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Mandela: a remarkable 92 years

first_imgNelson Mandela with Siphiwe Tshabalala, the South African football star who scored the very first goal of the 2010 Fifa World Cup. (Image: Nelson Mandela Foundation)President, Nobel Peace Prize laureate and statesman, Nelson Mandela, the world’s icon of reconciliation, compassion and goodwill, turns 92 on Sunday 18 July 2010.The day will be the first international Nelson Mandela Day, as declared by the United Nations in 2009. On the day, people around the world are urged to spend 67 minutes helping others, to celebrate the 67 years Mandela spent fighting apartheid.Today, US secretary of state Hillary Rodham Clinton issued a statement wishing Mandela happy birthday.“I am honoured and humbled to call President Mandela my friend,” she said. “Like millions of his admirers around the world, I am deeply moved by his generosity of spirit and unfailing courage in the face of overwhelming obstacles.“Nelson Mandela is a hero to people of all backgrounds and experience who strive for freedom and progress. His story is filled with an amazing strength and integrity of spirit. There is no one more deserving of this unprecedented international recognition, and I am delighted to offer him my warmest wishes on this special day.”Already, birthday presents are piling up at the Nelson Mandela Foundation’s gift office – many of them vuvuzela trumpets. Times Live reports that many of the presents began to arrive after the end of the 2010 Fifa World Cup, and they include a basket of books from Peru’s ambassador, a woollen hat from NGO Gogo Magic and a wooden boat from the Cameroonian soccer team.On Saturday Mandela will celebrate his birthday with South African President Jacob Zuma and other African National Congress dignitaries, and spend Sunday, his birthday, with his family, including his wife Graca Machel.An enormous legacyNelson Mandela’s 92 years have been remarkable.After spending 27 years in apartheid’s prisons, Mandela became South Africa’s first democratically elected president in 1994. He united a fraught and fearful country, bringing together blacks and whites when South Africa was living through violent and troubled times.His legacy is enormous, and most tangible in the Nelson Mandela Foundation and the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund. The former embodies the spirit of reconciliation, ubuntu and social justice, working through strategic networks and partnerships to capture the vision and values of Mandela’s life; the latter with developing programmes and partnerships to protect and improve the lives of children and youth.Out of the children’s fund grew the 46664 initiative, a worldwide concert fundraising programme to help victims and orphans of Aids.This year, his birthday was commemorated as Mandela Day, celebrated worldwide. It is hoped that the day will become a global fixture, to always remember the sacrifices Mandela made for peace and reconciliation in South Africa.Part of Mandela Day was a campaign to encourage everyone across the world to take 67 minutes in the day to do something for the good of humanity and the planet.“Mr Mandela has spent 67 years making the world a better place. We’re asking you for 67 minutes,” says the Mandela Day website.Troublemaker from the Eastern CapeNelson Rolihlahla Mandela was born on 18 July 1918 in Mvezo in the Eastern Cape province, the son of a chief of the Tembu clan of the Xhosa nation. At the age of seven he was enrolled in the local missionary school, where he was given the name “Nelson”, after the Admiral Horatio Nelson of the Royal Navy, by a Methodist teacher who found his African name difficult to pronounce. That name, Rohlihlahla, means “troublemaker”.After his father was stripped of his chieftainship following a dispute with a local magistrate, Mandela and his mother moved to the small village of Qunu. In 1927, when Mandela was nine, his father died, and the boy became the ward of the Tembu regent, Jongintaba Dalindyebo. He was to be groomed to assume high office but, influenced by the cases that came before the chief’s court, decided to become a lawyer.In 1939, after he had matriculated from school, Mandela enrolled at the University College of Fort Hare for a bachelor of arts degree. But the following year, after being suspended from college for joining in a protest boycott and fleeing an arranged marriage, he moved to South Africa’s principal city, Johannesburg.Arriving in Alexandra township in the north of the city, he found work as a guard at one of Johannesburg’s many gold mines, and later as an articled clerk at a law firm. He completed his degree by correspondence at the University of South Africa, and began to study law at the University of the Witwatersrand.In 1942 Mandela entered