Month: October 2019

WHATS SHOOTING IN BC – AS OF APR1518 – LINKS BY UBCPACTRA

first_imgWHAT’S SHOOTING IN BC – AS OF APR-15-18CREATIVE BC – CLICK HEREUBCP/ACTRA – FILM/TV PRODUCTIONS – CLICK HERE – 6-PAGE PDF LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisement UBCP/ACTRA – ULTRA LOW BUDGET PRODUCTIONS – CLICK HERE – 1-PAGE PDFWHAT’S FILMING – CLICK HERE.LOOKING FOR A JOB?  CHECK OUT OUR CASTING, JOB & CREW NOTICESCASTING A PRODUCTION? HIRING CREW? POST YOUR NOTICE HERETO VIEW OR POST CASTING NOTICES: CLICK HERETO VIEW OR POST CREW & JOB NOTICES: CLICK HERE.ARE YOU A FREELANCER?  CREW?  DO YOU WORK BEHIND THE SCENES?ARE YOU A PRODUCTION COMPANY?DO YOU PROVIDE A SERVICE TO THE INDUSTRY?ADD YOUR COMPANY (OR YOUR SERVICES) TO THE PRODUCTION DIRECTORYIt’s FREE to add your company to the eBOSS PRODUCTION DIRECTORYCLICK HERE.DEALS AND DISCOUNTSCheck out our deals page for discounts on events, restaurants, industry services, health and fitness, auto services and much more – CLICK HERE.FOLLOW eBOSS CANADA ON SOCIAL MEDIA  The Entertainment Business One-Stop ShopFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/eboss.canada/Twitter: https://twitter.com/eBOSSCanadaInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/eBOSSCanada/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/ebosscanada.DOWNLOAD THE eBOSS CANADA APPFor up-to-date News, Job Notices, Casting Notices, Events, and much more Advertisement Twitter Facebook Login/Register With:last_img read more

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Our dark night is turning to day country stars put on uplifting

first_imgAdvertisement Login/Register With: They came with a hope to lift people’s spirits, just for one night, and under a Broncos’ green stage, country musicians put on an electrifying, upbeat show on Friday night that came in stark contrast to the sadness of the weeks before.Survivors of the Humboldt Broncos’ bus crash, and families of those impacted by the April 6 tragedy, had front row seats at a Saskatoon concert that featured star-studded talent, including Dallas Smith, Chad Brownlee, Brett Kissel and Jess Moskaluke.Those family members exchanged smiles and hugs, while some got on their feet and danced through the performances.Stage lit up Bronco green #HumboldtStrong pic.twitter.com/tiQpJnYqqT— Bridget Yard (@YardCBC) April 27, 2018 Advertisement SaskTel Centre filling up for Humboldt Broncos’ tribute concert. pic.twitter.com/QUARutvZte— Olivia Stefanovich (@CBCOlivia) April 28, 2018‘Tonight, it’s OK for us to smile,’ says premierAs he thanked first responders and medical staff for their response in the wake of the tragedy that claimed the lives of 16 people, Premier Scott Moe said the province has been through a dark time but that there was light on the horizon. Advertisementcenter_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Dallas Smith performs during the Country Thunder Humboldt Broncos tribute concert in Saskatoon on Friday. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Liam Richards) Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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ENTER TO WIN AN ONSET EXPERIENCE ON THE TV SERIES CARDINAL –

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement CONTEST PAGE:  https://www.ctv.ca/Cardinal/ContestCARDINAL FACEBOOK PAGE:  https://www.facebook.com/CardinalCTV/RULES AND REGULATIONS:  https://www.ctv.ca/Cardinal/Contest/Legal/Rules-RegulationsMissed an episode, or a season? Watch all past episodes of @CardinalCTV now on https://t.co/2UEpgHd4gp and catch new episodes Thursday at 9/10mt. pic.twitter.com/lPsmU22Y8E— CTV (@CTV) January 29, 2019ABOUT CARDINAL:  The six-part, bone-chilling drama follows Detective John Cardinal (Billy Campbell) and partner, Detective Lise Delorme (Karine Vanasse) on a deadly hunt for a vicious killer in small Northern Ontario town. From Entertainment One (eOne) and Sienna Films, CARDINAL is directed by award-winning Montréal director Daniel Grou, aka Podz (19-2, MINUIT LE SOIR), CARDINAL was adapted for television by Canadian Screen Award-winner Aubrey Nealon (ORPHAN BLACK, SAVING HOPE) from award-winning author Giles Blunt’s John Cardinal Mysteries series. Featuring Golden Globe® nominee Billy Campbell (THE KILLING) in the title role, CARDINAL also stars multiple Genie Award-winning actress Karine Vanasse (REVENGE) as his rookie partner, Detective Lise Delorme. The series also stars Brendan Fletcher (The Revenant) as Eric Fraser and Allie MacDonald as Edie Soames, a young couple in the town. Also appearing are Deborah Hay as Cardinal’s wife Catherine; Glen Gould as fellow officer Jerry Commanda; Kristen Thomson (Away from Her) as Sergeant Noelle Dyson, Cardinal’s commanding officer; David Richmond Peck (ORPHAN BLACK) as Corporal Musgrave, an officer in charge of a tightly guarded investigation; Alanna Bale as Cardinal’s daughter Kelly; and Robert Naylor (19-2) as Keith. GET ON THE CASE WITH CARDINAL SEASON 4!Enter for a chance to win an on-set experience by watching the latest episode of Cardinal Season 3 Login/Register With:center_img Twitter Advertisement Advertisement Facebooklast_img read more

