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At the Bar’s Annual MeetingJustices discuss their role in the presidential election

first_imgJustice Harry Lee Anstead noted the positive effect Florida’s openness and cameras in the courtroom have had on other states: “I’ve had calls from 10 to 12 members of high courts.. . . One example is New York. They’ve taken up this issue of camera in the courts almost every year with their state bar. And every year, they’ve turned it down. This year, for the first time, they are going to have an experimental program in New York to have cameras in the courtroom.” “It’s important to remember that all courts are reactionary institutions,” Anstead said. “Once those cases come to the institution, we have to grapple in a workmanlike manner. Really, that’s what happened at the court. Other than the visible increase of security, we really were cocooned there in the court.. . . In a sense, all of those crisis-mode operations (when death warrants are issued) served us well in terms of conceptualizing how to address serious cases issued that had to be turned around in a relatively short period of time.” Justice Anstead At the Bar’s Annual Meeting Justices discuss their role in the presidential election Associate Editor Stuck in Homestead during the natural disaster of Hurricane Andrew. Presiding over an intense trial. Going into crisis mode, like when the governor signs a death warrant. A Kodak moment you couldn’t get wrong because so much was at stake and the whole world was watching. Justice Wells Chief Justice Charles Wells answered: “I wasn’t in Homestead for Hurricane Andrew, but I think it was a lot of the same feeling. My reaction was it was certainly a unique privilege to have an opportunity to be part of that type of event, which was certainly historical. It was much like being in a very intense trial, because you really know that storm was out there swirling. And that you were going to have to be prepared on a very short-term basis.” Justice Leander Shaw agreed: “The U.S. Supreme Court was not too impressed by our rulings, but I think they did take a leaf from our book in getting opinions out on the same day for the first time.” Justice Fred Lewis added: “The communications we received from judicial officers of other states was consistent in saying: ‘We care not what the result is, but we thank you for being open, and you’ve added a new dimension to our understanding of court operations. The second aspect was the openness. One of the letters that touched me was from a person with a military background. It started out something along the lines of: ‘I began questioning what my country was about, until I saw the court. And your court looks like my country.’ July 15, 2001 Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Regular News “And everybody in America knows about the Florida Supreme Court and credits the Florida Supreme Court as being a court that will work under conditions that are unimaginable in the appellate arena, decide tough cases expeditiously, and do it in a way that America understands.”Raoul Cantero of Miami was the first audience member to step to the microphone with a question: “It became apparent to me during the election cases that there was a surprise to the public outside of Florida how open the court was, especially how it had already allowed cameras in the courtroom. It was easy to get videos of oral arguments. What kind of influence has that kind of openness in your court had across the country? Do you see other supreme courts developing that system to allow cameras in the courtroom?”Justice Barbara Pariente got a laugh when she said: “As far as us being on camera, I thought Justice Wells had the greatest observation: Really, we had started televising our proceedings back when Justice (Gerald) Kogan was chief justice, and we had been televised regularly on the educational channels. We needed something to increase our ratings.” Wells called the televised court proceedings “a great civics lesson for all of us and the whole country. I think some people may have learned something about the appellate process by watching on television. Although, I noted there was a letter to the editor that I read that said, ‘Obviously, those justices on the Florida Supreme Court didn’t know what they were doing, or else they wouldn’t have had to ask those lawyers all those questions.’”Deleria Hendrix of Tampa asked the justices to comment on the professionalism of the attorneys who appeared before the high court in the elections cases, as well as commenting on professionalism in general, in the context of how many Bar grievances they see compared to the past.