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Today FM team given stern talking to about weak ck comment

first_img Saturday 3 Dec 2016, 11:00 AM Today FM team given stern talking to about ‘weak c**k’ comment The presenter was talking about the literal translation of a German word. 50,554 Views http://jrnl.ie/3115384 Share4 Tweet Email1 37 Comments By Michelle Hennessy Dec 3rd 2016, 11:00 AM Image: microphone image via Shutterstock Image: microphone image via Shutterstock TODAY FM HAD a “stern” talk with the Fergal D’Arcy show team after a discussion that led to the use of the term ‘weak cock’.A complaint was made to the Broadcasting Authority of Ireland, which stated that two DJs were discussing the German term ‘Schlappschwanz’, which is used to describe a person as a ‘wimp’ During this conversation, presenter Fergal D’Arcy mentioned that it can literally be translated as ‘weak cock’.The complainant felt this type of language was “not acceptable” on live radio. The BAI rejected the complaint, noting the remark was made in passing and was in line with the general approach of the programme. The authority also said that while some people listening may have found the humour offensive, the content was not likely to have caused widespread offence.In its response to the BAI complaint, Today FM said it was “confident no innuendo was used” and that the mistranslation was delivered in “a mostly factual tone”.Though the radio station said it was satisfied that it had not breached regulations, it had “spoken with the team very sternly about having a better content filter and to avoid such a juvenile approach in the future”.Read: Radio show allowed special needs children to be called ‘mongos’>Read: ‘That f**king thing’: Tommy Tiernan receives complaint over ‘blasphemous’ comment> Short URL Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

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Millions cast their ballot early

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram A record number of over 2.5 million Australians have already cast their vote in the 2013 Australian Federal Election. There are a number of reasons why Australians choose to vote early from having to work today, travel, family events such as weddings, or just, a simple wanting to avoid the polling booths on such a busy election day Tomorrow, there will be over 8,000 polling places open around the country from 8:00 am to 6:00 pm local time. Over 43 million ballot papers have been printed with 50,000 ballot boxes producsed and distributed. The counting of votes will begin in every polling place after doors close at 6:00 pm on election day. Polling officials will count all first preferences on the House of Representatives ballot papers. Next they will conduct a two-candidate-preferred count of all House of Representatives ballot papers.Once this task is complete, all polling places will commence counting the Senate first preferences. In some of the largest counting (scrutiny) centres, completion of the Senate first preference count may be finalised on Sunday.All results are updated constantly on the AEC Virtual Tally Room, accessed via the AEC website./Provision of results through the VTR continues in the following days and weeks until the election is concluded.last_img read more

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Labor amends no contact adoption policy

first_imgThe Victorian government has amended the state’s 1984 Adoption Act to repeal laws that prevented natural parents from attempting to contact their adult children who were adopted during childhood. Under practices introduced by the previous Liberal government, adopted children could lodge a ‘no contact’ statement that restricted contact initiated by their natural parents. Breach of such a statement is treated as a criminal offence. Minister for Families and Children Jenny Mikakos spoke of the one-sided and discriminatory nature of the ‘no contact’ statements, particularly for parents whose children were forcibly removed.“Natural parents, mothers in particular, have told me how hurt they have been by contact vetoes and I am proud to deliver on Labor’s commitment to amend the Adoption Act to get rid of the vetoes and criminal penalties,” said Ms Mikakos.“It was cruel of the previous government to make it an offence for mothers to contact their adult adopted children.”Under the changes, both parents and children, and related parties, are still able to record their wishes regarding their desire to establish contact and other personal information through the Adoption Information Registrar.Individuals seeking personal and family information, or support regarding past experiences with adoption can contact Family Information Networks and Discovery (FIND) on 1300 769 926. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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Tougher measures ahead to deal with squatters

first_img Related Items:#magneticmedianews, #Squatters Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppTurks and Caicos, July 3rd 2017 – Providenciales – Tougher measures are on the horizon as the Turks and Caicos Government takes aim at squatting.Squatting or illegal construction is a long standing problem and the new PDM Administration through Minister Goldray Ewing said the Planning Department is already empowered to deal with squatters or anyone building illegally in the Turks and Caicos, but amendments in Parliament will give planning officers more immediate power to deal with unlicensed building.It is a problem rampant throughout the islands and often, work permit holders are doing it but now, employers are put on notice by the Minister who reminded that housing for expatriate staff is a legal requirement; no foreign worker should be forced to have to build their own dwelling.  Low cost housing is also planned as an option by Government for those constructing illegally, as Minister Ewing said that the crackdown is less about making people homeless and more about regulating for quality constructions.center_img #MagneticMediaNewslast_img read more