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SIX SHOWS YOU SHOULD SEE AT THE TORONTO FRINGE FESTIVAL

first_img.. Advertisement Advertisement Twitter Our brains choose the most opportune moments to dwell on our deepest insecurities and overwhelming concerns, don’t they? In Night Feed, Sarah Joy Bennett and her collaborators literally bring these late-night tormentors to life through the bloodshot eyes of a new mother (played by Corinne Murray). In the middle of the night, as she breastfeeds her infant daughter — a puppet created by Reiter, with a hinged mouth designed to latch or scream — objects in her apartment taunt her. Her bike tries to seduce her into a nighttime ride, a clock has an existential crisis, a breast pump coaches her on the cringeworthy transition back to work, dust bunnies copulate behind the couch. Bennett and Mohr are engaging puppeteers who create a dreamlike, sleep-deprived sensation with their physicality and vocals while giving each puppet a unique personality. Murray’s understated performance keeps the show grounded; with a believable mix of exhaustion, anxiety and patience, she cradles her puppet baby with such care that the emotional payoff of the conclusion hits right at home. There has never before been a combination as earnest and pure as the Toronto Fringe, musical theatre and a bunch of passionate teens. Drama 101 is a collaboration between composer Kevin Wong (The Preposterous Predicament of Polly Peel), writer Steven Gallagher (The Last Party) and the youth theatre training company Bravo Academy, which transforms its greatest strength — the enthusiasm of its 14-member cast, all aged between 13 and 19 — into the foundation of the musical’s concept and plot. The students of Drama 101 are throwing a retirement party for their beloved teacher Mrs. Chang and, as preparations continue, each character reveals through song how the class and their love of the performing arts have impacted their lives. Wong and Gallagher weave in musical theatre references including recent teenage obsessions (Dear Evan Hansen, Be More Chill, Hamilton, Wicked) and classics (Guys and Dolls, West Side Story) but have clearly tapped into the true perspectives of their cast: from social anxiety, to romance, to the eternal divide between the actors and the stage crew. Drama 101 is a heartfelt, unapologetic love letter to theatre that belongs to these kids and this festival.—Carly MagaNight FeedWritten by Sarah Joy Bennett. Created in collaboration with Ginette Mohr and Shawna Reiter. Tarragon Theatre Extraspace, 30 Bridgman Ave..In Night Feed, a new mother (Corinne Murray) is taunted by objects in her apartment as she breastfeeds her daughter in the middle of the night. DAHLIA KATZ / COURTESY TORONTO FRINGE Advertisementcenter_img So far, the 2019 Toronto Fringe Festival has revealed an embarrassment of riches in unconventional packages. On top of the breakout solo shows and new musicals that populate the Fringe circuit, the Toronto Star’s theatre critics have ventured into more unexpected territory of audio plays, mime and puppetry, braving oppressive humidity and rainstorms along the way.Here are some of the Star’s favourite Fringe shows, which you can catch before the festival ends Sunday — or before they sell out. All performances are on until July 14.Drama 101: A New MusicalWritten by Kevin Wong and Steven Gallagher. Directed by Gallagher. Robert Gill Theatre, 214 College St. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Login/Register With: The young stars of Drama 101: A New Musical, in which the real-life theatre students of Bravo Academy play theatre students planning a party for a beloved teacher. BLAKE CRAWFORD / COURTESY TORONTO FRINGElast_img read more

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CINEMATOGRAPHER ROGER DEAKINS TO GET AWARD AT TORONTO FILM FESTIVAL

first_imgRoger Deakins accepts the award for best cinematography for “Blade Runner 2049” at the Oscars on Sunday, March 4, 2018, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. Venerable cinematographer Deakins will be honoured at next month’s Toronto International Film Festival. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP Login/Register With: Facebook Advertisement Deakins’ previous Oscar nominations include work on “Sicario,” “Skyfall,” “True Grit,” “Fargo,” “No Country for Old Men” and “The Shawshank Redemption.”His latest work will be seen in the “The Goldfinch,” which will have its world premiere at the Toronto festival.As previously announced, the TIFF Tribute Gala fundraiser on Sept. 9 will also honour actors Meryl Streep and Joaquin Phoenix, and filmmaker Taika Waititi.Streep and Phoenix will each get a TIFF Tribute acting award while Waititi will receive the TIFF Ebert director’s award.The Toronto film fest runs Sept. 5 to 15.The Canadian Press TORONTO — Venerable cinematographer Roger Deakins will be honoured at next month’s Toronto International Film Festival.The 14-time Oscar nominee, who won the golden statuette last year for “Blade Runner 2049,” will get the Variety Artisan Award at the TIFF Tribute Gala.TIFF says the award “recognizes a distinguished filmmaker who has excelled at their craft and made an outstanding contribution to cinema.”center_img Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

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A closer look at AFN national chief candidates with Mohawk scholar Taiaiake

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe campaign for national chief of the Assembly of First Nations is in full swing.APTN National News host Cheryl McKenzie dissects the large field of candidates with Mohawk professor and author Taiaiake Alfred.Taiaiake is chair of Indigenous governance at the University of Victoria.last_img

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Pilot program 247 aims to reduce homelessness in Edmonton

first_imgAPTN National NewsWith the help of a new pilot program called “24/7” a young mother of three children, who has been on the streets for four months, is turning her life around.The Edmonton project has not only helped her to find a new apartment, it is also given her a sense of hope.APTN’s Keith Laboucan brings us the story.last_img