“The professionalism of the attorneys who participated in the elections cases was above reproach,” Lewis said. “You had some of the finest lawyers, and they behaved admirably. I certainly hope that the American public perceived in the manner that we did that these were fine, fine lawyers and the legal system at its best.”Regarding the overall behavior of lawyers, Lewis admitted: “There are times you are a little saddened by what you see occurring before and during oral arguments. Your final issue is that we see more than we should of cases dealing with lawyers who have gone astray. And there are a great many of those matters that are handled really before we get involved. I think it’s wrong to think professionalism is at the back end. Professionalism is at the front end. That’s where it’s going to be resolved before they get into law school and in law school. That’s the time.”Quince said until she came to the court, she really never had a real appreciation for the number of discipline cases.“Sometimes, it’s very troubling to see the number of lawyers who do have to go through the disciplinary process. I am hopeful the more we have professionalism and ethics seminars, it will help to decrease those numbers,” Quince said. At the Bar’s Annual MeetingJustices discuss their role in the presidential election The bonus to having oral arguments broadcast worldwide during the unprecedented challenges of those deadline pressures, the justices agreed, was that Florida now serves as a model for the nation on the benefits of cameras in the courtroom, and the attitude of openness at the high court with a public information officer and court web site that cater to the public’s right to know. Florida’s Supreme Court justices Those were among the justices’ descriptions of what it felt like to be caught in the whirlwind of the presidential election litigation as a member of the Florida Supreme Court. They shared their observations during the congenial question-and-answer session known as Discussion with the Court at the Bar’s Annual Meeting June 21. Pariente said the feedback the court has gotten from around the country is that Florida “has been a model, as far as openness. Whether people agreed or disagreed with the outcome, the fact that the public at large was able to see us and hear us, I think it certainly indirectly influenced the U.S. Supreme Court, as far as getting their oral arguments out in historic time, within that same day.” Justice Pariente Tony Musto, of Hallendale, asked: “I was just wondering, from a personal perspective what you went through. This is such a unique thing for a state supreme court. What was it like? I’m sure, like any of us, you would have rather the election had been very clean and decided. But was it like: ‘Oh, boy! We’re the ones doing this! or ‘Geez, I wish this was going on in Illinois!’? In the aftermath, what are your feelings? Do you get fan mail from Peoria?” Justice Peggy Quince commended the law clerks and judicial assistants who worked all hours: “The openness of the court is dependent on all the other people who work there. And what has really struck me since I’ve been there is how much everyone who works at the court truly feels a part of it and is really willing to do all that is necessary in order to get the job done.” Justice Quince Justice Lewis “I thought that was a very powerful statement about the composition of the court itself. I was very proud to be part of a system that was open. I think it served a great purpose,” said Lewis, crediting much of the court’s cutting-edge openness to the leadership of Kogan, who watched from the audience. Justice Shaw And Shaw added: “Of course, we were seeing some of the best lawyers in the country on this particular case. I have a son in law school, and he didn’t feel they showed the proper deference to the court. I had to explain to him, ‘Look, those lawyers have 20-some minutes to put their case on, and they didn’t have time to spend 10 minutes of it bowing and scraping to us.’ They had to get in and get the job done, and they did a masterful job in doing it. “Appellate practitioners thought knowing the Florida Supreme Court was one of those highly guarded secrets we wouldn’t even tell our trial lawyer partners about what the justices were like. Now the cat is out of the bag, so to speak,” said Ben Kuehne, chair of the Appellate Practice Section that sponsored the event. Ben Kuehne Shaw added: “Basically, we’re problem-solvers, and this was another problem to solve. I think that was the approach of everybody on the court. The only difference here was this was a Kodak moment, and you couldn’t get it wrong. We did spend a lot more time than we normally would, and we tried a lot harder. We had just an impossible situation because the statutes were in irreconcilable conflict. And we tried our best to reconcile that which could not be reconciled. But you did know the eyes of history were upon you. And we did have that added pressure.”Pariente admitted that the first day of the election brought not dread, but a sense of relief: “That was the day Justice Lewis, Justice Quince and myself had been up for merit retention, so we were just happy to have been retained. I think the Saturday of the Florida State, University of Florida game was a very sad day for me, because I was supposed to go to Cape Cod to spend Thanksgiving with my family.”And Wells, a Gator fan, interjected dryly of that Seminole trouncing, 30 – 7: “It was a very sad day for me.”“For different reasons,” Pariente continued, while the audience chuckled. “Not only was it an intense period, but as we reflected back on our calendar during that period in time, the 36 days, we realized that the first week of post election was an oral argument week, and the first week in December was another oral argument week. The governor had signed two warrants during that period of time, so we had death cases we were also having to attend to. Plus, we were monitoring and getting copies from the pleadings of all the other litigation that was go on.. . . If you think of the normal appellate process and how long it takes to have briefs filed, and then have oral arguments and then a decision. Then imagine that for the first case we had we ordered briefing on a Friday, briefing had to be in over the weekend. We had oral arguments on Monday, and we issued our unanimous opinion on Tuesday. Just imagine that! That was amazing!“People say: ‘Well, how did you feel after the second opinion?’ Obviously, there was disagreement among the court. But we’re used to have disagreements among one another, and we’re used to going on to the next case. Yes, it was a unique situation,” Pariente said. “Maybe this was an unsolvable problem. But as far as legal principles that were underlying the principle, those of us on whatever side we were coming from felt that we had reached principled decisions. And that’s the best you can do.”Anstead drew an analogy to the crisis mode when death warrants are issued. “As far as discipline, I think the Bar does a great job in disciplining lawyers who do go astray. The only problem that occurs, and I don’t know what the solution is, the problem with public perception of whether the Bar circles the wagon or takes complaints seriously,” Shaw said. “Perhaps the PR facet is what we need to pay more attention to.. . . But until it is shown a lawyer has done something wrong, we can’t make things public.”(Justice Major Harding did not participate in this year’s Discussion with the Court, because he was presenting a program for the judiciary in Oklahoma.)last_img read more

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Wilder mocks ‘pillow fists’ of Fury ahead of rematch

first_img “I don’t believe he’ll be able to develop (power), no matter what trainer he brings in,” Wilder said. “You just don’t develop power in a couple of weeks… it’s impossible.” Fury, who is arguably the most skillful defensive boxer in the heavyweight division and outfoxed Wilder for long periods in the first fight, says he plans a more aggressive approach in the rematch. But Wilder is skeptical that the self-styled “Gypsy King” plans to go on the attack, and believes that he has already planted doubt in Fury’s mind after sending him to the canvas with a crushing combination in the 12th round last time. Fury miraculously recovered his senses after that knockdown and somehow managed to hang on for the draw. Wilder, however, believes he has inflicted lasting damage on the Briton. “If he brings the fight to me it’s going to make the fight that much more interesting,” Wilder said. Promoted Content14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right Now10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic Bombs6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A Drone10 Characters Who Deserve To Be Official