least 10 seconds.But the boys recovered and the show went on. While performing the heartbreaking song “Amnesia,” the crowd was singing along in unison as they had through much of the performance. At another point, the crowd put their hands in the air and clapped along to the rhythm.The multi-color lights were flickering everywhere as they worked their way up to “She Looks So Perfect,” their breakout hit that reached No. 1 on the charts in multiple countries. For their encore, 5SOS saved the best for last: “Good Girl” and “What I Like About You,” a cover of a song by The Romantics.The band’s Rock Out with Your Socks Out Tour, which started in Portugal in May, is on its last leg with just eight more stops before concluding in West Palm Beach, Fla. on Sept. 13. After that, they plan to work on new music.5 Seconds of Summer plays Nikon at Jones Beach Theater on Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2015 (Photo by Kevin Kane/Long Island Press).last_img read more

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Wilder exposes Anthony Joshua

first_imgRelatedPosts Anthony Joshua wants Tyson Fury, Wilder fight Joshua: Tyson Fury won’t distract me Tyson Fury challenges WWE champion Deontay Wilder believes his “sixth sense” tells him the “secret” reason Anthony Joshua lost to Andy Ruiz Jr – and why the rematch will go the same way.Shockwaves were sent through the heavyweight division when Joshua was beaten by Ruiz Jr but he can regain the IBF, WBA and WBO titles when they meet again on December 7, live on Sky Sports Box Office.“I really don’t believe he is ready for that. I’m one of the people that he has to prove wrong,” WBC champion Wilder exclusively told Sky Sports about Joshua.“Many people have doubted me from the beginning and still do so. But I’m one of the people he has to prove wrong.“I understand body language, I am very smart when it comes to [these things]. What his body said in that ring showed me everything that I need to see. Only the fighter would know within himself.“The secret is still to be told. And that’s OK, because you want to keep people guessing. Was it this? Or was it that? That’s why the second fight is bigger. People don’t know what to think.“People will finally see what it really was.“If he’s not right, and people are saying one thing but he does another, then people will have their own perception of what they think about him afterwards.“People say ‘if he loses, it’s over’.“There is more pressure on him. When I talk about his situation I feel drained.“Trust me, I have a sixth sense.”An undisputed heavyweight championship fight could be resurrected if Joshua beats Ruiz Jr, and Wilder remains unbeaten in a rematch with Luis Ortiz on November 23.Wilder and Tyson Fury also plan a second fight for 2020, after they battled to a draw last year.Joshua’s promoter Eddie Hearn told Sky Sports this week: “I don’t see how the February fight [Wilder vs Fury] can happen.“The whole world is looking at Joshua-Ruiz Jr, and I don’t think anything will happen until that fight takes place. Ruiz Jr is with the [promoters] PBC and Al Haymon, and so is Deontay Wilder.“If Ruiz beats Joshua, they’ll be looking to make an undisputed fight [against Wilder], but obviously if Joshua wins, that throws everything out. Who can rule out Joshua against Tyson Fury at Wembley next summer?”Tags: Deontay Wilderlast_img read more

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Good chance to see fresh faces, says England opener Jason Roy

first_imgSOUTHAMPTON: England opener Jason Roy has said the Ireland ODI series will give the team an opportunity to check out new faces in the ranks with an eye on the T20 World Cup, which has now been postponed to next year due to the COVID-19 pandemic.It will be a young England side led by Eoin Morgan which will take on Ireland with many first team stars like Ben Stokes, Joe Root and Jofra Archer rested after the West Indies Test series. Speaking to Rob Key on the latest edition of the Sky Sports Cricket podcast, the Surrey batsman said: “We’ve obviously got the T20 World Cup to work towards [in 2021] and then we want to go on and win the following World Cup. “This Ireland series is giving us an opportunity to see a lot of young players — Tom Banton, Saqib Mahmood and other players coming through and ones who haven’t got a chance in the past. “It’s another opportunity to see the raw talent coming through. The talent in the squad that we got together for the training camp before the cut for this ODI series was scary,” said Roy, an ODI World Cup winner with England on home soil in 2019. “It was just so good to watch; that would have been a stinking job for the selectors to select out of that. It must have been so difficult. “The process is the same again as it was for the last four years — build those foundations and then find what works.” Roy said the T20 World Cup is at the forefront of England’s plans going ahead. “The T20 World Cup is probably at the forefront of our minds. But I think we do quite well as a squad to separate all of the three-forms. But for the time being we just want to win this series now.” (IANS) Also watch: #NewsMakers: Amending EIA Notification, 2020 Impact on NorthEastlast_img read more