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Four teens involved in Salmon Creek rollover wreck

first_imgFour teenagers on their way to Skyview High School were involved in a single-car rollover wreck Wednesday morning near the intersection of Northwest 36th Avenue and Creekside Drive.Clark County Fire District 6 was dispatched to the wreck at about 7:40 a.m., said Dawn Johnson, a spokeswoman.All four teens, three girls and a boy, were out of the car when firefighters arrived.The driver, Alyssa Dawkins, 17, told firefighters she was coming down the hill when a car veered into her lane and she had to swerve to avoid it. Dawkins said she struck a pothole and lost control. The car rolled several times down an embankment near the Salmon Creek Greenway, coming to a rest on its wheels.The driver of the other vehicle continued on without stopping, Dawkins told authorities.All four teens were wearing seat belts, Johnson said. Two girls were transported to Southwest Washington Medical Center to be treated for what were believed to be minor injuries. The three teens’ identities were not released by authorities.Dawkins and the boy were picked up at the scene by their parents. The Clark County Sheriff’s Office is investigating.last_img read more

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ARREST LOG Wilmington Police Make 2 Arrests Issue 1 Summons

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — According to Wilmington Police Logs, Wilmington Police issued the following arrests and summonses between June 21, 2019 and June 27, 2019.Friday, June 21, 2019Thais Dias (29, Malden) was arrested on a warrant for unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle and speeding. (5:16pm)Saturday, June 22, 2019Matthew Figucia (22, Wilmington) was arrested for OUI Liquor. (12:58am)Patrick C. Taylor (26, Wilmington) was issued a summons for Operating A Motor Vehicle with a Suspended License. (8:29am)Sunday, June 23, 2019NoneMonday, June 24, 2019NoneTuesday, June 25, 2019NoneWednesday, June 26, 2019NoneThursday, June 27, 2019None(DISCLAIMER: This information is public information.  An arrest does not constitute a conviction.  Any arrested person is innocent until proven guilty.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedARREST LOG: Wilmington Police Make 2 Arrests & Issue 2 SummonsesIn “Police Log”ARREST LOG: Wilmington Police Make 1 Arrest & Issue 2 SummonsesIn “Police Log”ARREST LOG: Wilmington Police Make 5 Arrests & Issue 4 SummonsesIn “Police Log”last_img read more

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Necropsy planned for humpback hit by cruise ship

first_imgA humpback whale is seen lodged on the front of the Grand Princess Wednesday in Ketchikan. (KRBD photo by Leila Kheiry)A Princess Cruise Lines ship traveling through Southeast Alaska’s Inside Passage hit a humpback whale that became lodged on the front bulbous bow.Listen nowThe whale was removed after the Grand Princess docked in downtown Ketchikan Wednesday morning, and the dead animal was towed to a nearby beach.In a statement released Wednesday, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Office of Law Enforcement said its officers are investigating the cause of the whale’s death.Gary Freitag of the Alaska Sea Grant Marine Advisory Program said he will be involved in the necropsy, to determine how it died. He said it’s possible that the whale already was dead before it was struck by the ship.“So, you really don’t know whether the ship had anything to with it or not,” Freitag said. “The necropsy will have a tendency to determine, the best we can, whether it was hit while it was still alive or whether it was dead, floating. You can also look at the decomposition and see how long it was before the animal was hit. Whether it was right away or whether it was floating around for a week.”Freitag said he hadn’t yet seen the dead whale himself, but he was told it was about 30-feet-long, which means it was a calf.“Humpbacks are usually 40- to 50-foot when they’re adults,” Freitag said. “So, it’s a young humpback, from what I understand.”Freitag said he’s working with NOAA officials to schedule the necropsy, which likely will take place Thursday. He said there are a lot of logistics to work out first, including rounding up volunteers to help.last_img read more