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Mikmaq football player making quarterbacks quake for undefeated Mounties

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Mount Allison University football team is defending their record season.A Mi’kmaq player on the defensive line is showing big potential.Rookie Shaun Robinson is making family and friends proud on and off the field.APTN’s Trina Roache has this story.last_img

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First Nations optimistic yet fearful a year after Mount Polley disaster

first_imgAPTN National NewsThis past Wednesday marked the one-year anniversary of the massive Mount Polley environmental disaster in British Columbia.Millions of cubic metres of waste rushed into the surrounding lakes and streams. People’s lives were turned upside down. They feared for their health and jobs.Members of the local First Nation communities are both cautiously optimistic and fearful.The leadership has united and is demanding sweeping industry reforms.APTN’s Rob Smith has the story.last_img read more

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Female First Nations leader says Winnipeg store treated her life a thief

first_imgMatt Thordarson APTN National NewsAn Indigenous leader is claiming she was discriminated against while shopping at a pharmacy in Winnipeg.Sheila North Wilson is grand chief of Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak in Manitoba.She’s speaking out now because she wants her story to bring awareness.last_img

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Gustafsen Lake warrior granted political asylum in US wants return home to

first_img(A screen grab of the truck James “OJ” Pitawanakwat was driving on Sept. 11, 1995, moments before it hit an RCMP IED during the Gustafsen Lake standoff. YouTube)Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsA Wikwemikong man who was given political asylum in the U.S. following the 1995 Gustafsen Lake armed standoff in British Columbia wants to return to Canada.James “OJ” Pitawanakwat, 44, has lived in the U.S. since August 1998 when he crossed the border while on day parole in Canada.The U.S. Federal Court for the District of Oregon denied Canada’s extradition request for Pitawanakwat in November 2000 on grounds his actions in B.C. were “of a political character” and qualified for an exemption under the extradition treaty between Canada and the U.S.“I would like to go back home to live and come and go throughout Canada and come and go throughout the U.S. without this harassment,” said Pitawanakwat, who is originally from Wikwemikong on Manitoulin Island in Ontario.He said there is still an active warrant out for his arrest in Canada.Pitawanakwat was convicted by a B.C. court in 1997 of mischief and possession of a weapon for a purpose dangerous to the public peace in connection to his involvement in the summer standoff which saw more gunfire exchanged between warriors and police than during the 1990 Oka Crisis.He was sentenced to three years in prison, but was released on day parole after one year. Nine days into his day parole, Pitawanakwat, who was in Surrey, B.C., at the time, said he “just walked right across” the U.S. border. As a First Nation man, Pitawanakwat can legally live on both sides of the border.“I eventually started going across American and showing people the video of the truck explosion,” said Pitawanakwat.(John “Splitting the Sky” Hill describes explosion triggered by RCMP IED. YouTube)The video of the truck explosion is one of the most striking images of the Gustafsen Lake standoff.  It was Sept. 11, 1995, and Pitawanakwat was driving with a woman activist, an AK-47 along with a rifle inside the pick-up truck, his dog Idaho in the back. They were roaring down a logging road when they hit an RCMP installed improvised explosive device (IED). The truck flipped in a plume of dirt and smoke, Pitawanakwat and the woman managed to escape the vehicle, but Idaho was shot by an RCMP sniper.“I remember driving down the road and then an explosion just rocked my world and disorientated me for a quick minute and my combat senses kicked-in and survival set in,” he said. “I relive that moment every day of my life.”Pitawanakwat said he and the activist managed to cross the lake where a cache of weapons was hidden. Some of the other warriors also arrived and began to open fire on the RCMP’s Bison armoured personnel carrier, borrowed from the Canadian Forces.“When I reached the treeline I armed myself and returned to the guts of the conflict on the battle field. The armoured personnel carrier was disabled by small arms fire and by the trees. It knocked out the steering column,” he said. “We just put suppression fire on the other Bison when it started roaring out of nowhere and was shooting people. It was straight out war.”James “OJ” Pitawanakwat during the Gustafsen Lake standoff in 1995. YouTubeThe Gustafsen Lake standoff centred on land leased by the province to a rancher near 100 Mile House, B.C., that was used for Sundance ceremonies. The land, which was never surrendered, was reclaimed by the Ts’Peten Defenders in 1995 who refused to leave despite attempts by the rancher to evict them.The RCMP intervened, and, with support from the Canadian Forces, faced down the Ts’Peten Defenders, who numbered between 30 to 40 people, according to the U.S. Federal Court record.Things escalated in mid-August when Defenders spokesperson William “Wolverine” Jones Ignace said if the RCMP moved into the camp it would be “clearly war…We’re not going to go peaceful. Body bags or do a hell of a long stretch…Nobody is going to tell you to put your weapons down,” according to the court record.The RCMP and the Canadian Forces, working through Operation Wallaby, set up a base camp called Camp Zulu which included armoured personnel carriers, helicopters, a field hospital, communication centre, military assault weapons and a tactical unit of about 400 “heavily armed militarized police,” according to U.S. court records.After several incidents, which saw tens of thousands of rounds exchanged between both sides, the Defenders’ camp surrendered by Sept. 17, 1995.There were 18 people, 13 men and five women, at the camp by the stand-off’s end. All 18 were convicted by a jury following a 10-month trial, according to the U.S. court record.Despite Canada issuing a warrant for his arrest shortly after he fled across the U.S. border, Pitawanakwat managed to evade capture for a little less than two years.He was finally arrested in Lincoln City, Ore., in June 2000, after he went out to buy pizza on his bicycle.“I found out U.S. Marshals were on my tail. One morning they swooped in and got me,” he said. “They converged on me, on my bike and I fled into the thorns. They arrested me and took me to Portland, Ore.”James “OJ” Pitawanakwat, 44, in Mount Pleasant Michigan. He wants to come home to Canada. Photo courtesy of family.U.S. Federal Court Judge Janice Stewart, however, denied Canada’s request for extradition, ruling that Pitawanakwat’s activities at Gustafsen Lake qualified for exemption under the extradition treaty for activity of “a political character.”“The Lake Gustafsen incident involved Indigenous people rising up in their own land against the government of that land. Although the crimes were committed while trespassing and occupying private property, the type of property occupied makes this case unique,” said Stewart, in her ruling. “(The rancher) acquired title to the land through the Canadian government, but this land included tribal land over which Native people believed they had a valid legal claim. Thus, the protest by the Ts’Peten Defenders was directed largely against the Canadian government which had granted (the title)…In addition, the violence was aimed…at the Canadian government and its military forces.”Pitawanakwat was preparing to find a lawyer to help build his case for a final return to Canada earlier this year, but tragedy struck his life in Mount Pleasant, Mich., when his step-son attacked both his mother and Pitawanakwat with a knife.Juan Romero, 22, is accused of stabbing his mother in the face. Pitawanakwat said he was stabbed seven times. Local reports say he was flown to hospital with multiple stab wounds.Romero is currently undergoing a psychiatric assessment and his case is on hold, according to an Isabella County court official. Romero is facing two counts of assault with intent to murder, among other charges.Pitawanakwat was also hit with a sexual assault related charge shortly after the incident, but the case was dismissed on Sept. 10, 2015, according to a court official.“The prosecuting attorney was not ready to proceed with the case,” said the court official.The prosecutor Robert Holmes did not return a call seeking comment.Pitawanakwat’s desire to return to Canada is getting support from one of the most prominent members of the Gustafson Lake standoff, Secwepemc Elder “Wolverine” Ignace.Wolverine recently wrote Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould a letter requesting they call a public inquiry into the events of the 1995 standoff.“Such an inquiry would expose the Canadian government’s genocidal relationship with Indigenous peoples,” said Wolverine, in an emailed response to questions from APTN. “Specifically, the cover-up of the genocidal actions of the federal provincial government during the Ts’Peten-Gustafsen standoff of 1995.”Wolverine said he hoped an inquiry would help allow Pitawanakwat to return home.“James has been in exile for 20 years,” he said. “As an Indigenous man, he has the right to come home. He is an adopted member of (Wolverine’s family), of the Secwepemc Nation as a whole.”Wolverine has also called for a gathering of “Allied” Tribes to meet on Sunday in Secwepemc territory to discuss the recent call for a national inquiry into the 1995 standoff and Pitawanakwat’s return.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

