Month: August 2019

Jerry Remy Reveals Hes Being Treated for Lung Cancer Relapse

first_img Sign up for Boston Daily. News. Commentary. Every day.* Print 000 Get a compelling long read and must-have lifestyle tips in your inbox every Sunday morning — great with coffee! Jerry Remy Reveals He’s Being Treated for Lung Cancer Relapse The NESN personality will continue adding color to Red Sox broadcasts. center_img Photo via APNESN color analyst Jerry Remy is being treated for a relapse of his lung cancer, the station announced Monday.The 64-year-old broadcaster and former Red Sox second baseman was first diagnosed with lung cancer in 2008. He underwent surgery that same year, but complications from the surgery, including pneumonia and another infection, sidelined Remy from the beginning of the 2009 Red Sox season. He suffered another relapse during the 2013 offseason.I’ve been diagnosed with cancer again but it’s under control. If you would like to read the interview go to:https://t.co/VWfMlV64UA— Jerry Remy (RemDawg) (@Jerry_Remy) February 13, 2017NESN indicated that despite his treatment, Remy will return to the broadcast booth for his 30th season after the station extended his contract.“I’m very excited and pleased to be able to continue doing the job that I love, now heading into my 30th year and beyond with NESN,” Remy said in a statement. “I want to thank NESN and the Red Sox for all their support in the past and going forward.”Remy will address his diagnosis in an interview with colleague Tom Caron to be aired Monday evening, emphasizing the importance of regular screenings and checkups. By Kyle Scott Clauss· 2/13/2017, 11:46 a.m. last_img read more

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12 Bars and Breweries with Running Clubs

first_img 000 Did we miss any? Let us know in the comments. Print Read all about the latest gym openings, healthy events, and fitness trends in our twice weekly Wellness newsletter. 3/29/2017, 11:20 a.m. Sign up for Health & Wellness newsletters. Everything you need to stay healthy and fit.* 12 Bars and Breweries with Running Clubs Join these fun groups run by local breweries, bars, and restaurants. If running and beer aren’t a match made in heaven, we don’t know what is. But don’t just settle for the free pour at the end of your next 5K—these Massachusetts breweries, bars, and restaurants all field boozy running clubs of their own. Cheers!Photo by Tim Oxton/Night Shift BrewingBreweries with Run ClubsBent Water Brewing: Join the Thunder Squad Running Club for a weekly 3.2-mile run from the Lynn taproom to the beach. The crew meets on Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m, and the taproom also hosts yoga classes on some Saturdays.Bent Water Brewing, 180 Commercial St., Lynn, bentwaterbrewing.com.Night Shift Brewing: Night Shift hosts Wednesday evening 5K fun runs on the Northern Strand Community Trail. The group sets off from the brewery at 7 p.m.Night Shift Brewing, 87 Santilli Highway, Everett, nightshiftbrewing.com.Notch: Meters for Liters comes together for weekly 5K runs on Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m., beginning at Notch’s Salem brewery. Afterward, runners are invited to enjoy beer and free pretzels.Notch Brewing, 283 Derby St., Salem, notchbrewing.com.Slumbrew: Runners (or walkers) of all paces are invited to join Slumbrew’s Happy Soles Run Club for 3.1-mile jaunts starting and ending at the brewery. Its American Fresh Brewhouse at Assembly Row also hosts runs.Slumbrew, 115 Ward St. and American Fresh Brewhouse Beer Garden, 1301 Canal St., Somerville, slumbrew.com.Photo courtesy of Social Boston SportsRun Clubs + PubsThe Brighton Bangers: Survive Hump Day with 7 p.m. runs originating in Oak Square, and ending at neighborhood dive the Last Drop. There are also Saturday morning runs, no booze involved.Oak Square, Brighton, brightonbangers.com.The Burren: This Somerville pub hosts a 5K fun run—otherwise known as the “Bur-Run”—each Monday at 6:45 p.m. Runners are invited to head back to the restaurant afterward for food and brews.The Burren, 247 Elm St., Somerville, burren.com.Runfellow: This group sponsors two different run groups, so pick your poison. On Tuesdays, run around Cambridge and Somerville. On Thursdays, head over to the Back Bay. Both groups meet at 7:30 p.m. and end at a neighborhood bar or restaurant.Various locations, runfellow.com.Social Boston Sports: In addition to its many sports leagues, Social Boston Sports fields a run club that meets at Lir every Tuesday at 6:45 p.m. Finish off your three-, five-, or seven-mile journey with a cold beer.Lir, 903 Boylston St., Boston, socialbostonsports.com.Stephi’s in Southie: Meet at Stephi’s in Southie each Monday at 6:30 p.m., go for a jog, then head back to the restaurant for complimentary appetizers and a cash bar.Stephi’s in Southie, 130 Dorchester Ave., Boston, stephaniesrestaurantgroup.com.True Runner: This Chestnut Hill running shop sponsors a Pub Runs series. At each event, the True Runner crew partners with a running brand and Bill’s Pizzeria in Newton Centre, serving up 3.5-mile runs followed by pizza and brews. The first round is on them.Visit truerunner.com for information about future events.Photo courtesy of Bantam CiderHonorable Mention:Bantam: Though it’s taking a brief hiatus from its weekly run club, this Somerville cidery fields a team at each of the Cambridge 5K Series’ eight local races. If you run with Team Bantam, you get to join its VIP area after each race.Various locations and prices. Register for each race here.Longfellows: Yes, we know this is a coffee shop—but its location within Lamplighter Brewing carves out a place on our list. Check out its run group, a collaboration with running apparel brand Janji, at 7 a.m. on Thursdays, then head back to the shop for a caffeine boost.Longfellows, 284 Broadway, Cambridge, longfellowscambridge.com. By Jamie Ducharme· last_img read more