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Caught in immigration mess USborn Tsimshian teacher fights to stay in ancestral

first_imgMique’l Dangeli teaches students how to bake salmon fins. Dangeli moved to British Columbia to teach Tsimshian culture in her ancestors’ traditional territory, but faces an immigration fight to live and work in Canada. (Photo courtesy Mique’l Dangeli)When the homelands of indigenous groups straddle the border between U.S. and Canada, traveling back and forth becomes an immigration issue. You might think the countries would have similar policies, but it isn’t that easy.One U.S.-born Tsimshian teacher is caught in the mess, fighting to legally stay and work in her ancestral homeland in British Columbia.Listen nowMique’l Dangeli teaches the Tsimshian language — Sm’algya̱x — to children and adults, including at a school in Kitsumkalumm, British Columbia.Now, she’s fighting to stay. Her post-graduate work visa expired July 1 – along with her ability to legally work in Canada.She applied for Canadian citizenship – but was denied – twice. The first time, she hadn’t taken a required English exam. Her frustration boiled over while talking to an immigration representative:“The Canadian government as well as the American government have forced, over a 200-year timespan, our people to speak English through physical, emotional, spiritual and sexual abuse,’” she said. “‘I have to take an English exam to continue to teach Sm’algyax here?’”“And she said, ‘I’m sorry. … I don’t make the rules, I’m sorry. This is what you have to do.’”Still, Dangeli took the $500 exam. Then she says Canadian immigration denied her the second time. It’s complicated, but she says it has to do with her husband’s immigration status.Canada views her husband as a landed immigrant. His nation, the Nisga’a, gave up their First Nations status cards in favor of Nisga’a status cards, which were to offer the same rights as First Nations members. But they don’t. And because of his status, he can’t sponsor Mique’l into the country.“Now we’re both, both our rights, to be here be in B.C. and our peoples’ traditional territory is being called into question,” Dangeli said.Canadian immigration officials did not return a request for comment by this story’s deadline.Her situation isn’t unique. She says indigenous people such as Gwich’in, Haida, Tlingit and Coast Salish also face issues crossing the border.“It’s just that it doesn’t get all the media attention that all the other border issues do. I’ve always felt that the northern border between U.S. and B.C. in particular, the U.S. and also the Yukon are completely ignored because of all the focus on Mexico-U.S. border.”Mique’l Dangeli teaches seventh- through ninth-grade students at the Northwest Community College longhouse in Terrace, British Columbia.(Photo courtesy Mique’l Dangeli)Dangeli grew up on the Annette Island Indian Reserve in Metlakatla, Alaska. The Ph.D. in Northwest Coast Native art history moved to British Columbia to focus on teaching Sm’algya̱x in the traditional Tsimshian territory.“With my education and my work history regardless of who I am in terms of being a Tsimshian woman, it’s not good enough within the Canadian system,” she said.She even gave up a tenure track position at the University of Alaska Southeast to do so.“We should be afforded the same rights as our relatives on the Canadian side to come to the U.S. to live and work as we please,” she said.She’s talking about the Jay Treaty, which was signed in 1795 and allowed Natives to trade and travel across the border of U.S. and Canada, then a British territory. But Canada does not recognize the treaty.Dangeli says First Nations status holders from Canada can live and work in the U.S., but Canada doesn’t reciprocate with U.S.-born Natives.“Canada is exporting indigenous people to the U.S., not importing us.”Mique’l Dangeli teaches primary students to read “Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What do You See” in Sm’algyax. (Photo courtesy Mique’l Dangeli)In the meantime, Dangeli’s school in British Columbia is on summer break. She’ll travel back to Metlakatla to visit friends and family. And Canada issued her a visitor’s extension through part of July.Canada’s asymmetrical polices don’t surprise Damien Lee. He’s an associate fellow at Yellowhead Institute, a First Nations public policy center in Toronto.“The irony is that if Canada exists because of First Nations permission, yet First Nations are being denied permission by Canada to exercise their current political jurisdiction. To me that’s mind blowing.”Dangeli is circulating a petition urging Canada to change its policies and allow U.S.-born indigenous people to live and work in the Great White North.Until then, things are in the hands of Dangeli’s lawyers and Canadian immigration.last_img read more