politics by joining the African National Congress (ANC), South Africa’s major liberation movement and today the country’s ruling party. It was during this time that he and a small group of mainly young members of the ANC embarked on a mission to transform the party into a mass movement.In 1944 he, Anton Lembede and Mandela’s lifelong friends and comrades Oliver Tambo and Walter Sisulu founded the ANC Youth League (ANCYL). That year he also married his first wife, Evelyn Mase. In 1947 he was elected president of the ANCYL.The year 1948 was a dark one in South Africa, with the election of the racist National Party, voted into government by a white electorate on the platform of apartheid. In response, in 1949, the ANC adopted its Programme of Action, inspired by the Youth League, which advocated the weapons of boycott, strike, civil disobedience and non-cooperation with authority. The programme aimed at the attainment of full citizenship and direct parliamentary representation for all South Africans. In policy documents co-written by Mandela, the ANCYL paid special attention to the redistribution of the land, trade union rights, free and compulsory education for all children, and mass education for adults.During the Campaign for Defiance of Unjust Laws in 1952, Mandela was elected the ANC’s national volunteer-in-chief and travelled the country organising resistance to discriminatory laws. He was charged and brought to trial for his role in the campaign and given a suspended prison sentence.Mandela and Tambo attorneysIn recognition of his contribution to the defiance campaign, Mandela was elected president of both the Youth League and the Transvaal region of the ANC at the end of 1952. He subsequently became the deputy president of the ANC.Soon after the defiance campaign, Mandela passed his attorney’s admission examination and was admitted to the profession. In 1952 he and Oliver Tambo opened a law firm in downtown Johannesburg.Tambo, the chairperson of the ANC at the time of his death in April 1993, wrote of their practice: “To reach our desks each morning Nelson and I ran the gauntlet of patient queues of people overflowing from the chairs in the waiting room into the corridors … Our buff office files carried thousands of these stories and if, when we started our law partnership, we had not been rebels against apartheid, our experiences in our offices would have remedied the deficiency. We had risen to professional status in our community, but every case in court, every visit to the prisons to interview clients, reminded us of the humiliation and suffering burning into our people.”The 1950s turned out to be a time of strife and tribulation for Mandela – he was banned, arrested and imprisoned. His personal life was also in some turmoil, with him divorcing Evelyn to marry Winnie Madikizela. He was also one of the accused in the historic Treason Trial that ended in 1961, with the state dropping all charges.The Black PimpernelIn 1960 police opened fire on a group of protesters in the township of Sharpeville, killing 69 people. The reaction was immediate, with demonstrations, protest marches, strikes and riots across South Africa. On March 30 1960, the government declared a state of emergency, detaining more than 18 000 people, and banning the ANC and other liberation movements.With the banning, the ANC leadership went underground and Mandela was forced to live away from his family. He was a master of disguise and managed to evade the police, a feat which earned him the nickname in the media as the Black Pimpernel.The banning also forced the ANC to move from nonviolent to violent means of opposing apartheid. Umkhonto we Sizwe, the movement’s armed wing, was formed in 1961, with Mandela as commander-in-chief. After travelling abroad for several months, he was arrested in 1962 on his return to South Africa for unlawfully exiting the country and for incitement to strike. Convicted, he was sentenced to five years on Robben Island, the notorious political prison off the coast near Cape Town.While serving this sentence, he was charged with sabotage in the infamous Rivonia Trial. In 1964 Mandela was sentenced to life imprisonment.Eighteen of Mandela’s 27 years in jail were spent on Robben island, where he carried out hard labour in a lime quarry. As a D-group prisoner, the lowest classification, he was allowed only one visitor and one letter every six months. While in prison Mandela studied by correspondence with the University of London, earning a Bachelor of Laws degree. In 1984 he was transferred to Pollsmoor Prison in Cape Town, and in December of that year he was moved to Victor Verster Prison near Paarl in the Western Cape.President of South AfricaOver the years, South Africa slowly descended into near-chaos, with almost constant unrest inside the country, armed