Disney PrincessesWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?The Models Of Paintings Whom The Artists Were Madly In Love With7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The UniverseBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Made10 Extremely Gorgeous Asian Actresses7 Theories About The Death Of Our Universe7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better Read Also: Tyson Fury denies he’s nervous ahead Wilder rematch “Deep down in his heart, I really feel that he’s nervous from the first time. When you knock a person out and get a concussion, you never forget that. “You never forget who did it to you. And when you’re going back in the ring with that person a second time it has to be stressful. He knows what the truth was. “He can say he beat me by a wide margin but he honestly don’t believe that. If he believed he beat me, he wouldn’t have changed up so much.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… World heavyweight champion Deontay Wilder ridiculed Tyson Fury’s punching power on Tuesday as the two unbeaten fighters prepare for their eagerly anticipated rematch in Las Vegas. Wilder, the reigning WBC champion, climbs back into the ring with British star Fury on February 22, 14 months after the two men battled to a thrilling draw in Los Angeles in December 2018. World champion Deontay Wilder (L) doubts Tyson Fury (R) possesses the punching power to knock him out in their February 22 rematch Fury, who was knocked down twice by Wilder in the first fight, insists he plans to chase a knockout in the rematch, believing he has little chance of winning a decision in front of Las Vegas judges. However, Wilder on Tuesday poured scorn on Fury’s threats of knockout – dismissing his opponent as having “pillows” for fists. Wilder, 42-0 with one drawn and 41 knockouts, cited his experience from the first Fury fight, revealing he had felt no soreness after the 12-round scrap. “I can’t tell you any rounds where I felt like I was threatened by his power,” Wilder said on a conference call. “He has pillows as fists. That’s how soft they were. Maybe my adrenaline was too high to feel anything. Sometimes after a fight you feel sore. But even after the fight I didn’t feel anything. “I took all his punches, the ones he landed, and I walked right through them. So I don’t respect none of his power. “He’s just a tall big man that can move around the ring. And that’s about it. As far as power, there’s none there.” – Power outage – Fury has switched trainers for next week’s rematch, bringing in Javan “Sugarhill” Steward in a move he hopes will boost his knockout power. Wilder, however, is unimpressed by the changes in Fury’s corner.last_img read more

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Bulldogs Win Hosted Quad Meet

first_imgThe Batesville track and field displayed some incredible performances last night to run away with two victories as they hosted a 4-way meet between Hauser, Jac-Cen-Del and North Decatur.  Boys won by almost triple bringing in 119 points!  North Decatur was second with 44, JCD just outscored Hauser 38-37.  For the girls, they won by just over twice as many points with 111.5 to North Decatur’s 52.5.  JCD and Hauser tied as they both had 37 points.  It was a pretty beautiful night with very little wind and it only started to get a little chilly as the sun went down and many athletes took advantage of it.  The Bulldogs took home many blue ribbons and capture many 1st and 2nd place finishes.  Our four blue ribbon winner for the night was Stephanie Nobbe as she had season personal bests in all her individual events.  And again, there were many Bulldogs receiving personal bests for the night as I will list at the bottom.  But first, for the ribbon winners.  The top 5 earned ribbons and points for their team at this meet and for Batesville, they went to the following…1st place winners (which is quite a list) were:Adam Bedel-DiscusKent Meyers-Pole VaultSam Haskamp-100m dash and 200m dashBenjamin Moster-1600m runJJ Kuisel-400m dashTyler Myers-300m hurdlesAdam Moster-800m runGabby Gibbs-high jumpStephanie Nobbe-pole vault, 100m dash and 200m dashLilly Meyer-long jumpLiz Loichinger-1600m runCarley Pride-400m dashKatie Olsen-800m runLily Pinckley-3200m runBoth 4 x 100m relays: Tyler Myers, Justin Heiser, Charlie Laymon, Sam Haskamp and Gabby Gibbs, Lilly Meyer, Roxie Hund and Stephanie NobbeBoth 4 x 400m relays: Adam Moster, Tyler Myers, Johnathon Lynch and JJ Kuisel and Carley Pride, Liz