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Candidates for governor differ on how to pay for government PFDs

first_imgJuneau Chamber of Commerce Gubernatorial ForumVolume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Live00:0000:0000:00 Gavel Alaska coverage of forum (also available as a Facebook video)The three major candidates vying to become Alaska’s next governor debated permanent fund dividends and other issues in Juneau Thursday.Listen nowHow to pay for state government – as well as for permanent fund dividends – was a point of big division for the candidates at the Juneau Chamber of Commerce forum. Gov. Bill Walker, an independent, asked Republican former state Sen. Mike Dunleavy about $1.1 billion in budget cuts he said he would make in January 2017.Walker noted that Dunleavy declined to say he would cut specific departments during a recent KTVA-hosted debate.“Nearly every department, you said no,” Walker said. “So, could you tell us today where’s that $1.1 billion cut you’ve been talking about so much? It fits on a bumper sticker, but I’m not sure where it comes from.”Dunleavy isn’t proposing the same cut this year. He said the state must develop its natural resources more to generate revenue.Dunleavy asked Walker if he would handle his veto of dividends two years ago differently today.“Cutting that PFD in half, causing a number of small businesses to fail, as well as individuals having to really take a look at their finances and reconfigure how they were going to manage through that process — knowing this, would you do anything different?” Dunleavy asked.Walker said he doesn’t look back, but that the veto allowed the permanent fund to grow and keep dividends secure in the future.Democratic former U.S. Sen. Mark Begich questioned Dunleavy’s plan for paying out PFDs. Dunleavy supports the traditional formula for dividends, which would raise their cost by $840 million this year. Begich said this will lead to unsustainable draws on permanent fund earnings.“When you lay out your numbers, at some point something’s gonna give,” Begich said. “And what will give is the earnings reserve, and at some point, it will be to zero.  Which means, your plan does not have a long term. It’s a short term. I get it, I see what you’re saying, but the long-term plan, for the next generation is: There will be no money to help service not only the government, but also, there will be no dividend.”Begich’s dividend plan would cost roughly $300 million more than the state will spend on PFDs this year.Begich said he has a track record at the federal and local level of working with politicians who disagree.“You know, if you have to work with (U.S. Senators) Bernie Sanders and Ted Cruz and everyone in between, working here in Juneau is not that hard, I’m going to tell you that,” Begich said. “And if you’ve been an assembly member, and you’ve survived that, everything is a piece of cake.”Walker defended his record, noting that the projected gap between what the state spends and what it raises has fallen from $3.7 billion dollars to $700 million.“I refer to it as, the fiscal house was on fire. And it was on fire. And Lt. Gov. Mallott and I ran to it,” said Walker, who later added: “Lt. Gov. Mallott and I know that the fire’s put out, because these two folks want to move into the house that now we put the fire out of.”Dunleavy said he would look to lower the limit on how much the state government can spend.“We have to revisit that appropriation limit,” Dunleavy said. “We have to look at a way to cap the size and growth of this operating budget. If we don’t do that, there is no fiscal plan, there is no amount of PFD that can keep up with it.”The candidates addressed some issues of particular interest to Southeast Alaska. They all said the capital will remain in Juneau.Dunleavy said he supports extending the road north from Juneau. Walker said the proposal is flawed because it wouldn’t connect with other roads, and that addressing the remaining budget shortfall is a bigger priority. Begich said he wouldn’t restart the road project, adding that there should be a statewide approach to building roads and other projects.The candidates varied widely in their assessments of President Donald Trump. On a scale of 0 to 10, Begich graded him as a “4 minus,” which he revised to a “2” after the debate. Dunleavy gave Trump an “8.” And Walker gave him a “5.”Gubernatorial candidates Mike Dunleavy, Bill Walker and Mark Begich introduce themselves at a Juneau Chamber of Commerce forum on Thursday in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/Alaska’s Energy Desk)last_img read more