insurgency from without, and steadily increasing international pressure from the international community to end apartheid. On 2 February 1990 the country’s National Party president, FW de Klerk, made a remarkable announcement: a negotiated settlement would end apartheid, all liberation movements would be unbanned, and all political prisoners released – including Nelson Mandela.Nine days later Mandela walked out of Victor Verster prison, his wife Winnie on his arm and his fist raised in the liberation movement salute.In 1991, at the first national conference of the ANC held inside South Africa after its decades-long banning, Mandela was elected president of the party. His long-time friend, Tambo, became national chairperson. In 1993 he and FW de Klerk were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for their different roles in the peaceful end of apartheid.In 1994, after South Africa’s first democratic elections, Mandela became president of the Republic of South Africa. That year he published his autobiography, Long Walk to Freedom, which he started writing in prison.After serving a five-year term as president of the country, Mandela ceded the ANC presidency to Thabo Mbeki. He retired from public life in June 1999, though not from the public eye. He built himself a home in his birthplace in Qunu, which he visits as often as he can.FriendshipsKnown affectionately by his clan name of Madiba, Mandela has friends across the world – Bill Clinton, Bono of U2, Naomi Campbell. His friendships go back in some cases 60 years, as with Walter Sisulu, Oliver Tambo and Ahmed Kathrada.In his autobiography Memoirs, Kathrada recounts that he and Mandela affectionately called one another madala, isiZulu for old man.“Charming and charismatic, he has both a magnetic personality and a commanding presence,” writes Kathrada. “An uncommon amalgam of peasant and aristocrat, he is a living paradox: a democrat par excellence, with just a touch of the autocrat; at once proud but simple; soft yet tenacious; obstinate and flexible; vain one moment and humble the next; infinitely tolerant but also impatient.”Kathrada and Mandela spent 18 years together on Robben Island and a further seven in Pollsmoor Prison, along with Sisulu.“For all the public exposure and media attention Madiba remains an enigma to all but his most intimate circle,” concludes Kathrada.He recounts an incident with a terminally ill girl, Michelle Britz, that is typical of Mandela. She wanted to meet Madiba, and when she met Kathrada on Robben Island, he got to know of her wish. Kathrada passed on her wish to the then president, who sprang into action immediately.“The president of South Africa, a universally respected statesman with one of the busiest schedules on earth, flew to the Mpumalanga town of Secunda by helicopter, bearing gifts for a sick child.“The emotional meeting between Madiba and Michelle was shown on national television, and as she clasped her little arms around his neck and kissed him, the eyes of millions must have filled with tears, just as mine did.”In his honourNelson Mandela has the freedom of 45 cities around the world, and honorary citizenship of 11 cities.In Johannesburg, Madiba’s image is cast in a 6m high bronze statue and stands preserved in his famous jive in Nelson Mandela Square.Speaking at the statue’s unveiling in April 2004, Ndileka Mandela, Madiba’s eldest granddaughter, said: “This is a very happy statue. The dancing stance pays tribute to the spirit of joy and celebration inherent in the people of South Africa.”The countless tributes to him around the world are without precedent. He has 23 schools, universities and institutions named after him; 25 halls, buildings, monuments and housing developments; 13 stadiums, squares, plazas, parks and gardens; 91 streets, roads, boulevards and parks; 32 bursaries and scholarships, foundations and lectures. Thirteen statues, sculptures and artworks carry his name.Madiba had collected dozens of accolades from around the world: 18 sports-related honours and awards, and 115 other awards.He has a range of strange items named after him: a landfill site, a spider, a seaslug, a protea, a tea, an orchid, a rescue dog, and a racehorse.Marriage, children and old ageMandela and Winnie divorced in 1996. In 1998 he married Graca Machel, widow of Samora Machel, the president of Mozambique until his death in 1986.The 18th of July 2010 will not only be Mandela’s 92nd birthday; it is also the 12th anniversary of his marriage to Machel. In a 2008 interview with Mike Hanna on the Al Jazeera television network, she describes how lonely Mandela was when she first met him.“After 27 years in jail, what he most longed for was not the glory of political life, but to have a family life,” she said. “It was a meeting of minds and a meeting of hearts.” Although she hadn’t wanted another marriage after Samora Machel’s death, she decided that her gift to Mandela on his 80th birthday would be to marry him.