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The fine art of pricing a penalty shootout

first_img As the nation prepares for England’s first World Cup semi-final since Italia 90, England fans frantically hope that the anxiety of the Colombia game isn’t replicated and Southgate’s side win in 90 minutes.However, should England’s fate see them head to spot kicks tonight, we take a look at the challenges that are presented to a trader as they look to price the dreaded penalty shootout. SBC spoke to Head of Compilation at Abelson Info, Jeevan Jeyaratnam who revealed his belief that a shootout is far from a lottery, as well as looking at some of the key factors in pricing penalties. SBC: In general, how difficult is it to price which side will win a penalty shootout? Jeevan Jeyaratnam: A common misconception is that a penalty shootout is a “lottery” with both sides having an equal chance. This is not far from the truth, however, if we breakdown the mechanics it is more nuanced than that.There are a couple of approaches to pricing a penalty shootout, the first, a more accurate but laborious process, involves using player parameters to determine the likely more experienced, and therefore successful penalty takers in each team- a “penalty prowess” player/team parameter. Generally, the team with better players are going to be favourites for the match, this team would also be slightly more likely to win a penalty shootout. Therefore, pre-game shootout odds should reflect that superiority, albeit if the game has gone all the way to penalties there is far less variance between the two teams’ chances. Most firms won’t be going to the detail of analysing each player’s parameters. So, method two, derived from the match supremacy, allows us to use the 50-50 idea as a benchmark, before adding a small deviation to allow for the superiority of one side over another. If we look at bet365’s prices, at 90mins, prior to the England v Colombia shootout, we can see England were regarded as slight favourite to win a shootout (3.10 v 3.25). At the end of the extra-time period the prices had snapped to 1.90 v 1.90, but a closer look at the Asian Handicap prices shows England at 1.875 (53.33%) v 1.975 (50.63%) for Colombia. This is as we would expect to see given that England were judged to have the superior team at kick-off. It is small but significant difference. The reason for the variation in pricing what is essentially the same market is likely due to margin and odds ladders, and possibly different supplier feeds. The Asian prices were bet to 103.96% while the top of the page “To Win Shootout” prices were bet to 105.2%. Always shop around!SBC: In the Croatia versus Denmark game, we saw Modric miss a penalty in the game before stepping up to take one in the shootout, can in-play penalties have an impact on pricing for a shootout? JJ: Invariably the team’s regular penalty taker is an experienced and competent individual, able to handle the pressure situation that comes with a penalty. Bearing this in mind, we wouldn’t expect to see this affect a player taking another penalty in the shootout. Of course, if we were updating individual player parameters in real-time, there would be an additional data point for both taker and keeper, but honestly these would have little impact on the pricing.SBC: Additionally, in that shootout we saw dominant performances from Schmeichel and Subasic, how much can a strong keeper sway a sides’ odds before heading into a shootout? JJ: Of course, a better than average goalkeeper is a benefit, and if we were allocating player/team “penalty prowess” parameters, this would be reflected. It is fair to say that most firms/supplier feeds will set up their penalty shootout prices as such;As a starting point we know that 75% (1.33) of penalties are scored and 25% missed (4.00). That sample is going to be mainly comprised of experienced penalty takers. So, to score the 1st pen, 1.30 (76%), to miss, 3.40 (29.41%) is a likely offer. The same prices would probably be used for the 2nd pen. After that we’d likely see some degradation in the quality of the taker, the offer might look like this; to score 1.33 (75%), to miss, 3.25 (30.76%). The “to score” price would continue to fractionally slide the further the shootout went. SBC: For the Russia Spain game it was clear for long periods, Russia were playing for penalties, can the moral victory of getting to penalties increase a smaller teams’ odds of winning a shootout? JJ: Psychologically I’m not sure of the impact of this, it isn’t something we’d worry too much about from a compilation perspective. I’d actually argue the opposite, in that the smaller teams may feel they have already achieved their goal before embarking on the arduous task of winning a shootout.SBC: Can the body language of players have any impact at all on the odds for a penalty shootout?JJ: We all recall times when we’ve said, “he doesn’t fancy this, I think he looks like missing”, and when that hunch is confirmed, we remember it. What we don’t recall with such clarity is the times that the player goes on to prove us wrong and score. This is evidence of confirmation bias and really has no bearing on price. If a player has agreed to step up for a penalty then there’s every chance he feels confident enough to convert it. There is, of course, extra pressure on penalties that must be scored in order to avoid defeat, likewise, those whose success can mean victory. At a very detailed level this could affect pricing but realistically, with margins, it isn’t something firms should be worrying about at this time. Submit StumbleUpon Playtech goes live in the US with bet365 August 7, 2020 Oddschecker: ‘Unusual circumstances’ fail to hinder Royal Ascot traffic July 23, 2020 Related Articles Altenar: Supporting expansion plans in Denmark and Portugal August 20, 2020 Share Sharelast_img read more

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