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RMG workers death sparks protest in Gazipur

first_imgMap of GazipurWorkers of a local RMG factory blocked Dhaka-Myemnsingh highway for nearly 90 minutes following the death of a fellow worker in a road accident at Nagpara of Gazipur on Friday.Abdul Hye, in-charge of Naojor police camp, said Tuli Akhter, a worker of Ridisha Garment Factory was killed when a covered van knocked her down at Nagpara while going to his workplace around 8:00am.As the death news spread around, the factory workers put up barricade on the highway protesting the incident, halting vehicular movement for about one and a half hours.On information, police went to the spot and brought the situation under control.Traffic movement on the highway returned to normalcy around 10:00am, police said.last_img read more

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Scientists Learning More About How Harveys Floodwaters Behaved

first_img Share Listen 00:00 /00:44 NASARunoff from Hurricane Harvey as seen by satellite imaging.After studying how Harvey’s floodwaters moved through Houston toward the Gulf of Mexico, scientists are learning more about how the flooding behaved.The findings were discussed an annual meeting of ocean scientists in Portland, Oregon on Tuesday. A study from the University of Florida found that Houston’s bayous and rivers were so overwhelmed by rain that key draining points became clogged. The study’s author, Arnoldo Valle-Levinson, explained that as Buffalo Bayou was trying to empty floodwaters into Galveston Bay, flows from the San Jacinto River at times caused the flooding to push back up into the Houston area, which helped keep water levels high for days.Valle-Levinson said sea level rise made the bottleneck worse.“The ocean was preconditioning the flooding in Houston and in Galveston Bay,” he said.Another study from Texas A&M did find some good news: the storm’s contaminated floodwaters didn’t flow far enough into the Gulf of Mexico to reach the protected Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Xlast_img read more

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Tonight AFROs First Edition with Sean Yoes Wednesday April 1

first_imgListen at WEAA Live Stream: http://amber.streamguys.com.4020/live.m3uIndiana’s so-called, “Religious Freedom Law,” has been characterized by a growing number of individuals and companies as a mandate for intolerance. We’ll examine the controversial issue with our panel of experts. Plus,  AFRO reporter Roberto Alejandro, investigative journalist Stephen Janis and Taya Graham, co-editor of, “You Can’t Stop Murder: Truths About Policing in Baltimore and Beyond,” talk local politics and news. This and more coming up this evening on AFRO’s First Edition with Sean Yoes.last_img read more

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Kozy Kerchief Kozy Kaps for Cancer Patients

first_imgThe Lambda Kappa Omega chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha will hold their annual Kozy Kerchief & Kozy Kaps program at the Vienna Presbyterian Church, 124 Park St. NE, on Oct. 24 from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. The event will take place on National Make A Difference Day and consist of AKA  members and volunteers creating, sewing and hand delivering head wraps for women and children undergoing cancer treatments at local hospitals.For more information, visit aka-lko.org/programs/kozy-kerchief-kozy-kapslast_img read more

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Passing kidney stones can be as simple as riding a roller coaster

first_imgKidney stones are just no fun — each year more than 300,000 people end up in the emergency room with painful kidney stones. Treatment for this condition can cost thousands of dollars, but doctors from Michigan State University are looking into a much cheaper (and more enjoyable) alternative. It turns out that riding certain roller coasters could knock those suckers loose for the cost of an amusement park ticket.Professor and urologist David Wartinger started to wonder if roller coasters could be an effective treatment for kidney stones after he had several patients report they passed stubborn kidney stones (which are an accumulation of calcium oxalate and similar materials) after riding Big Thunder Mountain at Walt Disney World. So, Wartinger did what any dedicated scientist would do — he went to Disney World with a synthetic 3D model of a human kidney.Wartinger took the model, which was loaded with several kidney stone analogs, on Big Thunder Mountain a whopping 20 times. So, I assume he spent about a week waiting in line. The data showed that sitting in the last few cars resulted in a 64% chance of the kidney stones being dislodged, but sitting in the front cars had only a 16% success rate. In a patient, this allows them to pass the stone with limited discomfort.So what’s going on here? Wartinger figured out from testing other roller coasters that Big Thunder Mountain is perfect for helping to pass kidney stones. It doesn’t go too fast, but there’s a lot of rough, quick turns. It also doesn’t go upside down. The rear cars tend to shake more on the track, so they were more effective at passing stones.The high g-forces and speed of rides like Space Mountain were not effective at passing stones. Wartinger suggests that patients with kidney stones might want to give roller coasters like Big Thunder Mountain a shot. It might even be useful to ride one ever year or so for kidney maintenance. Plus, it’s way more fun than going to the emergency room.last_img read more