“Madiba has allowed me to continue to be myself. He has always respected my space. We have a deep sense of sharing, but at the same time we respect each other’s identities.“For a man of his age, a man who has gone through those kinds of experiences, he could have become extremely possessive. He’s not. Maybe that’s what love really means. We have found a balanced and respectful way of relating.”Today Mandela and Machel spend most of their time at their home in the upmarket suburb of Houghton, in Johannesburg. His greatest pleasure of his old age, he says, is watching the sun set, with the music of Handel or Tchaikovsky playing in the background.A short distance from the tranquil surrounds of Houghton, his famous words from the Rivonia Trial echo on the walls of the Drill Hall in central Johannesburg:“I have fought against white domination, and I have fought against black domination. I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. It is an ideal for which I hope to live and to achieve. But if it needs be, it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die.”last_img read more

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Congratulations for SKA South Africa

first_img28 May 2012The South African Chamber of Commerce and Industry (Sacci) on Monday joined President Jacob Zuma in congratulating the Department of Science and Technology and its partners for winning the right to co-host the the €1.5-billion Square Kilometre Array (SKA) radio telescope.The SKA Organisation announced on Friday that South Africa and Australia are to share the hosting of the SKA, an instrument 50-100 times more sensitive and 10 000 times faster than any radio imaging telescope yet built.The two biggest components of the SKA will be built in Africa, while one will be built in Australia. About 70% of the facility will be built in Africa.“The SKA will significantly support the expansion of South Africa’s knowledge economy in general and high-technology industry specifically,” said the chamber’s CEO, Neren Rau. “The skills transfer will assist in addressing the skills challenge in South Africa.”Rau said the announcement showed the potential South Africa to play a leading role in science and technology on the global stage.Sacci said the fact that the project was a collaborative project between South Africa and Botswana, Ghana, Kenya, Madagascar, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia and Zambia, was a positive step forward in building stronger research and commercial ties with other African countries.President Jacob Zuma, in his message of congratulations, said: “Africa is indeed rising. South Africa is confident that the country will deliver on the expectations of the continent and world.”The SKA will consist of about 3 000 dish-shaped antennae spread over a wide area. Scientists are expected to use the SKA to search the universe for answers about how stars and galaxies were formed and how the universe has evolved over the past 14-billion years.South Africa is expected to build the telescope in the Karoo in the Northern Cape, while the joint site spreads from the Murchison Shire in Western Australia’s Mid-West region to the top of New Zealand’s South Island.Building is expected to start around 2016 and the telescope to be completed by 2024.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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It’s Time to Plan for Electric Vehicles on the Grid

first_imgPrograms and incentives drive booming market growthIn the U.S., a variety of state and federal tax incentives, other local benefits, and deployment targets are supporting double-digit growth rates in EV adoption and charging-station installation:California aims to have 1.5 million EVs on the road by 2025 — a more than 600% increase over the roughly 200,000 EVs it has today — along with the supporting charging infrastructure. And the three big investor-owned utilities in California are developing programs to radically increase the number of charging stations available in their territories, under a variety of innovative programs.Nine states have followed suit on California’s Zero Emissions Vehicles program, which sets goals for manufacturers to sell EVs. Several states have begun to transition their fleets of state vehicles over to EVs.The Drive Clean Seattle program aims to increase EV adoption by 400% and get 15,000 EVs on the road in the city by 2025, as well as to triple the number of publicly available fast chargers.The City of Indianapolis intends to replace its entire gasoline-powered fleet with EVs by 2025. The City of Houston now has one-quarter of its fleet plugged in. New York City plans