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Chinas GAC to scrap Trumpsounding brand for US market

first_imgDETROIT – Chinese automaker GAC Motor will scrap the brand name it uses in China when it enters the U.S. market next year because it could be confused with President Donald Trump’s surname.For the past eight years, GAC has sold cars and SUVs under the brand Trumpchi in its home market, but is now researching new names before the company’s expected U.S. debut in the fourth quarter of 2019.“We want to provide the best service for American customers, so we want to not be closely linked with politics,” Wang Qiujing, president of GAC Engineering Institute China, said through an interpreter in an interview at the Detroit auto show. “This is the reason we want to rename the brand.”GAC picked the Chinese name Trumpchi in 2010, well before Trump was elected. The similarity to Trump is just a coincidence, Wang added. GAC will continue to use Trumpchi in China, where the word means legend and good fortune.GAC’s first vehicle in the U.S. will be the GS8, a loaded-out full-size SUV that will cost about $35,000. Two more vehicles are being researched for U.S. sales, but have not been selected yet.The company showed seven different of its models on a video and unveiled two more at the Detroit show. One is a gull-wing compact electric SUV called the Enverge, which is still in the concept phase. The automaker says it will go over 370 miles on a single charge. Also unveiled was the GA4 midsize sedan that will go on sale in China later this month.The GS8 would be comparable to a big luxury SUV, many of which go for more than $60,000. Wang said he didn’t know what the brand’s lowest-price vehicle would be in the U.S.GAC sold just over 500,000 automobiles in China last year, up 37 per cent from 2016.The company says it is negotiating with partner Fiat Chrysler about possible distribution of vehicles. Wang said GAC is the top-ranked domestic brand for initial quality in China in J.D.Power and Associates surveys, and it ranks fourth or fifth when joint ventures with foreign automakers are included. He says the company’s vehicle quality will be ready for U.S. buyers, and it will work with U.S. partners to meet stricter U.S. safety standards.Chinese automakers are advanced and have expertise in mass production but the American market may not be ready yet to accept GAC, said Jake Fisher, Consumer Reports’ director of auto testing.Other Chinese companies showed vehicles at the CES gadget show in Las Vegas last week such as Byton, which unveiled an electric prototype that’s like a Tesla Model X SUV but costs thousands less, Fisher said.“There will be Chinese automakers at the top of the market and at the bottom of the market, and it will be very interesting to see how they are received,” he said.GAC already has a research centre in Silicon Valley and is working on another one in Detroit, as well as a Los Angeles design centre. Initially it will import vehicles from China but depending on sales, plans to build a factory in the U.S.GAC, which stands for Guangzhou Automobile Group Co., also plans to enter other global markets after the U.S., including Europe.____Auto Writer Dee-Ann Durbin contributed to this report.last_img read more