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Ancient crystals offer evidence of the start of Earths core solidifying

first_imgCredit: CC0 Public Domain Study of zircon crystals casts doubt on evidence for early development of magnetic field © 2019 Science X Network Planetary scientists have found strong evidence that suggests the Earth has an inner and an outer core. The inner core is believed to be solid, while the outer core is made up of molten material. Prior evidence has also indicated that the entire core was once liquid, but as the interior cooled, the innermost part began to crystallize. It is at this point that scientists disagree—some suggest the start of solidification began as far back as 2.5 billion years ago. Others believe it was much more recent—perhaps as recent as just 500 million years ago. In this new effort, the researchers have found evidence that supports the latter theory.The work by the researchers involved carefully analyzing plagioclase and clinopyroxene crystals, which have been dated to approximately 565 million years ago. The crystals are important because they contain bits of metal called inclusions. The inclusions are very small and needle-shaped and aligned themselves with the Earth’s magnetic field as they became embedded in the crystal. Since the Earth’s magnetic field is generated by activity in the inner core, the inclusions are a means of determining the state of the core during the time when the crystals formed. The researchers report that their analysis showed that the magnetic field was significantly weaker than it is today, suggesting that solidification of the core must have occurred soon thereafter or the magnetic field would have collapsed altogether. The reason it did not, theory suggests, is because as the inner core solidified, he magnetic field became stronger. Explore further More information: Richard K. Bono et al. Young inner core inferred from Ediacaran ultra-low geomagnetic field intensity, Nature Geoscience (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41561-018-0288-0center_img A quartet of researchers from the University of Rochester and the University of California has found evidence of the starting period for the solidification of Earth’s core. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, Richard Bono, John Tarduno, Francis Nimmo and Rory Cottrell describe their analysis of ancient crystals found in eastern Canada, what they found, and why they believe their results offer clues about the formation of Earth’s inner core. Peter Driscoll, with the Carnegie Institution for Science, has written a News and Views piece on the study in the same journal issue. Citation: Ancient crystals offer evidence of the start of Earth’s core solidifying (2019, January 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-ancient-crystals-evidence-earth-core.html Journal information: Nature Geoscience This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Clean Dwarka HC summons senior civic Metro officials

first_imgThe Delhi High Court on Wednesday asked top officials of the Delhi Development Authority (DDA), the South Delhi Municipal Corporation (SDMC) and the Delhi Metro to be personally present in court to explain the work done by them to clean up Dwarka sub-city.A division bench of Justice B.D Ahmed and Justice Sanjeev Sachdeva summoned DDA’s chief engineer, Dwarka, SDMC’s chief engineer, DEMS, and Delhi Metro’s deputy general manager, civil, on February 25. Also Read – Company director arrested for swindling Rs 345 croreThe court’s direction came after noting that the agencies are not doing anything to make the area clear despite its directions.“We thought in this small area, you (various agencies) will so some work. But nothing is happening,” the bench observed. Ebbani Aggarwal, a law student and resident of Dwarka, who had filed a public interest litigation (PIL) told the court that the markets, roads, footpaths and open vacant land and other places in Dwarka sub-city were full of litter, filth, rubbish, solid waste and remains of construction material.last_img read more