to create the largest municipal electric vehicle fleet in the country.Group purchase programs in Colorado for Nissan Leafs quadrupled sales in Boulder, and increased sales by a factor of six in northern Colorado.So, although EVs are a small part of the fleet (0.16%) and of new vehicle sales (0.7%) in the U.S. now, watch out: Their adoption could follow the path of other disruptive technologies, like cell phones and internet access, and become ubiquitous in an astonishingly short time.This is particularly likely as the world begins making real strides toward its climate change targets. Bloomberg New Energy Finance estimates that electric vehicles could account for 35% of all new vehicle sales worldwide by 2040, as the price of long-range EVs falls to less than $22,000 and drivers begin to appreciate how much cheaper they are to drive than internal combustion vehicles. BY CHRIS NELDERIf you think electric vehicles are still a niche technology, think again. The International Energy Agency (IEA) estimates that more than 1 million electric vehicles (EVs) were on the road in 2015, including 400,000 in the United States. In order to limit global warming to 2 C° or less, the agency says the world will need 150 million EVs by 2030 and 1 billion by 2050, implying a 21% compound annual growth rate from now until 2050.India is considering a state-financed plan that would let drivers buy EVs for zero money down, then pay for the vehicles out of gasoline savings. The plan aims to transition India’s entire fleet to electric vehicles by 2030.China also is aiming to have a fully electrified fleet, eventually, and has a target of putting 5 million battery-electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles on the road by 2020. EV sales there quadrupled to more than 247,000 last year, more than double the 115,000 sold in the U.S.EVs already have a larger market share in Norway, at 17%, than anywhere else in the world, and although the country is not banning the sale of gasoline and diesel vehicles, as recent reports suggested, it is formulating targets for zero-emission vehicles in order to reach climate goals. RELATED ARTICLES How will your decisions help or hamper the grid of the future?But the EV revolution will need more than utilities and regulators to support it; many of us have important roles to play. A new report from RMI’s Electricity Innovation Lab (eLab), Electric Vehicles as Distributed Energy Resources, developed in conjunction with the Regulatory Assistance Project and San Diego Gas and Electric, identifies best practices for elected officials, vehicle manufacturers, regulators, utilities, and other stakeholders, as well as important considerations for consumers and consumer advocates.Among other things, we have to ensure that charging stations are installed and available at the right time and place for drivers to use them. But what that means may vary by state and utility grid. We have to ensure that EVs are affordable and practical for the broadest possible cross section of drivers, as a matter of social equity. And we need to influence, with increasing precision, where and when EVs are charged through a combination of partnerships, incentives, and market structures. In its early stages, the interesting challenges and opportunities related to vehicle grid integration will be local or even hyperlocal, at the scales where grid-related issues will first emerge.By working together and managing EV charging so that it happens at the right times and places, EVs can be integrated into the electricity system in ways that deliver net benefits to utility customers, shareholders, vehicle owners, and society at large. EVs currently have a 10% market share in the Netherlands, which is discussing the possibility of banning the sale of gasoline vehicles and only allowing EV sales by 2025. Can We Power Our Car With the Sun?How Green Is Your Car? As Electric Cars Stall, A Move to Greener Trucks and BusesWill Self-Driving Cars Save Energy?The Downside of Low Gas PricesElectric Vehicles Hit a Pothole in CaliforniaNew Life for Old Electric Vehicle BatteriesPlan for California Vehicle Charging Stations on HoldMinnesota OKs Special Rates for Electric VehiclesAn Indiana Utility Offers Free Car ChargesA Charger in Every GarageMore Tips for Improving MileageHouses Versus CarsUsing Parked Electric Cars For Peak ShavingRunning Our House on Prius Power Utilities: Be preparedIf utilities and their regulators are not prepared for such a rapid expansion of the EV fleet, it could have negative effects on the grid. The life of grid infrastructure components could be shortened and greater investment in peak capacity could be required, making the grid less efficient, increasing the unit costs of electricity for all consumers, inhibiting the integration of renewables, increasing