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Shutdown less likely as Senate closes in on budget agreement

first_imgWASHINGTON – Buoyed by the sudden likelihood of a budget pact, lawmakers are on track to avoid a repeat of last month’s government shutdown — though President Donald Trump unexpectedly raised the possibility of closing things down again if he can’t have his way on immigration.“I’d love to see a shutdown if we can’t get this stuff taken care of,” Trump declared Tuesday, repeating the sentiment for emphasis.Trump’s comments were strikingly disconnected from the progress on Capitol Hill, where the House passed a short-term spending measure Tuesday night and Senate leaders were closing in on a larger, long-term pact ahead of a Thursday night deadline. The broader agreement would award whopping spending increases to both the Pentagon and domestic federal programs, as well as approve overdue disaster relief money and, perhaps, crucial legislation to increase the government’s borrowing limit and avoid possible default.Democratic leaders have dropped their strategy of using the funding fight to extract concessions on immigration, specifically on seeking extended protections for the “Dreamer” immigrants who have lived in the country illegally since they were children. Instead, the Democrats prepared to cut a deal that would reap tens of billions of dollars for other priorities — including combatting opioids — while taking their chances on solving the immigration impasse later.Tuesday night’s 245-182 House vote, mostly along party lines, set the machinery in motion. The six-week stopgap spending bill contains increases for the military that long have been demanded by Trump and his GOP allies. But the measure appears increasingly likely to be rewritten by the Senate to include legislation implementing the brewing broader budget pact.House Democrats cancelled a scheduled three-day retreat on Maryland’s Eastern Shore to develop a strategy for the midterm elections. A spokeswoman blamed the cancellation on “the pressing issues Congress will likely vote on over the next three days.”The budget negotiations, conducted chiefly by the Senate’s top leaders, Republican Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and Chuck Schumer of New York, have intensified in recent days — and the looming government shutdown at midnight Thursday added urgency to the talks. In addition to the military and domestic spending, the deal taking shape would approve overdue disaster relief money and, perhaps, crucial legislation to increase the government’s borrowing limit and avoid possible default.Both McConnell and Schumer reported progress Tuesday morning.“I think we’re on the way to getting an agreement and getting it very soon,” said McConnell.Prospects for dealing with immigration, however, were as fuzzy as ever. The Senate is slated next week to begin a debate to address the dilemma of immigrants left vulnerable by the looming expiration of former President Barack Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA.Weeks of bargaining have left the two parties divided over how to extend protections for such Dreamer immigrants and a court ruling has blunted a March 5 deadline.McConnell said Tuesday that while he hopes “we will end up having something,” he was unsure if any proposed measure would get the 60 votes needed for approval.On Tuesday, White House chief of staff John Kelly threw fuel on the dispute as he defended Trump’s proposed solution. The retired general noted the White House proposal would expand protection for some 1.8 million immigrants. That group includes both the 690,000 currently shielded and also “the people that some would say were too afraid to sign up, others would say were too lazy to get off their asses, but they didn’t sign up,” he said.No. 2 Senate Democratic leader Dick Durbin of Illinois, his party’s chief immigration negotiator, bristled at the comment.“I’m sorry for that characterization. It doesn’t surprise me from Gen. Kelly,” he said.The budget talks appeared to be going more smoothly.GOP defence hawks were prevailing over the party’s depleted ranks of deficit hawks, championing major new spending on military programs. Democrats, meanwhile, leveraged their influence to increase spending for domestic priorities such as combating opioid misuse.The result could be the return of trillion-dollar deficits for the first time since Obama’s first term.The stopgap spending bill would keep the government open through March 23 to allow time to write and pass detailed follow-up “omnibus” legislation to fund the government through the Sept. 30 end of the fiscal year.The prospective longer-term budget agreement would give both the Pentagon and domestic agencies relief from a budget freeze that lawmakers say threatens military readiness and training as well as domestic priorities such as combating opioid abuse and repairing the government’s troubled health care system for veterans.The temporary funding measure would also reauthorize funding for community health centres, which enjoy widespread bipartisan support.Aides in both parties said the budget measure may also contain a provision to raise the government’s $20.5 trillion borrowing limit. Legislation to increase the debt ceiling is always a headache, especially for House GOP leaders whose rank and file have in the past used the votes to register objection to deficit spending.Another likely addition is more than $80 billion in long-overdue hurricane relief for Texas, Florida and Puerto Rico, a top priority of lawmakers in both parties.Under Congress’ arcane ways, a broad-brush agreement to increase legally binding spending “caps” — which would otherwise keep the budgets for the military and domestic agencies essentially frozen — would be approved, then followed by a far more detailed catchall spending bill that would take weeks to negotiate.It’s clear that Senate Democrats have no appetite for another government shutdown. Their unity splintered during last month’s three-day closure.House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., had linked progress on the budget with action to address the immigration program, but other Democrats are beginning to agitate for delinking the two, lest the opportunity for a budget pact be lost. And having tried and failed to link progress on the budget to DACA during last month’s government shutdown battle, many Democrats aren’t spoiling for a repeat.“It’s hard. If we can get a good deal that funds disaster relief, funds domestic priorities, funds the opioid crisis it would be a difficult call,” said Rep. Adam Smith, D-Wash. “DACA’s important and it ought to get done. But what’s the path?”Schumer said he and Pelosi are “working from the same page,” appearing to discount speculation that she might oppose the coming pact.___AP Writers Jill Colvin, Ken Thomas and Darlene Superville contributed.last_img read more