Loichinger, Gabby Gibbs and Katie OlsenBoth 4 x 800m relays: JJ Kuisel, Johnathon Lynch, Benjamin Moster and Adam Moster and Liz Loichinger, Trysta Vierling, Marai Lopez and Katie Olsen2nd place finishes went to:Charlie Laymon-long jumpAdam Bedel-shot putZach Gutzwiller-pole vaultChase Hamilton-110m hurdles and 300m hurdlesJohnathan Lynch-800m runIsaiah Riffle-200m dashDillon Murray-3200m runGabby Gibbs-shot putKatie Bedel-pole vaultRoxie Hund-100m hurdlesLily Pinckley-1600m runKatie Olsen 400m dashTrysta Vierling-3200m runEarning 3 points with the 3rd place finish are:Sam Sittloh-shot putKent Meyers-high jumpJustin Heiser-100m dashNathan Villani-1600m runKavin Saravanan-400m dashAdam Hollowell-3200m runMaria Lopez-800m runLilly Meyer-200m dash4th place were:Gabe Gunter-high jumpFaith Teckulve-discusKatie Bedel-long jumpLilly Meyer-100m dashRoxie Hund-300m hurdlesAnd finishing out the scoring earning 1 point for the team and the 5th place ribbon were:Justin Heiser-long jump and Carley Pride-high jumpTaking advantage of the weather and earning personal bests for the night by event were:100m dash: Isaiah Riffle, Sam Haskamp, Charlie Laymon, Justin Heiser, Jacob Wuestefeld, Manav Patel, Lilly Meyer, Michaela Nobbe and Taylor Townsley200m dash: Isaiah Riffle, Sam Haskamp, Charlie Laymon, Justin Heiser, Ben Schebler, Jacob Wuestefeld, Lilly Meyer andTaylor Townsley110/100 hurldes: Chase Hamilton and Katie Bohman300m hurldes: Roxie Hund800m dash: Johnathon Lynch, Adam Moster, Joshua Myers and Will Nuhring1600m run: Benjamin Moster3200m run: Adam Hollowell, Daren Smith, Trysta VierlingDiscus: Adam Bedel, Sam Haskamp and Carlie SchrankShot Put: Connor Batchelor, Jack Forbeck, Chase Hamilton, Levi Lowery and Will MesserschmidtPole Vault: Kent Meyers, Zach Gutzwiller, Kasin Hughes and Maria LopezLong Jump: Charlie Laymon, Isaiah Riffle, Tyler Myers, Jacob Wuestefeld, Lilly Meyer, Callie Main, and Shalee Harrington4 x 800m split: Dillon Murray, Kavin Saravanan, Alex Livers and Daren Smith4 x 400m split: Joshua Myers, Nathan Villani, Quinn Rasncik, Carley Pride, Ava Ralston and Katie Bohman4 x 800m relay team: of Daren Smith, Nathan Villani, Alex Livers and Dillon Murray4 x 400m relay teams of: Joshua Myers, Elliott Mertz, Nathan Villani and Quinn Rasnick and Maria Lopez, Shalee Harrington, Katie Bohman and Ava RalstonAs you can see their are many names that you see multiple times!  Hard work is definitely paying off! Congratulations to all!The Bulldogs have two more meets this week both at East Central.  The JV will travel to EC tomorrow for the JV Invitational and the Varsity on Friday.  Good luck Dogs!Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Lisa Gausman.last_img read more

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McDowell won’t give up on Masters

first_imgGraeme McDowell insisted he would never consider not playing the Masters despite another frustrating experience at Augusta National. “It is a celebration of golf on my favourite golf course in the world. It is. I love it. But it’s unrequited. “Once I feel like I have got one up on this course it takes two back. I walk away still disappointed a little that I can’t score as well as I feel I should round this course. I threw away shots like confetti all week. ” I think it’s a puzzle you can solve. I realised my style of putting is not suited to Augusta. I’m going to have to work on a type of speed putting that’s going to be suitable. “You have to be a ‘front-edge’ putter like Bubba (Watson), I’ve never seen anyone roll in putts from six feet slower than Bubba. You have to drop them in and I have to adapt to do that round here.” McDowell’s score could have been even worse after he was initially given a one-shot penalty for moving his marker as he attempted to swat a bee away from his ball on the third green. However, European Tour chief referee John Paramor rescinded the penalty a few holes later and McDowell added: ” I said could he follow me the rest of the day because he was the first guy who has saved me a shot in a while.” McDowell carded a final round of 73 on Sunday to finish six over par and is now a combined 24 over for his eight appearances in the year’s first major championship. ” I can’t imagine not coming here,” the former US Open champion said. “It would be sacrilege not to play here no matter how much it frustrates you as you have to enjoy it for what it is. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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