grid power emissions, and making the grid less stable.But if utilities and regulators anticipate rapid EV growth and plan accordingly by implementing the right incentives and tariff structures, EVs could become an incredibly valuable grid asset, and actually reduce the cost of electricity by helping to optimize the grid so that it operates more efficiently.EVs can enable the growth of wind and solar on the grid by absorbing their output when it is greatest, helping utilities avoid new investment in grid infrastructure, reducing electricity and transportation costs, reducing petroleum consumption and emissions, improving energy security, and supplying ancillary services to the grid, such as frequency regulation and power factor correction.Utilities should prepare for a rapid adoption of EVs for another reason: avoiding undue stress on the electricity distribution network. EVs with high-capacity batteries, such as the 30 kWh 2016 Nissan Leaf, can consume as much electricity as the average U.S. residence consumes in a day. In order to avoid overloading distribution grid components, utilities will need to either invest in expensive grid upgrades or offer electricity rate structures that encourage vehicle owners to recharge their vehicles when grid power demand is low. Managing charging patterns is already important for neighborhoods with more than three or four EVs in places such as San Diego and Silicon Valley. Chris Nelder is a manager with the Rocky Mountain Institute’s electricity practice. This post originally appeared at the RMI Outlet.last_img read more

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Venus Williams to play World TeamTennis for Washington

first_imgVenus Williams of the United States pauses between points as she plays Spain’s Garbine Muguruza in the Women’s Singles final match on day twelve at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London Saturday, July 15, 2017. (David Ramos/Pool Photo via AP)NEW YORK — Venus Williams, Maria Sharapova and John Isner will headline World TeamTennis, which begins its 42nd season on Sunday.Williams, who finished runner-up at Wimbledon on Saturday, will play her sixth season for the Washington Kastles. She’ll travel to Philadelphia to face the Freedoms on July 24 and be home for the Springfield (Missouri) Lasers on July 25.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Harden plans to be in Houston ‘forever’ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim FEU Auditorium’s 70th year celebrated with FEU Theater Guild’s ‘The Dreamweavers’ Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Trump strips away truth with hunky topless photo tweet El Nido residents told to vacate beach homes Church, environmentalists ask DENR to revoke ECC of Quezon province coal plant MOST READ National Coffee Research Development and Extension Center brews the 2nd National Coffee Education Congress The six-team coed league also features Wimbledon semifinalist Sam Querrey and Australian Nick Kyrgios on the Kastles.Sharapova recently returned to the WTA after a doping ban and skipped Wimbledon because of a thigh injury. She plays for the Orange County Breakers, who face the defending champion San Diego Aviators on Sunday.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsIsner and Eugenie Bouchard play for the New York Empire.The WTT final is Aug. 5 in San Diego. Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ LATEST STORIES View commentslast_img read more

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Ind vs Eng: India lose series and No. 1 Test rank to England

first_imgEngland snatched away the No. 1 Test ranking from India beating them by an innings and 242-run margin during the third Test at Edgbaston in Birmingham on Saturday. Score | PhotosEngland claimed the number-one ranking in the ICC Test Championship table for the first time in 32 years.In terms of runs, the 1958 loss against West Indies at Eden Gardens is the worst of India’s losses. India had lost that match by an innings and 336 runs.The win also gave them an unassailable 3-0 lead in the four-match Test series. India managed to ward off their worst ever defeat in their Test cricket history spanning 454 matches.The visitors started their campaign on the fourth day with an overnight total of 35/1 – a deficit of 451-runs from England’s first innings.On Friday, James Anderson had claimed Sehwag on the first ball that he faced during the innings. In the first innings too Sehwag had lost his wicket on the first ball to Stuart Broad.Saturday didn’t get off too well with the visitors as opener Gautam Gambhir lost his wicket on the first ball that he faced on the day. An away moving ball from Anderson was tamely pushed towards Graeme Swann in the slips. He fell for 14 and India lost their second wicket without adding a run