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On the Market An Antique Abode Facing Harvards Town Common

first_img Sign up for our weekly home and property newsletter, featuring homes for sale, neighborhood happenings, and more. For Sale/Rent On the Market: An Antique Abode Facing Harvard’s Town Common With views of the town center from a cupola. Photo via Harvard Realty14 Fairbank Street, HarvardPrice: $898,500Size: 3,811 square feetBedrooms: 4Baths: 3.5Built in 1806, this white brick home in Harvard is a time-honored gem. The antique abode is situated on just under an acre of land, boasting manicured grounds and a centuries-old carriage house. Though the property faces the town common, it offers plenty of privacy as it’s set back on a wide, grassy front yard.Inside the home, period craftsmanship abounds, from its crown moldings and exposed beams to its six fireplaces and high ceilings. There are three sets of staircases in the house, including one that curves to the upper levels. In addition to four bedrooms, the house has a second-floor laundry room that abuts what listing agent Rhonda Spragu calls a “secret” room. (She suggests it could be converted into a teen’s bedroom.) The building is topped off with a third-story cupola, offering views of Harvard’s charming town center.For information, contact Rhonda Spragu, Harvard Realty, harvardrealty.com.Photo via Harvard RealtyPhoto via Harvard RealtyPhoto via Harvard RealtyPhoto via Harvard RealtyPhoto via Harvard RealtyPhoto via Harvard RealtyPhoto via Harvard RealtyPhoto via Harvard RealtyPhoto via Harvard RealtyPhoto via Harvard RealtyPhoto via Harvard RealtyPhoto via Harvard RealtyPhoto via Harvard RealtyPhoto via Harvard RealtyPhoto via Harvard RealtyPhoto via Harvard RealtyPhoto via Harvard RealtyPhoto via Harvard RealtyPhoto via Harvard RealtyThe Boston Home team has curated a list of the best home design and home remodeling professionals in Boston, including architects, builders, kitchen and bath experts, lighting designers, and more. Get the help you need with FindIt/Boston’s guide to home renovation pros. 4/10/2018, 9:44 a.m. By Madeline Bilis· center_img 46047 Print Sign up for Home & Property newsletters. Design, real estate, and pretty things for living.*last_img read more

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Finding CTE in Living People BU Just Got Closer to Doing It

first_imgResearch Finding CTE in Living People? BU Just Got Closer to Doing It Diagnosing the disease that plagues the NFL while athletes are still alive may be possible, researchers say. Boston University School of Medicine scientist Robert Stern | Photo via AP/Steven SenneA major, promising step forward has just been announced in the study of CTE, the disease that wreaks havoc on the brains of former NFL players.Researchers at Boston University announced this week that a new brain scan may be able to do what until now has been all but impossible: diagnose it before an athlete dies.Using a PET scan, scientists at BU’s Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Center say they were able to analyze living brains and detect the protein tau, a sign of the neurodegenerative disease linked to sometimes severe changes in mood and behavior. Right now the only way to know for sure if someone—say, Aaron Hernandez, who was diagnosed posthumously—has CTE is to cut into their brain after he or she dies.To be clear, it’s still too soon to declare it possible to diagnose CTE in individual living patients. The study was only able to identify a difference between a control group and a group of 26 retired NFL players with CTE-like symptoms. The results were published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine.“We need to study larger numbers of people with greater variability in their history of being hit [in the head] repeatedly and in their history of CTE-related symptoms,” Robert Stern, the CTE center’s clinical research director, tells BU Today. He predicts diagnosis for individuals will be possible “in the next five years or so.”A BU #CTE researcher has reached a milestone towards diagnosing the disease in the living. An experimental PET (positron emission tomography) scan was able to detect abnormal brain tissue in a group of former NFL players. https://t.co/ErULKawgbD— Boston University (@BU_Tweets) April 11, 2019That’s a big deal. If researchers could diagnose CTE without having to do an autopsy, it could help them better understand how it progresses, or develop treatments. It may also contribute to the ongoing conversation CTE research has sparked about brain injury both inside and outside professional football. In just the past few years, we’ve learned CTE can develop from repetitive minor head injuries, not necessarily concussions, and that youth sports can have a lifelong impact on brain health, as playing football at a younger age can increase the likelihood of contracting the disease earlier in life. 39244 Sign up for Boston Daily. News. Commentary. Every day.* 4/11/2019, 10:58 a.m. center_img Get a compelling long read and must-have lifestyle tips in your inbox every Sunday morning — great with coffee! Print By Spencer Buell· last_img read more

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