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Trudeau and Merkel talk trade climate change ahead of June G7 summit

first_imgOTTAWA – Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has spoken to German Chancellor Angela Merkel about making progress on climate change and combating protectionism when they meet at the G7 next month in Quebec.Both are hot button topics with President Donald Trump, who will be making his Canadian debut at the June 8-9 gathering in Quebec’s Charlevoix region.Merkel is the G7’s longest-serving leader and has clashed with Trump in the past, including at his first summit last year in Italy.Trump’s trip to Canada is generating concerns among diplomats and analysts that Trudeau could wind up hosting a summit that could fracture the G7 into a so-called six-plus-one configuration with the U.S. as an outlier.A top European Union official who will be at the table with Trump and Trudeau next month has blasted the U.S. president over his recent decision to withdraw from the Iran nuclear agreement.“With friends like that, who needs enemies?” EU Council President Donald Tusk said in Bulgaria on Wednesday.The EU is a full member of the G7 which means Tusk and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker will join Trudeau, Trump and the leaders of Britain, France, Germany, Italy and Japan at the leaders’ summit.Trudeau and Merkel also spoke about the need to make “meaningful investments” on educating girls and women in crisis settings, a topic that the prime minister is being pushed to champion by leading aid agencies and anti-poverty groups.The two leaders spoke Tuesday while the prime minister was in Edmonton, but his office released an account of the call on Wednesday.Trudeau has tried to find common ground with Trump on gender equality, which is an overarching theme for the prime minister’s chairmanship of the G7.Also on Wednesday, a Canada-U.S. women-in-business group created by Trudeau and Trump released its fourth set of recommendations.The group is trying to remove barriers to female entrepreneurs, and its latest report makes $1.4 billion in new financing from the Business Development Bank of Canada available to women entrepreneurs.— with files from the Associated Presslast_img read more

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Big Five lenders earn collective 106B Q2 profit up 11 per cent

first_imgTORONTO – Canada’s Big Five banks reported a collective second-quarter profit of $10.6 billion, up nearly 11 per cent from a year ago, beating expectations across the board as they brushed off concern about the impact of a cooling real estate market amid tighter mortgage lending guidelines.“The market is in various stages of worry about the outlook for the mortgage market in particular, but the results themselves seem to indicate that a lot of that worry is misplaced,” said Meny Grauman, an analyst with Cormark Securities in Toronto.BMO was the last of the biggest banks to report its earnings for three-month period ended April 30 on Wednesday.Its fiscal second-quarter net profit of $1.25 billion was relatively flat compared with a year ago, but included a $192-million after-tax restructuring charge primarily related to severance costs. Canada’s fourth-largest lender also raised its quarterly dividend to 96 cents per share, up three cents from 93 cents in its previous quarter.BMO said it earned $2.20 per share on an adjusted basis for the quarter, up from $1.92 per share a year ago. Analysts on average had expected the bank to earned $2.12 per share, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon.Like its rivals, BMO benefited from strong earnings on both sides of the border. Its Canadian banking arm saw net income rise 11 per cent to $590 million. And although home sales activity across the country in April hit a monthly low not seen in years, due to factors including a new stress test for uninsured mortgages as of Jan. 1 and higher interest rates, BMO’s total Canadian residential mortgage portfolio grew by 2.2 per cent to $106.4 billion in the latest quarter.BMO has “momentum” in its U.S. personal and commercial business, which is driving “very strong” results in its Canadian business, said chief executive officer Darryl White.“The bank’s performance this quarter, I believe, is indicative of our potential and I remain confident that our diversified businesses will deliver sustainable earnings growth for the future,” he said.The other Big Five banks generated strong earnings at home as well. TD’s Canadian retail division net income was up 17 per cent compared with last year. RBC’s Canadian personal and small business banking division reported a seven per cent increase in net income, while Scotiabank’s domestic banking division saw a five per cent increase and CIBC’s Canadian personal and small business banking division reported a 16 per cent increase in net income.International growth was a bright spot for the Canadian lenders as well, and a big contributor to the $10.6 billion in net income attributable to shareholders amongst them during the quarter.BMO on Wednesday said its U.S. personal and commercial banking division saw net income increase 46 per cent to $348 million for the quarter.The Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce saw an even bigger increase of 431 per cent, helped by its acquisition of Chicago-based PrivateBancorp in June last year.Profits at TD Bank’s U.S. retail arm’s rose 16 per cent, while Royal Bank’s U.S. Wealth Management unit, which includes Los Angeles-based City National, saw a 25 per cent jump. Scotiabank, which has focused its international expansion in Mexico, Peru, Chile and Colombia, saw net income at its international banking arm increase 14 per cent to $675 million.Canada’s sixth-largest bank, National Bank of Canada, also reported better-than-expected results and raised its dividend Wednesday. It earned $547 million or $1.44 per diluted share for the quarter ended April 30, up from $484 million or $1.28 per diluted share in the same quarter last year.“We’re seeing a lot of good contribution from their U.S. and international businesses,” said Robert Colangelo, senior vice president of Canadian banking and financial institutions at ratings agency DBRS.“Those seem to be the platforms that are taking off.”However, a dark cloud loomed as the banks delivered strong second-quarter earnings. BMO and CIBC’s direct banking brand Simplii warned that up to 90,000 clients’ information may have been compromised. BMO and CIBC on Monday said they were contacted a day earlier by “fraudsters” who claimed to have accessed clients sensitive data.The accelerated pace of technological change brings benefits for banking customers in the digital age, but increases risk as well, said BMO’s chief risk officer Surjit Rajpal. The bank will continue to “enhance our layered defences,” he said.“There will be bad actors that will attack banks or other institutions, be it for disruption or financial gain…. From an operational risk standpoint, I think there is an element that has gone up,” Rajpal told analysts.“There’s no question about it, and we’re going to be better prepared for it.”Companies in this story: (TSX:BMO, TSX:RY, TSX:BNS, TSX:TD, TSX:CM)last_img read more