to their overnight total of 35.Dravid too did not last long and fell on a identical ball from Anderson. However, the edge off his bat was too thin and caught carried away towards the wicketkeeper Matt Prior.advertisementDravid fell for 18 and India went down to 40/3. Later, the Hot-Spot didn’t show any edge. Dravid could have been batting had he reviewed it. In fact even Dravid wasn’t too sure whether he had nicked it, but it was strange he decided to walk back.Anderson, who was in good nick, came around to get rid of Laxman on two and India were looking down the barrel with 56/4 on board.Can you beat this, Raina asked for a review on that one? Does he not know that LBW’s are not under the DRS purview. His appeal was turned down by on-field umpire Steve Davis.Then it was turn of offie Swann to polish his wares and he did it in style by trapping left-hander Suresh Raina cheaply and India lost their fifth wicket on 87. In fact, Raina could have walked by earlier, had England captain Andrew Strauss not dropped him at gully off Swann.Sachin, who was holding fort at the other end, got run out in a very unfortunate manner. A straight and low drive off skipper MS Dhoni touched the finger tips of bowler Graeme Swann and went on to strike against the stumps at the other end and Sachin was off his crease. He fell for 40 and India lost their sixth wicket on 89.At lunch India were 116/6 with skipper Dhoni and tail-ender Amit Mishra in the middle. They were trailing by a massive 370 runs at the stage.Straight into the second session, Amit Mishra departed. He played an aerial shot off Swann, but failed to clear Stuart Broad in the extra cover region. India lost their seventh wicket on 130.Towards the end of their innings, Praveen Kumar and Dhoni belted a few boundaries and over the fence shots to help India keep afloat and sty clear of their worst defeat ever.But, Praveen short blitz came to an end in Broad’s over. He wanted to whack him towards the long on boundary, but a top edge got carried away towards Ravi Bopara near mid-wicket. He fell for 40 after belting five fours and three sixes. In process he even injured the thumb of his right hand.Ishant Sharma, too did not stay for long and fell LWB to Broad with lone ranger Dhoni holding fort in this innings as well. He scored an unbeaten 74.Within minutes India’s innings folded and England went on to become the Number One Test team in the World grabbing an unassailable 3-0 lead in the four match series.The two sides next meet on August 18 at the Kennington Oval in London.last_img read more

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Moore Stephens Shipping Needs to Improve Risk Management

first_imgzoom Not enough companies in the shipping industry are following joined-up risk management procedures, according to international accountant and shipping adviser Moore Stephens.The second annual Moore Stephens Shipping Risk Survey revealed a fall in the overall level of satisfaction on the part of respondents that sound risk management had contributed to the success of their organisations. The involvement of senior management in managing risk at the highest level also declined against last year.Respondents to the survey rated the extent to which enterprise and business risk management is contributing to the success of their organisation at an average 6.6, on a scale of 1 (low) to 10 (high), compared to 6.9 last time. Under a quarter of respondents (23%) returned a rating of 8.0, compared to 26% last time, while 70% put the figure at more than 5.0 out of 10.0, as opposed to 74% in 2015.Overall, respondents rated the extent to which enterprise and business risk was being managed effectively by their organisations at 7.0 out of 10.0 (unchanged from last time).Demand trends were deemed by the greatest number of respondents to pose the highest level of risk to their organisation, closely followed by competition, with the cost and availability of finance in third place.“The survey revealed that risk is being managed effectively within a high percentage of those organisations which participated in the survey. It is nonetheless disappointing to find that confidence in the level to which enterprise and business risk management contributes to the success of shipping organisations has fallen slightly in the past 12 months. So, too, has high-level involvement by senior managers,” Michael Simms, Moore Stephens Partner, Shipping & Transport, said.Simms added that the current rating of 7.0 out of 10.0 in respect of the level of effective management of risk at companies which participated in the survey is not too discouraging, however, “it needs to be higher, as does the figure of just over 40% of companies which formally document the management of risk.”last_img read more

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