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Two killed after portion of coal mine in Pandaveswar caves in

first_imgKolkata: Two workers were killed in a coal mine at Pandaveswar in West Burdwan when a portion of it caved in on Sunday early morning.Police said the victims — Chandrasekhar Giri (42) and Kaleswar Mahato (40) — were working night shift and they got trapped when a portion of mine caved in at around 4.15 am on Sunday. The incident took place at Pandaveswar Khottadihi Coalmine.Chandrasekhar used to work as an overman while Kaleswar was a dresser.They were working at the coal mine since last night. All of a sudden, a rock slab around seven feet in length fell on them. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeOther workers gathered in the area and took the initiative to rescue them. Disaster Management Group of the Eastern Coalfields Limited (ECL) also went to the spot and continued the rescue work. They found the workers trapped inside the coal mine. Both of them were rescued and taken to a hospital where they were declared brought dead.The incident led to panic among other workers and immediately demanded necessary steps to check recurrence of such incidents. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedThey also demanded a probe by the ECL authorities in this connection. The victim’s co-workers demanded a compensation amount and a job for one of their family members.Other workers, who witnessed the incident, told police they heard a loud sound all of a sudden.Initially, they couldn’t understand what had happened. Later, they realised that a portion of the coalmine had caved in. Initially, they couldn’t understand whether anyone was trapped under it. But within a few minutes, it became clear to them that Chandrasekhar and Kaleswar were trapped. They cried for help and the authorities took necessary step to carry out the rescue work.”Both Chandrasekhar and Kaleswar were busy in their work when the incident took place. They did not get time to move out of the place before the rock slab fell on them,” said a worker adding that they expect that the authorities will take necessary steps so that such an incident doesn’t take place again.last_img read more

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TMC office ransacked Suvendu says BJP is very nervous

first_imgKolkata: The Trinamool Congress party office in Contai was ransacked and some vehicles parked outside set ablaze by alleged BJP supporters on Tuesday evening.Suvendu Adhikari, the state Transport minister, stated that BJP supporters, after attending Amit Shah’s rally, ransacked the party office along with several nearby shops. Some bikes were also set on fire. There were long queues of cars on Contai bypass and the miscreants broke the windscreens of many of them that were caught up in the traffic jam. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killed”We do not believe in violence. Or else, we could have taught them a lesson. Such incidents are uncalled for and unfortunate. BJP is losing ground everywhere and such incidents reflect the nervousness of the party,” said Suvendu. He further added: “The BJP should first concentrate on defending its government at the Centre. The people of this country have already made up their mind to vote them out.” “They (BJP) should stop lecturing others on democratic values and people’s rights. Had they provided good governance, they would not have been voted out in three Hindi heartland states (Rajasthan, Chhattisgarh and Madhya Pradesh in the December Assembly polls)”, he said. Meanwhile, Trinamool MP Sisir Adhikari alleged that the CPI(M) supporters who have recently joined the saffron party were behind the Contai ransack. The TMC will take out a rally condemning the incident on Wednesday.last_img read more

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VIDEO Cute toddler extinguishes birthday candle with ridiculous trick shot

first_imgFor most parents, getting a toddler to blow out birthday candles is a monumentally frustrating task. For those folks, this video may be discouraging.A dad posted s video on Injstagram of his soccer savant toddler kicking out a birthday cake candle with a pinpoint strike with a tiny soccer ball.The delicious chocolate cake is set on the ground with a lone candle when the little Messi steps up and smokes a strike that blows it out. He does a cute toddler dance to celebrate and probably dropped a huge deuce in his diaper shortly after nailing the shot. Advertisementlast_img read more

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VIDEO Identifying and Eliminating MRI Safety Hazards

first_img AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Recent Videos View all 606 items Find more SCCT news and videos Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Videos | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 01, 2018 VIDEO: Identifying and Eliminating MRI Safety Hazards Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Find more SCCT news and videos Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Find more SCCT news and videos Women’s Health View all 62 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Robert Junk and Tobias Gilk, MRSO, MRSE, of architectural firm RAD-Planning, discuss the different types of safety hazards associated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and how to assess your own protocols to find and eliminate inefficiencies that could lead to safety hazards. Watch the related VIDEO New App Improves MRI Safety For Implantable DevicesRead the related article “Closing the Loopholes in MRI Safety” FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. MRI Safety Update AHRA 2018Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 12:50Loaded: 1.30%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -12:50 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Technology Reports View all 9 items AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting.center_img Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Information Technology View all 220 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Find more SCCT news and videos Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions.last_img read more

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