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Data recorder recovered from Leicester owners helicopter

first_imgLEICESTER, England – The flight data recorder from the helicopter that crashed with the Leicester soccer team’s owner on board is being examined by investigators, authorities said, as his family and players paid tribute Monday at a makeshift shrine.Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha and four others were killed when the aircraft spiraled out of control, crashed and burst in flames outside the King Power Stadium following a Premier League game Saturday.Aiyawatt Srivaddhanaprabha, son of the Thai retail entrepreneur, brought a wreath to add to a collection of flowers, jerseys and club memorabilia that was growing after the disaster. Fans who gathered to pay respects broke into applause when Aiyawatt returned to the memorial with the players.Investigators are expected to remain at the site until the end of the week, when the wreckage is to be taken to special facilities for examination, the Air Accidents Investigation Branch said.“We recovered the digital flight data recorder (voice and data) on Sunday afternoon and one of our inspectors travelled back to Farnborough with the recorder the same evening,” the AAIB said in a statement. “Today, our inspectors in Farnborough will start working on the recorder, which was subject to intense heat as a result of the post-accident fire.”Police have not given an update on the investigation but wrote on Twitter its drone “was not in flight at the time the helicopter left the stadium.”Although only with Leicester for eight years, Vichai had a lasting impact on English soccer as the owner of the team that produced one of the greatest shocks in sports by winning the Premier League title at 5,000-1 odds in 2016.Through horse racing and polo, the owner of Thailand’s King Power duty-free chain became known to members of the British royal family, playing on occasion with Princes Charles and William. He spent millions establishing his polo team, the King Power Foxes, which began in 2014 and has enjoyed success at the top levels of competition in Britain.“I was lucky to have known Vichai for several years,” said Prince William, the second-in-line to the British throne. “He was a businessman of strong values who was dedicated to his family and who supported a number of important charitable causes. He made such a big contribution to football, not least through Leicester City’s magical 2016 season that captured the imagination of the world.”Vichai’s close bond with the community in Leicester was reflected in the tributes to the owner who bankrolled the team’s return to the Premier League in 2014 and the improbable title triumph.“The outpouring of grief is a testament to how many people’s lives were touched by those on board,” Prime Minister Theresa May said.Two members of Vichai’s staff, Nursara Suknamai and Kaveporn Punpare, also died along with pilot Eric Swaffer and co-pilot Izabela Roza Lechowicz. In a regular scene after matches that had become a symbol of Vichai’s ownership, the helicopter took off from the centre circle on the field after Saturday’s game against West Ham. It cleared the stadium roof before it plummeted into an adjacent parking lot in flames.Leicester’s next game, which had been scheduled for Tuesday against Southampton in the League Cup, has been postponed.___More AP soccer: https://apnews.com/tag/apf-Soccer and https://twitter.com/AP_Sportslast_img read more

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Officials meet with GM chief over plant closing

first_imgWASHINGTON — Ohio officials in Congress have met in Washington with General Motors’ chief executive in their bid to keep a northeastern Ohio assembly plant from closing.GM announced last week that it will stop making the Chevy Cruze at its Lordstown plant by March and is considering closing the plant for good. It is part of a massive restructuring for the Detroit-based automaker.Republican Sen. Rob Portman and Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown say they urged GM’s Mary Barra Wednesday to consider bringing other products to Lordstown. Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan, whose district includes the plant, also met with Barra.Portman also contacted President Donald Trump and his labour secretary.GM has about 1,500 people left at its Lordstown operation. Barra says the company is focused on relocation and training opportunities for affected workers.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Fed lifts rates for 4th time this year but sees fewer hikes

first_imgWASHINGTON — The Federal Reserve is raising its key interest rate for the fourth time this year to reflect the U.S. economy’s continued strength but signalling that it expects to slow hikes next year.The quarter-point hike, to a range of 2.25 per cent to 2.5 per cent, lifts the Fed’s benchmark rate to its highest point since 2008. The increase will mean higher borrowing costs for many consumers and businesses.The Fed’s policy statement says “some” further gradual rate increases are likely. But its updated forecast projects just two rate hikes next year, down from three that the Fed had predicted in September. In another sign of fewer rate hikes ahead, the new forecast reduces the long-run level for the Fed’s benchmark rate to 2.8 per cent, down from 3 per cent.The Fed has raised rates with steady regularity as the U.S. economy has strengthened. Wednesday’s was the Fed’s ninth hike since it began gradually tightening credit three years ago. But a mix of factors — a global slowdown, a U.S.-China trade war, still-mild inflation, stomach-churning drops in stock prices — has led the Fed to consider slowing its rate hikes in 2019 to avoid weakening the economy too much. It’s now likely to suit its rate policy to the latest economic data — to become more flexible or, in Fed parlance, “data-dependent.”The Fed has so far managed to telegraph its actions weeks in advance to prepare the financial markets for any shift. But now, the risks of a surprise could rise. Next year, Chairman Jerome Powell will begin holding a news conference after each of the Fed’s eight meetings each year, rather than only quarterly. This will allow him to explain any abrupt policy shifts. But it also raises the risk that the Fed will jolt financial markets by catching them off guard.The reasoning for any shift in the Fed’s communications, some analysts say, is that it may want to pause in its credit-tightening to assess how the economy fares in the coming months in light of the headwinds it faces. Contributing to this view was a speech Powell gave last month in which he suggested that rates appear to be just below the level the Fed calls “neutral,” where they’re thought to neither stimulate growth nor impede it. Powell’s comment suggested that the Fed might be poised to slow or halt its rate hikes to avoid weakening the economy.For now, most U.S. economic barometers are still showing strength. The unemployment rate is 3.7 per cent, a 49-year low. The economy is thought to have grown close to 3 per cent this year, its best performance in more than a decade. Consumers, the main driver of the economy, are spending freely.In such an environment, the Fed would normally keep gradually raising rates to make sure the economy didn’t overheat and ignite inflation. But this time, the risks to the economy seem to be rising. From China to Europe, major economies are weakening. President Donald Trump’s trade conflict with Beijing could, over time, undermine the world’s two largest economies.There are also fears that the brisk pace of U.S. growth this year reflected something of a sugar high, with the economy artificially pumped up by tax cuts and a boost in government spending. The benefit of that stimulus will likely fade in 2019, slowing growth to a more modest pace. And as U.S. interest rates have risen, loan-sensitive sectors of the economy, from housing to autos, have begun to weaken.In addition, the Fed has been gradually shrinking the vast portfolio of Treasury and mortgage bonds it built up after the 2008 financial crisis. This process is thought to have had the effect of putting further upward pressure on borrowing rates for consumers and businesses.Economists appear unified in the view that whatever the Fed does, it won’t be influenced by the attacks Trump has made on the central bank and on Powell personally since the stock market began tumbling this fall. In a highly unusual move for a president, Trump has repeatedly and publicly denounced the Fed’s rate increases. At one point, the president called the Fed and its string of rate hikes this year “my biggest threat.”This week, Trump fired off two tweets objecting to a likely rate hike. In one of them, he called it “incredible” that the Fed would consider raising rates again when “the outside world is blowing up around us.”Powell, who was Trump’s hand-picked choice to be chairman, has stressed that the Fed will pursue its mandate of managing rates to maximize employment and stabilize prices, regardless of any outside criticism.Martin Crutsinger, The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Chinas legislature takes up law to ban forced tech transfer

first_imgBEIJING — China’s legislature is considering a law to ban local governments from forcing foreign companies to hand over technology, an issue that helped to spark Washington’s tariff war with Beijing.Beijing has long denied companies are required to trade technology for market access. But officials including Premier Li Keqiang promised this year to crack down as tensions with Washington heated up.The official Xinhua News Agency said a proposed foreign investment law taken up Sunday by the national legislature would make clear officials cannot “force the transfer of technology” as a condition of business ventures.Washington and Beijing have raised tariffs on billions of dollars of each other’s goods in a dispute over American complaints China’s industry plans are based on theft of technology and violate its market-opening obligations.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Canadas billions in fossil fuel subsidies to go under the microscope

first_imgBy Mia RabsonTHE CANADIAN PRESS Last year, auditor general Michael Ferguson said he tried to test the progress being made on phasing out the subsidies but blasted the government for refusing to provide documents that would allow him to do so.Last month, a dozen of Canada’s most well known and influential environment groups flagged lack of action on fossil fuel subsidies in a report card on the government’s efforts to deliver on its environmental promises.Earlier this month, Canada fared poorly in a report ranking the progress of the G7 nations on phasing out fossil fuels. The report, completed by Oil Change International and the International Institute for Sustainable Development, concluded that the seven biggest developed economies in the world collectively contribute more than $100 billion a year to help the fossil fuel industry.While the U.S. spent the most overall, Canada spent the most per capita of any G7 country on oil and gas production, according to the report.Canada also received a poor grade for transparency of its subsidies.Catherine Abreu, executive director of the Climate Action Network-Canada, said agreeing to work with Argentina to peer review each other’s subsidies is a very good sign the government is finally moving on its commitment to phase them out. OTTAWA, O.N. – The federal government has taken a step towards fulfilling its promise to get rid of fossil fuel subsidies by agreeing to finally explain how much it actually spends on them.Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr was in Argentina on Thursday where he and his Argentinian counterpart announced that each country will conduct a study on how much the other country subsidizes its fossil fuel industries.As part of both the G7 and G20, Canada has committed every year since 2009 that it will work to phase out inefficient fossil fuel subsidies. The Liberals made it a campaign promise in 2015 and the following year said it would be done by 2025.center_img Environment groups have used publicly available documents to try and figure out how much Canada subsidizes oil and gas companies but, without the government producing its own thorough review, Abreu said it’s very hard to know what’s missing.Existing reviews suggest Canada offers about $3 billion to companies to explore and produce oil and gas within Canada. Export Development Canada also finances oil production in other countries, spending almost $12 billion in 2016 and $10 billion in 2017 on foreign oil production.Abreu said the government has never really defined what it means by “inefficient” subsidies so this review may finally shed light on that aspect as well.A spokesman for Carr said the government will make the review report public once it is complete.last_img read more

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